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I'm trying to form a circle shape from the outline of several rectangles in P5.js

This is what I have so far but as you can see it's not quite a circle.
https://codepen.io/anon/pen/KZaOKB

const width = 400;
function setup() { 
  createCanvas(width, width);
} 
function draw() { 
  background(220);
  noStroke();
  fill(color(175,100,220));

  for (var i = 0; i <= 36; i++) {
    var e = radians(i * 10);
    var height = 150 * sin(e/2) * 2;

    rect(i*11 ,(width/2)-10-(height/2), 10, height);
  }
}

This is the formulas I'm using to find a circles chord.
enter image description here

I'm not sure if there is something wrong with my maths or I'm using the completely wrong formula. Thanks

  • Please don't link us to external websites (CodePen is fine). Please include the exact formulas you're using directly in your post. What exactly are you asking? Have you tried drawing out a few example circles and figuring out the heights of the rectangles that would create that circle? – Kevin Workman Dec 27 '17 at 17:08
  • Removed link and added formula used. I've tried several different formulas and this was the best result I got. – Owen Dec 27 '17 at 17:17
  • And in this your code, what is the radius of the circle? What is the angle? You seem to have a bunch of magic numbers in your code. Where are they coming from? And again, the best advice I can give you is to draw out a bunch of example circles and figure out the heights of the rectangles, and then try to find the pattern. – Kevin Workman Dec 27 '17 at 17:24
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This is called an arcs Sagitta (The height of an arc or segment)

I had the Radius and Sagitta and needed to calculate the arcs Width (aka. the length of the chord) using the following formula:

l = √2sr−s2

s: is the length of the sagitta
r: is the radius of the arc
l: is one half of distance across the base of the arc (half the chord length)
Note In all the above formulae, the length l is half the width of the arc. The full width will be double this. Simply multiply l by 2

circle arc

JavaScript code using P5.js

const r = 200;
const lineWidth = 10;
const lines = (r * 2) / lineWidth;
  
function setup() { 
  createCanvas(400, 400);
} 

function draw() { 
  background(220);
  noStroke();
  fill(color(175,100,220));
  
  for (var i = 0; i <= lines; i++) {
    const s = (i * lineWidth) + lineWidth;
    const chordLength = (Math.sqrt((2 * s * r) - (s*s)) * 2);
    rect(i * lineWidth, r - (chordLength / 2), lineWidth-1, chordLength);
    // rect(x, y, width, height)
  }
  
}
<script src="https://cdnjs.cloudflare.com/ajax/libs/p5.js/0.5.11/p5.min.js"></script>

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I wrote you a function for doing this:

This is p5.js:

function drawCircle(x, y, radius) {
  for (var i = 0; i <= 360; i++) {
    rect(x, y, cos(i) * radius, sin(i) * radius);
  }
}

This is Processing:

void drawCircle(float x, float y, float radius) {
  for (int i = 0; i <= 360; i++) {
    rect(x, y, cos(i) * radius, sin(i) * radius);
  }
}

'i' is the angle (were doing this 360 times. if you want finer detail or you are drawing really big corcles you may want to go smaller steps. e.g.: i += 0.1 this will however increase the time needed to caluclate this) 'x' and 'y' is the position and radius is the circle radius.

You call the function like this:

P5.js:

function setup() {
   createCanvas(100, 100);
   background(0);
   drawCircle(width / 2, height / 2, 50);
}

Processing:

void setup () {
  size(100, 100);
  background(0);
  drawCircle(width / 2, height / 2, 60);
}

This is what the circle looks like (who guessed - i looks like a circle):

The Circle

If we visualize the rectangles:

Circle visualized

My totally professional formulas:

Formulas

I hope this could help. Have a nice day! :D

  • Thanks a lot, it is not exactly what I'm looking for but got me in the right direction. The solution was to find the arcs "chord length" using the known "sagitta" using the formula: l = √ 2sr - s2 – Owen Jan 8 '18 at 9:53

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