0
WITH generated_id AS (
  INSERT INTO ... RETURNING id
)
SELECT id FROM generated_id;

returns 42, whereas

BEGIN;
WITH generated_id AS (
  INSERT INTO ... RETURNING id
)
SELECT id FROM generated_id;
COMMIT;

returns nothing. Why?


Update:

I just found that WITH is irrelevant, because even a single select doesn't work:

SELECT something FROM some_table;

returns rows.

BEGIN;
SELECT something FROM some_table;
COMMIT;

returns no rows.


Update 2:

I thought BEGIN and START TRANSACTION are the exact same things. Anyways, I tried all possible combinations but none of them works for me.

I'm using this free postgres service but now I tested it with SQL Fiddle and it is not complaining.

It is strange however that if I don't put a ; at the end of the SELECT line, my DB engine gives me a syntax error and if I put it there using SQL Fiddle, it tells me that Explicit commits are not allowed.

So it's still very unclear for me what is exactly happening. Whether it only works in SQL Fiddle because it really isn't running my query in an explicit transaction and if it would then the results would be the same: no rows, just as how my DB engine behaves.

I'm unfortunately not able to test it on other servers, but if someone has a reliable postgres config, maybe they could try it for me whether it runs and tell me.

  • 1
    This turned out to be a misunderstanding. For future reference, please remember to declare your version of Postgres (and your client and version) with similar questions. – Erwin Brandstetter Dec 27 '17 at 19:55
1

This will return nothing in most clients because you only see what the last command returned:

BEGIN;
SELECT something FROM some_table;
COMMIT;

Try instead:

BEGIN;
SELECT something FROM some_table;

But don't forget to COMMIT or ROLLBACK later to terminate the open transaction.

SQL Fiddle does not allow explicit transaction wrappers. I quote:

All SQL queries are run within a transaction that gets immediately rolled-back after the SQL executes.

BEGIN; issued inside an open transaction only issues a WARNING - which is not displayed in SQL Fiddle (you see a result with 0 rows).

COMMIT; raises the error you saw.

And in your attempt with omitting the semicolon after the SELECT, COMMIT is interpreted as table alias:

BEGIN;
SELECT something FROM some_table
COMMIT;

... is equivalent to:

BEGIN;
SELECT something FROM some_table AS commit;

So that's another misunderstanding.

0

Did you try saying BEGIN WORK? I think you need to start with that, then you can end it with COMMIT

  • Maybe you just shouldn't use BEGIN or COMMIT cause those statements are used to provide control over the use of transactions. You could try saying START TRANSACTION instead of BEGIN if you want this to remain as a transaction. Starting with BEGIN could be making the parser treat it as the beginning of a BEGIN..END block – user8915618 Dec 27 '17 at 17:28
0

Try to start with:

BEGIN TRANSACTION;

Then end with:

END TRANSACTION;

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