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I am trying to create a loop for labeling variables. For that, I'm trying to use the following macro:

local diaglbl "=1 if high blood pressure diag" "=1 if mult diag high blood press" "=1 if coronary hrt disease diag" ///
"=1 if angina diagnosis" "=1 if heart attack diag" "=1 if other heart disease diag" "=1 if stroke diagnosis" ///
"=1 if emphysema diagnosis" "=1 if chronc bronchits last 12 mths" "=1 if high cholesterol diagnosis" ///
"=1 if cancer diagnosis" "=1 if diabetes diagnosis" "=1 if joint pain last 12 months" ///
"=1 if arthritis diagnosis" "=1 if asthma diagnosis"

Problem is that my outer quotations marks (only the first and the last) disappear when I check for macro using macro dir. I tried using `" at the beginning and "' at the end, but it still doesn't work. Is there a way to solve this, or is there a smarter way to automatically label multiple variables, but with different labels?

  • The issue might be that they are not on the same line, if you use the `" at the beginning and "' at the end and the whole command is on the same line it should work. – Eric HB Dec 28 '17 at 2:07
  • You should show the code that doesn't work. We can't guess the problem without it otherwise. – Nick Cox Dec 28 '17 at 10:02
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Perhaps the code below will point you in a helpful direction. However, in writing for myself, I find no advantage to coding this with loops rather than with multiple one-line commands. Indeed, it's awkward to know what label goes with what variable, and it opens the door to making mistakes. I would use one line per command in work that I cared about. A loop is not simpler, in my opinion.

The sentence in the answer above from one angry researcher about needing to define the entire macro on a single line pertains to your newlabels local macro which itself contains quoted strings. My code below works around the problem by using the #delimit command to allow a single "line" of Stata code to span multiple lines of text, with compound quotation marks wrapped around them. I will add that while my code shows each label on a separate line, you can put more than one on each line, as you did in the sample from which this was derived.

clear
set obs 1
generate actlim = 1
generate age = 1
#delimit ;
local newvars 
    actlim
    age
    ;
local newlabels `"
    "actlim label"
    "age label"
    "'
    ;
#delimit cr
local nv : word count `newvars'
forvalues i = 1/`nv' {
    local v : word `i' of `newvars'
    local l : word `i' of `newlabels'
    label variable `v' "`l'"
}
describe
  • Thank you, this is what I needed! – Stefan Vukojević Jan 2 '18 at 10:18
  • Good. If it works for you, "accepting" my answer will increase your reputation, as well as mine, on Stack Exchange. You should see a check mark at the top left of each of the answers, underneath the vote up/down arrows. – user4690969 Jan 2 '18 at 16:29
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You'll need to use `" and "' to delimit the local macro.

local part1 `""=1 if high blood pressure diag" "=1 if mult diag high blood press" "=1 if coronary hrt disease diag""'
local part2 `""=1 if angina diagnosis" "=1 if heart attack diag" "=1 if other heart disease diag" "=1 if stroke diagnosis""'
local part3 `""=1 if emphysema diagnosis" "=1 if chronc bronchits last 12 mths" "=1 if high cholesterol diagnosis""'
local part4 `""=1 if cancer diagnosis" "=1 if diabetes diagnosis" "=1 if joint pain last 12 months""'
local part5 `""=1 if arthritis diagnosis" "=1 if asthma diagnosis""'

local diaglbl = `"`part1' `part2' `part3' `part4' `part5'"'          

macro dir

In this case you will indeed either have to define the whole macro on a single line, or do it in parts and merge the parts afterwards as illustrated above.

Sources at Statalist: (1), (2)

0

Another answer is there is little obvious gain in working this way at all. You have several text strings prepared as variable labels. Putting them all in one bag (here a macro) is for no purpose, unless your variable names have very simple structure. You tell us nothing about that so we can't help on how to loop over the names. You just have to take the labels out of the bag again.

A plain but practical approach is just to have a series of commands

label var hbp "=1 if high blood pressure diag" 
label var mhbp "=1 if mult diag high blood press" 

Assuming yet further that these are indicator (dummy) variables simpler labels such as

label var hbp "high blood pressure diag" 
label var mhbp "mult high blood press" 

will help, just leaving you to explain once that 1 means that diagnosis and 0 not. That leaves more space for using full phrases, which would look much better in tables and on graphs.

General principles:

  1. Text that is identical doesn't help to distinguish.

  2. Loops are only good if they save you work and time.

Sure, you have to type label var repeatedly, but your favourite text editor should make that easy.

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