-1

I'm trying to create a helper function which will take a map with string keys and return a slice of the map keys.

The problem is that I want the function to not care about the type of the map values.

For example:

stringStringMap := map[string]string{
    "one": "first",
    "two": "second"
}

mapKeys(stringStringMap) // ["one", "two"]

stringIntMap := map[string]int{
    "one": 1,
    "two": 2,
}

mapKeys(strinIntMap) // ["one", "two"]

It seems that the only way around this problem is to create two similar helpers. Something like this:

func mapKeys(m map[string]string) []string {
    ...
}

func mapKeys2(m map[string]int) []string {
    ...
}

But this seems ugly. Is this helper function I'm trying to create possible?If not, is there a good convention I should follow when writing this?

  • Why the downvote? How should I be constructing my questions better? – Sam Houston Dec 27 '17 at 23:43
  • 2
    I haven't down voted, but I would imagine the down votes are for the normal reason: lack of research effort. – Flimzy Dec 28 '17 at 10:00
  • Fair enough, next time I'll spend more time with a programming language before asking any questions – Sam Houston Dec 28 '17 at 10:21
  • If you declare your maps as map[string]interface{}, then you can iterate over keys (which are strings in all cases) with a unique function. – coredump Dec 29 '17 at 20:50
1

There is a third option not mentioned yet, and that is to use a type switch. This may be a good option if you know that you'll be passing a manageable number of types to the function. It would work like this:

func Keys(m interface{}) ([]string, error) {
    switch t := m.(type) {
    case map[string]string:
        keys := make([]string, 0, len(t))
        for key := range t {
            keys = append(keys, key)
        }
        return keys, nil
    case map[string]int:
        keys := make([]string, 0, len(t))
        for key := range t {
            keys = append(keys, key)
        }
        return keys, nil
    default:
        return nil, fmt.Errorf("unknown map type: %T", m)
    }
}

This still gives you a bunch of seemingly duplicate code, but at least it's all behind a single function name, and it's more efficient than reflection.

  • Why "seemingly"? The code clearly is duplicated. – coredump Dec 29 '17 at 10:00
  • @coredump: That depends on perspective. On the screen, the code is seemingly duplicated, but the semantics, and the machine-readable code are not, due to different types. The first for loop is really for var key string = ... and the second is for var key int = .... – Flimzy Dec 29 '17 at 10:03
  • @coredump: Some of the code could be de-duplicated. keys could be defined before the switch (but then one won't know what size to make it, hurting efficiency), or one could move the return to after the switch. Both of these options hurt readability, though. But they are options, if one wants to be pedantic :) But the for loops, despite appearing duplicate, really aren't. – Flimzy Dec 29 '17 at 10:04
  • It seems that if you want to change how you build keys for string and use a doubly-linked list instead, you are going to change it for int too. That's pretty much the definition of code duplication (wiki.c2.com/?DuplicatedCode, en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Duplicate_code). Even if the clones might lead each to different machine code, this does not change the fact that what the programmer manipulates, the source, is duplicated; the logic for adding keys is the same. Also, I am not sure the ranges are different: after all, you only iterate over keys. – coredump Dec 29 '17 at 15:02
  • @coredump: I welcome you to provide your own, better answer. – Flimzy Dec 29 '17 at 17:12
3

A way to solve this problem is to use "interface{}" when creating the maps and then use a type switch statement in the method i.e.

func mapKeys(m map[string]interface{}) []string {
    for k,v := range m {
        switch a := v.(type) {
        case int:
          ... do int stuff
        case string:
          ... do string stuff
        }
    }
}
2

Go does not have user specified generic parameter types, so what you are describing must be done via:

  1. Separate functions that accept the different types you wish to support, or
  2. A function that accepts the empty interface (interface{}) and uses reflection.

Here is an example implementation of the second approach:

package main

import (
    "fmt"
    "reflect"
)

func main() {
    stringStringMap := map[string]string{
        "one": "first",
        "two": "second",
    }

    fmt.Println(mapKeys(stringStringMap)) // ["one", "two"]

    stringIntMap := map[string]int{
        "one": 1,
        "two": 2,
    }

    fmt.Println(mapKeys(stringIntMap)) // ["one", "two"]
}

func mapKeys(m interface{}) []string {
    v := reflect.ValueOf(m)
    if v.Kind() != reflect.Map {
        panic("m is not a map")
    }
    if v.Type().Key().Kind() != reflect.String {
        panic("m does not have a string key")
    }
    keys := make([]string, 0, v.Len())
    for _, key := range v.MapKeys() {
        keys = append(keys, key.String())
    }
    return keys
}

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