15

When I do

Rails.logger.debug "hello world" from within my rake tasks I want it to log to standard out.

How do I set the rails logger to Logger.new(STDOUT) from within my rake task?

I want my app to log to the file when coming through controllers etc, just want the rake tasks to go to std out because of the way my monitoring is setup.

I was thinking I could define another environment and use that config, but probably overkill, I want all the same environment vars in each env, just want to change the location of my log destination.

For now I have a log helper that uses puts, but I want to take advantage of the formatting of rails logs and the buffering.

3 Answers 3

11

I just did Rails.logger = Logger.new(STDOUT) and that also worked (rails3)

8

You can reset the default logger this way:

RAILS_DEFAULT_LOGGER = Logger.new(STDOUT)

You can also set the logger for specific parts of your application (ActiveRecord, ActionController...) like this:

ActiveRecord::Base.logger = Logger.new(STDOUT)
7
  • Tried this and got: /lib/tasks/fetch_influencers.rake:4: dynamic constant assignment RAILS_DEFAULT_LOGGER = Logger.new(STDOUT) (I think your solution works in rails3, I need a rails2 solution)
    – Joelio
    Jan 26, 2011 at 12:29
  • Was that a warning or an error? You'll get a warning if you do this because you are changing a constant, but you should still be able to do it. Jan 26, 2011 at 16:18
  • 1
    lib/tasks/fetch_data.rake:4: dynamic constant assignment RAILS_DEFAULT_LOGGER = Logger.new(STDOUT)
    – Joelio
    Mar 23, 2011 at 18:04
  • That's correct, you'll get a warning, but you won't get an error. So you can still do this without your application raising an error. Mar 23, 2011 at 18:18
  • 1
    This definitely doesn't work in Ruby 1.8.7 in a Rails unit test: Uncaught exception: test/unit/foo_test.rb:30: dynamic constant assignment: RAILS_DEFAULT_LOGGER = Logger.new(StringIO.new) Mar 31, 2011 at 13:01
-1

With rails 4 you will be using the gem rails_12factor. Place this into your Gemfile and voilà! gem 'rails_12factor_'

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