32

So Belady's Anomaly states that when using a FIFO page replacement policy, when adding more page space we'll have more page faults.

My intuition says that we should less or at most, the same number of page faults as we add more page space.

If we think of a FIFO queue as a pipe, adding more page space is like making the pipe bigger:

 ____
O____O  size 4

 ________
O________O  size 8

So, why would you get more page faults? My intuition says that with a longer pipe, you'd take a bit longer to start having page faults (so, with an infinite pipe you'd have no page faults) and then you'd have just as many page faults and just as often as with a smaller pipe.

What is wrong with my reasoning?

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  • 1
    Not sure exactly what you're looking for here -- the WP page has an actual example: en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Belady's_anomaly – Ken Jan 26 '11 at 0:20
  • 4
    Have you read the Wikipedia article? It is called an anomaly because it runs counter to most people's intuition. :) – Fred Nurk Jan 26 '11 at 0:22
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    In this particular case, having more page frames caused the algorithm to keep pages around longer that end up being used less frequently later, and they don't drop out of the FIFO fast enough to free up space for pages that actually end up being needed. But I don't know that there's a general intuition you can get from this. That's just what can happen. – Ken Jan 26 '11 at 0:24
  • "In this particular case, having more page frames caused the algorithm to keep pages around longer that end up being used less frequently later" I fail to understand how that can make any kind of difference. Why would it better to not just have them in memory at all(what happens when you have a smaller pipe) – devoured elysium Jan 26 '11 at 0:41
  • devoured: In this case, sure, it would have been better, but a FIFO can't predict the future. Did you work through the example on wikipedia? – Ken Jan 27 '11 at 18:45
34

The reason that when using FIFO, increasing the number of pages can increase the fault rate in some access patterns, is because when you have more pages, recently requested pages can remain at the bottom of the FIFO queue longer.

Consider the third time that "3" is requested in the wikipedia example here: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Belady%27s_anomaly

Page faults are marked with an "f".

1:

Page Requests   3    2    1    0    3    2    4    3    2    1    0    4
Newest Page     3f   2f   1f   0f   3f   2f   4f   4    4    1f   0f   0
                     3    2    1    0    3    2    2    2    4    1    1
Oldest Page               3    2    1    0    3    3    3    2    4    4

2:

Page Requests   3    2    1    0    3    2    4    3    2    1    0    4
Newest Page     3f   2f   1f   0f   0    0    4f   3f   2f   1f   0f   4f
                     3    2    1    1    1    0    4    3    2    1    0
                          3    2    2    2    1    0    4    3    2    1
Oldest Page                    3    3    3    2    1    0    4    3    2

In the first example (with fewer pages), there are 9 page faults.

In the second example (with more pages), there are 10 page faults.

When using FIFO, increasing the size of the cache changes the order in which items are removed. Which in some cases, can increase the fault rate.

Belady's Anomaly does not state anything about the general trend of fault rates with respect to cache size. So your reasoning (about viewing the cache as a pipe), in the general case is not wrong.

In summary: Belady's Anomaly points out that it is possible to exploit the fact that larger cache sizes can cause items in the cache to be raised in the FIFO queue later than smaller cache sizes, in order to cause larger cache sizes to have a higher fault rate under a particular (and possibly rare) access pattern.

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  • but when 3 was accesed second time then in second case it was in cache and in first it was not – Utkarsh Srivastav Apr 20 '12 at 9:55
  • can you please explain the example? those numbers in example are not making any sense to me. Not able to see the pattern, get their meaning :( – Mahesha999 Jan 30 '16 at 10:38
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    well got it...thanks to this lecture...youtube FTW :) – Mahesha999 Jan 30 '16 at 10:46
  • Can it occur in algorithms other than FIFO? – User Apr 25 '16 at 15:29
  • @Olhovsky, re "bottom"; Shouldn't they be brought to the top on-access? – Pacerier Oct 22 '19 at 22:27
7

This statement is wrong because it is overgeneralized:

Belady's Anomaly states that when using a FIFO page replacement policy, when adding more page space we'll have more page faults

This is a corrected version:

"Belady's Anomaly states that when using a FIFO page replacement policy, when adding more page space, some memory access patterns will actually result in more page faults."

In other words... whether the anomaly is observed depends on the actual memory access pattern.

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  • 3
    Does this only occur in the FIFO algorithm? – User Apr 25 '16 at 15:30
  • What about Random Page Replacement Algorithm? Does it suffer from Belady's Anomaly? – sameerkn Feb 16 '17 at 7:00
  • @sameerkn I would say it does not. With Random Page Replacement, the behavior is random every time regardless of the memory access pattern. And how often it faults is also a random variable. Adding more space would not be expected to result in more page faults on average... – Tim Lovell-Smith Feb 17 '17 at 21:42
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    But atleast once if RPR algo mimics Belady Anomaly then the algorithm is said to suffer from anomaly. FIFO doesn't always suffer from anomaly. Consider what if RPR algo mimics FIFO algorithm? – sameerkn Feb 20 '17 at 5:47
1

Belady's anomaly occurs in page replacement algorithm do not follow stack algorithm.That is the pages when frames were less should be a subset of pages when frame are more.On increasing page frame,the page frames which were present before has to be there.This can occur in FIFO sometimes,even random page replacement but not LRU or optimal.

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-1

In short about Belady's Anomaly we can say "Adding more frames can cause more page faults".

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-2

Belady's anomaly happens in a FIFO scheme only when the page that is currently being referred is the page that was removed last from the main memory. only in this case even though you increase more page space, you'll have more page faults.

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  • Does it only happen in FIFO? – User Apr 25 '16 at 15:30

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