19

I want to infinitely repeat T elements in a Sequence<T>. This can't be done using kotlin.collections.asSequence. For example:

val intArray = intArrayOf(1, 2, 3)
val finiteIntSequence = intArray.asSequence()
val many = 10
finiteIntSequence.take(many).forEach(::print)
// 123

This is not what I want. I expected some kind of kotlin.collections.repeat function to exist, but there isn't, so I implemented one myself (e.g. for this IntArray):

var i = 0
val infiniteIntSequence = generateSequence { intArray[i++ % intArray.size] }
infiniteIntSequence.take(many).forEach(::print)
// 1231231231

This is quite imperative, so I feel there must be a more functional and less verbose way to do this. If it exists, what is/are Kotlin's standard way(s) to repeat collections / arrays a(n) (in)finite amount of times?

0

6 Answers 6

22

Update: coroutines are no longer experimental as of Kotlin 1.3! Use them as much as you like :)


If you allow the use of coroutines you can do this in a pretty clean way using sequence:

an infinite amount of times

fun <T> Sequence<T>.repeat() = sequence { while (true) yieldAll(this@repeat) }

Note the use of a qualified this expression this@repeat - simply using this would refer to the lambda's receiver, a SequenceScope.

then you can do

val intArray = intArrayOf(1, 2, 3)
val finiteIntSequence = intArray.asSequence()
val infiniteIntSequence = finiteIntSequence.repeat()

println(infiniteIntSequence.take(10).toList())
// ^ [1, 2, 3, 1, 2, 3, 1, 2, 3, 1]

a finite amount of times

fun <T> Sequence<T>.repeat(n: Int) = sequence { repeat(n) { yieldAll(this@repeat) } }
4
  • 1
    Or repeat(n) { yieldAll(...) }
    – voddan
    Commented Dec 28, 2017 at 12:50
  • 2
    @voddan Thanks, this is definitely cleaner and arguably more readable :)
    – Salem
    Commented Dec 28, 2017 at 12:51
  • I'm accepting this as coroutines are the way to go since their stable release, although they do require an extra dependency. Edit: not sure if an extra dependency is needed, though, because sequence comes from here: kotlinlang.org/api/latest/jvm/stdlib/kotlin.sequences/…
    – Erik
    Commented Dec 3, 2018 at 20:08
  • @Erik yep, sequence builders are part of the standard library now. IIRC kotlinx.coroutines mostly contains utilities (such as await extensions for various types of futures).
    – Salem
    Commented Jan 13, 2019 at 8:59
5

To avoid using the experimental coroutines, use:

generateSequence { setOf("foo", 'b', 'a', 'r') }
  .flatten() // Put the Iterables' contents into one Sequence
  .take(5) // Take 5 elements
  .joinToString(", ")

// Result: "foo, b, a, r, foo"

or alternatively, if you want to repeat the entire collection a number of times, just take before flattening:

generateSequence { setOf("foo", 'b', 'a', 'r') }
  .take(5) // Take the entire Iterable 5 times
  .flatten() // Put the Iterables' contents into one Sequence
  .joinToString(", ")

// Result: "foo, b, a, r, foo, b, a, r, foo, b, a, r, foo, b, a, r, foo, b, a, r"

For the original question's IntArray, the array first must be converted to an Iterable<Int> (otherwise flatten() isn't available):

val intArray = intArrayOf(1, 2, 3)

generateSequence { intArray.asIterable() }
  .flatten()
  .take(10)
  .joinToString(", ")

// Result: "1, 2, 3, 1, 2, 3, 1, 2, 3, 1"

Furthermore, other types of Array, e.g. ByteArray or LongArray, as well as Map are not Iterable, but they all implement the asIterable() method like IntArray in the example above.

3

I think this is pretty clear:

generateSequence(0) { (it + 1) % intArray.size }
        .map { intArray[it] }
        .forEach { println(it) }
4
  • 1
    Your answer can be used to generate a sequence of Int values, but I'm interested in repeating an arbitrary collection or array of any type, e.g. Collection<Person>. By default, there is no Person.plus(other: Number), so this is not the answer I'm looking for. This is what I intended to say with the first sentence of my question: I want to repeat a collection or array of any type T infinitely.
    – Erik
    Commented Dec 28, 2017 at 13:39
  • 1
    Ah, I'm sorry I misinterpreted your answer! You're right, this is generic and doesn't require coroutines, which is a great alternative for the Mango's answer. Thanks, have my upvote.
    – Erik
    Commented Dec 28, 2017 at 13:44
  • 1
    Still, I think the Kotlin standard lib should contain some kind of repeat() and repeat(times: Int) methods.
    – Erik
    Commented Dec 28, 2017 at 13:45
  • Added another more generic answer
    – s1m0nw1
    Commented Dec 28, 2017 at 13:51
3

I'm unsure if this is due to API changes in Kotlin, but it's possible to do the following:

fun <T> Sequence<T>.repeatForever() =
  generateSequence(this) { it }.flatten()

Live example: https://pl.kotl.in/W-h1dnCFx

4
  • If I'm not mistaken this is basically a less verbose version of this answer, but using an extension and using flatMap instead of flatten. Example: pl.kotl.in/EbpEdBT6W
    – Erik
    Commented May 9, 2019 at 5:35
  • Good point, I forgot about flatten, I'll update. However, using this creates a GeneratorSequence instead of relying on an infinite loop and coroutines for it which I'm not sure about efficiency but at the very least, having a while(true) sounds some alarms on my head (probably unfounded though)
    – pablisco
    Commented May 9, 2019 at 6:21
  • Note that I referred to a different answer than the one containing infinite loops!
    – Erik
    Commented May 9, 2019 at 12:32
  • 2
    Also note that using infinite loops in sequence generation where the loop contains yield or yieldAll is not necessarily alarming, because these functions are suspending and will therefore only loop forever if polled forever. Unless the infinite loops contain other 'dangerous' (e.g. computationally heavy) code, they are safe to use.
    – Erik
    Commented May 9, 2019 at 12:36
2

A generic solution would be to reuse the proposal from this answer with extension functions:

fun <T> Array<T>.asRepeatedSequence() =
        generateSequence(0) {
            (it + 1) % this.size
        }.map(::get)

fun <T> List<T>.asRepeatedSequence() =
        generateSequence(0) {
            (it + 1) % this.size
        }.map(::get)

Called like this:

intArray.asRepeatedSequence().forEach(::println)
0

If you happen to have Guava on your classpath, you can do the following:

val intArray = intArrayOf(1, 2, 3)
val cyclingSequence = Iterators.cycle(intArray.asList()).asSequence()

// prints 1,2,3,1,2,3,1,2,3,1
println(cyclingSequence.take(10).joinToString(","))

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