I have a Perl 6 code where I am doing the following:

if ($line ~~ /^\s*#/) { print "matches\n"; }

I'm getting this error:

===SORRY!===
Regex not terminated.
at line 2
------> <BOL>�<EOL>
Unable to parse regex; couldn't find final '/'
at line 2
------> <BOL>�<EOL>
    expecting any of:
        infix stopper

This is part of a Perl 5 code:

if ($line =~ /^\s*#/)

It used to work fine to identify lines that have an optional space and a #.

What's causing this error in Perl 6?

up vote 3 down vote accepted

A hash # is used as a comment marker in Perl 6 regexes.

Add a backslash \ to escape it like this

if ( $line =~ /^\s*\#/ )
  • yes. works. thanks! – BhaskarS Dec 29 '17 at 13:50

In Perl 6, everything from a lone1 # to the end of the line is considered a comment, even inside regexes.

To avoid this, make it a string literal by placing it inside quotes:

if $line ~~ / ^ \s* '#' / { say "matches"; }

(Escaping with \ should also work, but Rakudo seems to have a parsing bug which makes that not work when preceded by a space. And quoting the character as shown here is the recommended way anyway – Perl 6 specifically introduced quoted strings inside regexes and made spaces insignificant by default, in order to avoid the backslash clutter that many Perl 5 regexes suffer from.)

More generally, all non-alphanumeric characters need to be quoted or escaped inside Perl 6 regexes in order to match them literally.
This is another deliberate non-backwards-compatible change from Perl 5, where this is a bit more complicated. In Perl 6 there is a simple rule:

  • alphanumeric --> matches literally only when not escaped.
    (When escaped, they either have special meanings, e.g. \s etc., or are forbidden.)

  • non-alphanumeric --> matches literally only when escaped.
    (When not escaped, they either have special meanings, e.g. ., +, #, etc., or are forbidden.)


1 'Lone' meaning not part of a larger token such as a quoted string or the opener of an embedded comment.

  • A hash within a regex signals a comment only until the next newline or the end of the pattern, whichever comes first. – Borodin Dec 29 '17 at 15:42
  • "you pretty much had to memorize the whole list". No. You can escape every non-word character quite safely if you wish. That is what quotemeta does after all. – Borodin Dec 29 '17 at 15:46
  • @Borodin "A hash within a regex signals a comment only until the next newline or the end of the pattern, whichever comes first." Are you speaking of P5? I'm pretty sure that in P6 "a lone #" works as smls says. (I've added a footnote to smls' answer to cover an embedded comment but that's a minor detail -- smls may decide to revert my edit so I've left the link explaining that minor detail here in this comment too.) – raiph Dec 29 '17 at 15:57
  • @Borodin "You can escape every non-word character quite safely if you wish." But you have to decide to do it. Imo the specific rules in P5 are complex, and you have to either know them to know whether you need to apply quotemeta, or just apply quotemeta every time you're not sure. – raiph Dec 29 '17 at 16:12
  • @Borodin: Fair enough. I've updated the answer to weaken that claim about Perl 5. – smls Dec 31 '17 at 11:03

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