I need to set a key combination for my app so that I can call stopLockTask() that I have already started. How can I do that? I can use the following code to do that using Shift + Left Arrow.

@Override
public boolean onKeyDown(int keyCode, KeyEvent event) {
    //Read the input and display its code

    switch (keyCode) {
        case KeyEvent.KEYCODE_HOME:

            mTextView.setText("Home");
            break;
        case KeyEvent.KEYCODE_DPAD_LEFT:
            if (event.isShiftPressed()) {
                Toast.makeText(this, "You pressed left + Shift", Toast.LENGTH_SHORT).show();
                stopLockTask();
            }
            break;


        default:
            char c = event.getDisplayLabel();
            String code = String.valueOf(keyCode);
            String displayText = c + " " + keyCode;
            mTextView.setText(displayText);
            mTextView.setBackgroundColor(mColor ^= Color.GREEN);

    }

    return true;
}

But, how can I do that without Shift or Ctrl or Alt because meta keys are not available on a remote controller? I only have the keys available on an Android TV remote controller. Is there a way to define a certain key sequence (e.g. Left + Left + Up + OK)?

You could keep in a variable the current time of the key press.

For example, to keep if all numbers 0, 1 and 2 was pressed, you could do the following:

@Override
public boolean onKeyDown(int keyCode, KeyEvent event) {
    switch (keyCode) {
        case KeyEvent.KEYCODE_NUMPAD_0:
            numpad0Time = Date.now();
            break;
        case KeyEvent.KEYCODE_NUMPAD_0:
            numpad1Time = Date.now();
            break;
        case KeyEvent.KEYCODE_NUMPAD_0:
            numpad2Time = Date.now();
            break;
    }

    checkKeys();

    return true;
}

private void checkKeys() {
    long now = Date.now();
    if(now - numpad0Time < 500 && 
       now - numpad1Time < 500 && 
       now - numpad2Time < 500) {
         stopLockTask();
    }
}

This way you can check if all keys was pressed in a 500 miliseconds timestamp.

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