20

I have static class full of extension methods where each of the methods is asynchronous and returns some value - like this:

public static class MyContextExtensions{
  public static async Task<bool> SomeFunction(this DbContext myContext){
    bool output = false;
    //...doing stuff with myContext
    return output;
  }

  public static async Task<List<string>> SomeOtherFunction(this DbContext myContext){
    List<string> output = new List<string>();
    //...doing stuff with myContext
    return output;
  }
}

My goal is to be able to invoke any of these methods from a single method in another class and return their result as an object. It would look something like this:

public class MyHub: Hub{
  public async Task<object> InvokeContextExtension(string methodName){
    using(var context = new DbContext()){
      //This fails because of invalid cast
      return await (Task<object>)typeof(MyContextExtensions).GetMethod(methodName).Invoke(null, context);
    }
  }
}

The problem is that the cast fails. My dilemma is that I cannot pass any type parameters to the "InvokeContextExtension" method because it is part of a SignalR hub and is invoked by javascript. And to a certain extent I don't care about the return type of the extension method because it is just going to get serialized to JSON and sent back to the javascript client. However I do have to cast the value returned by Invoke as a Task in order to use the await operator. And I have to supply a generic parameter with that "Task" otherwise it will treat the return type as void. So it all comes down to how do I successfully cast Task with generic parameter T to a Task with a generic parameter of object where T represents the output of the extension method.

  • 2
    Why not use the base class, Task? You will have to do reflection to get the result out again anyway. Or write some method to paper over the differences for you: async Task<object> GetResult<TResult>(Task<TResult> task) { return await task; } – ta.speot.is Dec 30 '17 at 12:05
17

You can do it in two steps - await the task using the base class, then harvest the result using reflection or dynamic:

using(var context = new DbContext()) {
    // Get the task
    Task task = (Task)typeof(MyContextExtensions).GetMethod(methodName).Invoke(null, context);
    // Make sure it runs to completion
    await task.ConfigureAwait(false);
    // Harvest the result
    return (object)((dynamic)task).Result;
}

Here is a complete running example that puts in context the above technique of calling Task through reflection:

class MainClass {
    public static void Main(string[] args) {
        var t1 = Task.Run(async () => Console.WriteLine(await Bar("Foo1")));
        var t2 = Task.Run(async () => Console.WriteLine(await Bar("Foo2")));
        Task.WaitAll(t1, t2);
    }
    public static async Task<object> Bar(string name) {
        Task t = (Task)typeof(MainClass).GetMethod(name).Invoke(null, new object[] { "bar" });
        await t.ConfigureAwait(false);
        return (object)((dynamic)t).Result;
    }
    public static Task<string> Foo1(string s) {
        return Task.FromResult("hello");
    }
    public static Task<bool> Foo2(string s) {
        return Task.FromResult(true);
    }
}
  • This is great, but what if I have a Task object that could be either a Task or a Task<T> type? If I cast it to a dynamic, how do I check if it has a Result property, other than catching a RuntimeBinderException exception? – Paul Knopf Jul 26 '18 at 23:39
  • @PaulKnopf You need to check the argument first and throw exception if the task is not a result task. – shtse8 Jul 31 '18 at 20:13
12

In general, to convert a Task<T> to Task<object>, I would simply go for the straightforward continuation mapping :

Task<T> yourTaskT;

// ....

Task<object> yourTaskObject = yourTaskT.ContinueWith(t => (object) t.Result);

(documentation link here)


However, your actual specific need is to invoke a Task by reflection and obtain its (unknown type) result .

For this, you can refer to the complete dasblinkenlight's answer, which should fit your exact problem.

  • 1
    OP's problem is that he is invoking the task through reflection, so he has no T, and cannot make yourTaskT. The best he can do is Task, but then he wouldn't be able to do t.Result inside ContinueWith. – dasblinkenlight Dec 30 '17 at 13:07
  • yep. unfortunately, it seems I focused too much on the title general question instead of the actual OP's problem. – Pac0 Dec 30 '17 at 13:08
  • I agree, the title and the question are not in a perfect alignment with each other. The title is straightforward, but the question has an important twist. While your answer may not solve OP's problem, it is a perfect match for the current title. I wouldn't delete it - instead, I'd edit to add a second part that shows how to invoke a task with unknown result type via reflection. – dasblinkenlight Dec 30 '17 at 13:20
  • Thanks for suggestion. I added a link to your answer, can't think of anything better for this 'second part' , and not really fond of copying other's answers into mines. – Pac0 Dec 30 '17 at 13:30
3

You cannot cast Task<T> to Task<object>, because Task<T> is not covariant (it's not contravariant, either). The simplest solution would be to use some more reflection:

var task   = (Task) mi.Invoke (obj, null) ;
var result = task.GetType ().GetProperty ("Result").GetValue (task) ;

This is slow and inefficient, but usable if this code is not executed often. As an aside, what is the use of having an asynchronous MakeMyClass1 method if you are going to block waiting for its result?

and Another possibility is to write an extension method to this purpose:

  public static Task<object> Convert<T>(this Task<T> task)
    {
        TaskCompletionSource<object> res = new TaskCompletionSource<object>();

        return task.ContinueWith(t =>
        {
            if (t.IsCanceled)
            {
                res.TrySetCanceled();
            }
            else if (t.IsFaulted)
            {
                res.TrySetException(t.Exception);
            }
            else
            {
                res.TrySetResult(t.Result);
            }
            return res.Task;
        }
        , TaskContinuationOptions.ExecuteSynchronously).Unwrap();
    }

It is none-blocking solution and will preserve original state/exception of the Task.

  • 1
    While your first solution will definitely work, OP wouldn't be able to take advantage of your second solution, because he does not have a T for this Task<T> task part of the invocation. – dasblinkenlight Dec 30 '17 at 13:11
  • @dasblinkenlight its just for the futures :) maybe someone else come at this point and need that one. I just wanted to have a complete answer. of course I said "Another possibility". thank you for responding duo. – M.R.Safari Dec 30 '17 at 13:12
  • 1
    This is a nice solution in that it preserves cancelation state. If you didn't care about that then public static async Task<object> Convert<T>(this Task<T> t) => await t; is nicely concise. – Eric Lippert Dec 30 '17 at 16:52
  • @M.R.Safari thanks for this solution. I had already marked dasblinkenlight's solution as the answer but this one does work as well. I'm not sure if there is any performance difference in the two. – ncarriker Jan 2 '18 at 13:22
  • @M.R.Safari, I also wanted to answer your side question: the extension methods get invoked from server side logic as well as the signalR hub so sometimes they are awaited and other times they are not. The hub method is async because even though it must await the results of the extension methods in the real code there are other non-awaited tasks that get called as well. – ncarriker Jan 2 '18 at 13:33
2

I'd like to provide an implementation which is IMHO the best combination of the earlier answers:

  • precise argument handling
  • no dynamic dispatch
  • general purpose extension method

Here you go:

/// <summary> 
/// Casts a <see cref="Task"/> to a <see cref="Task{TResult}"/>. 
/// This method will throw an <see cref="InvalidCastException"/> if the specified task 
/// returns a value which is not identity-convertible to <typeparamref name="T"/>. 
/// </summary>
public static async Task<T> Cast<T>(this Task task)
{
    if (task == null)
        throw new ArgumentNullException(nameof(task));
    if (!task.GetType().IsGenericType || task.GetType().GetGenericTypeDefinition() != typeof(Task<>))
        throw new ArgumentException("An argument of type 'System.Threading.Tasks.Task`1' was expected");

    await task.ConfigureAwait(false);

    object result = task.GetType().GetProperty(nameof(Task<object>.Result)).GetValue(task);
    return (T)result;
}
1

This is not a good idea to mix await with dynamic/reflection invoke since await is a compiler instruction that generates a lot of code around invoked method and there is no real sense to "emulate" compiler work with more reflections, continuations, wrappers and etc.

Since what you need is to manage your code at RUN TIME then forget the asyc await syntax sugar which works at compile time. Rewrite SomeFunction and SomeOtherFunction without them, and start operations in your own tasks created at run time. You will get the same behavior but with crystal clear code.

  • I appreciate your insight and I can see where this would be the ideal implementation in a lot of situations. Unfortunately it's not a practical solution for me at this moment because the async pattern has already been established and would have a significant ripple effect on a number of projects and I would have some unhappy team members if changed it right now. – ncarriker Jan 2 '18 at 14:25
1

For the best approach, without using reflection and dynamic ugly syntax, and without passing generic types. I would use two extension methods for achieving this goal.

    public static async Task<object> CastToObject<T>([NotNull] this Task<T> task)
    {
        return await task.ConfigureAwait(false);
    }

    public static async Task<TResult> Cast<TResult>([NotNull] this Task<object> task)
    {
        return (TResult) await task.ConfigureAwait(false);
    }

Usage:

    Task<T1> task ...
    Task<T2> task2 = task.CastToObject().Cast<T2>();

This my second approach, but not recommended:

public static async Task<TResult> Cast<TSource, TResult>([NotNull] this Task<TSource> task, TResult dummy = default)
{
    return (TResult)(object) await task.ConfigureAwait(false);
}

Usage:

Task<T1> task ...
Task<T2> task2 = task.Cast((T2) default);

// Or

Task<T2> task2 = task.Cast<T1, T2>();

This my third approach, but not recommended: (similar to second one)

public static async Task<TResult> Cast<TSource, TResult>([NotNull] this Task<TSource> task, Type<TResult> type = null)
{
    return (TResult)(object) await task.ConfigureAwait(false);
}

// Dummy type class
public class Type<T>
{
}

public static class TypeExtension
{
    public static Type<T> ToGeneric<T>(this T source)
    {
        return new Type<T>();
    }
}

Usage:

Task<T1> task ...
Task<T2> task2 = task.Cast(typeof(T2).ToGeneric());

// Or

Task<T2> task2 = task.Cast<T1, T2>();
  • None of the code snippeds actually solve the problem of having one "Task" without generics and get its result! – JPVenson Dec 18 '18 at 12:24
1

I made a little extension method based on dasblinkenlight's answer:

public static class TaskExtension
{
    public async static Task<T> Cast<T>(this Task task)
    { 
        if (!task.GetType().IsGenericType) throw new InvalidOperationException();

        await task.ConfigureAwait(false);

        // Harvest the result. Ugly but works
        return (T)((dynamic)task).Result;
    }
}

Usage:

Task<Foo> task = ...
Task<object> = task.Cast<object>();

This way you can change T in Task<T> to anything you want.

  • You should check the argument to prevent from passing void task. – shtse8 Jul 31 '18 at 20:13
  • @shtse8 is something like if(task == null) throw new ArgumentNullException() enough? – Mariusz Jamro Aug 1 '18 at 6:29
  • if (!task.GetType().IsGenericType) throw new InvalidOperationException(); because type may be void task without any Result property causing runtime exception thrown. – shtse8 Aug 1 '18 at 7:00
0

The most efficient approach would be custom awaiter:

struct TaskCast<TSource, TDestination>
    where TSource : TDestination
{
    readonly Task<TSource> task;

    public TaskCast(Task<TSource> task)
    {
        this.task = task;
    }

    public Awaiter GetAwaiter() => new Awaiter(task);

    public struct Awaiter
        : System.Runtime.CompilerServices.INotifyCompletion
    {
        System.Runtime.CompilerServices.TaskAwaiter<TSource> awaiter;

        public Awaiter(Task<TSource> task)
        {
            awaiter = task.GetAwaiter();
        }

        public bool IsCompleted => awaiter.IsCompleted;    
        public TDestination GetResult() => awaiter.GetResult();    
        public void OnCompleted(Action continuation) => awaiter.OnCompleted(continuation);
    }
}

with the following usage:

Task<...> someTask = ...;
await TaskCast<..., object>(someTask);

The limitation of this approach is that the result is not a Task<object> but an awaitable object.

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