30

In my scenario I have mouseover and mouseout events that I want to bind to conditionally (e.g only if user is on a device that has a mouse).

I realize I can have the condition in the event handler itself but that would still be allocating the memory for the event handlers which is unnecessary.

Is there a way to make the event binding itself conditional?

(to be clear, what I'd like is to be able to short-circuit the event subscription so the underlying addEventListener operation never happens if the condition is false)

3
  • 2
    You could use v-if hasMouse and have one branch with the events and the other without. Probably use scoped slots to insert the common code. – Roy J Dec 31 '17 at 13:17
  • That's OK for very simple components but if your template is substantial (I'm working with a complex SVG in this case) it becomes a pain – asi Jan 2 '18 at 10:10
  • The computed property looks to be a great answer. Is there a reason you don't want to type it up and mark it as the accepted answer? – Roy J Jan 2 '18 at 13:05
35

Update (February 2021)

Several solutions seem to be accepted on Github, whereas my original answer is not. I'm rounding them up here for convenience:

Solution 1a (see Engin Yapici's answer below):

v-on="enableClick ? { click: clickHandler } : {}"

Solution 1b (see Heals Legodi's answer below):

v-on="enableClick ? { click: () => clickHandler(params) } : {}"

Solution 2 (see rvy's answer below and this working demo)

@[eventName]="clickHandler"

Solution 3 (mentioned here, seems to be compatible with event modifiers):

@click="enableClick && clickHandler"

Original answer

This works as of Vue 2.6:

<div
  @mouseover="enableMouseover ? mouseoverHandler : null"
  @click="enableClick ? clickHandler : null"
  ...
>

While an event resolves to null, the binding will be removed.

https://github.com/vuejs/vue/issues/7349#issuecomment-458405684

Comments on original answer

It seems to be something I came up with accidentally by misunderstanding that Github thread. But I know from my own testing that it definitely worked back when I posted it. And people continued to upvote it right up to when I made this edit, implying the solution still had some merit. So give it a try if you like.

But after a downvote and a couple of negative comments, I felt the need to improve my answer to save future readers potential headaches. Note that pretty much all the answers to this question refer to the same Github thread, so if you've got time, you might want to go right to the source to learn more. There are many options discussed there, and I suspect more will continue to be posted over time.

4
  • 1
    Binding @click to null, now returns a warning from Vue: [Vue warn]: Invalid handler for event "click": got null. – Paul-Sebastian Manole May 1 '20 at 11:31
  • Should be the answer, most elegant way. – Aerodynamic Nov 27 '20 at 16:05
  • The syntax in this example doesn't seem to work. Not sure why it's so upvoted. Other answers are good. You need to use v-on="condition ? { click: handler } : {}" or actual dynamic name of event that resolves to null (but it probably need to be a computed field) – Mariusz Pawelski Jan 19 at 10:56
  • This is wrong. The linked issue on github shows the proper solution. – rve Jan 30 at 10:03
25

Following this discussion it appears the best way to achieve this is to bind v-on to a specification object containing the events you are interested in subscribing to and place your conditionals there like so:

<div v-on="{ mouseover: condition ? handler : null, click: ... }">

Some notes:

  • Passing null for a handler means the underlying addEventLisetener will not happen - which is what we want
  • This means grouping all the event subscriptions into one v-on attribute rather then splitting it into separate and explicit bindings (<div @mouseover='...' @click='...'/>)

  • If this is a long living component and the underlying data changes frequently (leading to rebinding) you should be paying attention to the disposal of the subscriptions (i.e the corresponding removeEventListener) as subscriptions made in one bind pass will not be disposed of on subsequent ones. Evaluate as per your use case...

1
15

This is what I'm using:

v-on="condition ? { click: handler } : {}" (Reference)

I get Invalid handler for event "click": got null with v-on="{ click: condition ? handler : null }"

2
  • I am trying this on a text-field but it isn't working for me yet it has worked for me before on a card. This time the event isn't added at all – Anjayluh Feb 27 '20 at 7:09
  • This is the only thing that worked for me on an anchor tag, on Vue 2.6.11. – Peter Lenjo Apr 5 '20 at 13:53
4

Even more simpler would be to use render functions for that. You won't need to be manually removing the listeners and taking care of them. Also uses simple JS syntax with no mixins.

new Vue({
  el: "#app",
  data: () => ({
    counter: 0
  }),
  methods: {
    handleClick() {
      this.counter++;
    }
  },
  render(h) {
    return h(
      "div",
      IS_MOBILE_DEVICE
        ? {}
        : {
            on: { click: this.handleClick }
          },
      this.counter
    );
  }
});

Full example: https://codesandbox.io/s/nw6vyo6knj

1
  • Render functions would work well for a very simple component but in some cases (I'm working with a complex SVG) are unmanageable – asi Jan 2 '18 at 10:08
3

If you want to do something like that you could just apply the event listener manually by adding a ref on the element you want to apply the event to, then using that to bind the event listener in the mounted hook if the condition is met:

Markup

<button ref="button">
  Mouse Over Me
</button>

Vue Instance

new Vue({
  el: '#app',
  mounted() {
    let hasMouse = true;

    // If the user has a mouse, add the event listeners
    if (hasMouse) {
      let button = this.$refs.button

      button.addEventListener('mouseover', e => {
        this.mouseover = true
      })

      button.addEventListener('mouseout', e => {
        this.mouseover = false
      })
    }

  },
  data: {
    mouseover: false
  }
})

Here's a JSFiddle for that: https://jsfiddle.net/0fderek6/

If you don't like that approach, you could also use a directive and place the conditional in there, you could then place that in a mixin to make it reusable:

Mixin

const mouseEvents = {
  directives: {
    mouseEvents: {
      bind(el, binding, vnode) {
        let hasMouse = true;

        if (hasMouse) {
          el.addEventListener('mouseover', e => {
            vnode.context.mouseover = true
          })

          el.addEventListener('mouseout', e => {
            vnode.context.mouseover = false
          })
        }
      }
    }
  },
  data: {
    mouseover: false
  }
}

Vue Instance

new Vue({
  el: '#app',
  mixins: [mouseEvents]
})

Markup

<button v-mouse-events>
  Mouse Over Me
</button>

Here's the JSFiddle for that: https://jsfiddle.net/nq6x5qeq/

EDIT

If you like the directive approach, all you need to do is add an unbind hook to remove the listener, you can then have the binding arg be the event type and the binding value be the handler:

Vue.directive('mouse', {
  bind(el, binding) {
      if (hasMouse) {
        console.log(binding.arg + ' added')
          // bind the event listener to the element
        el.addEventListener(binding.arg, binding.value)
      }
    },
    unbind(el, binding) {
      if (hasMouse) {
        console.log(binding.arg + ' removed')
        el.removeEventListener(binding.arg, binding.value)
      }
    }
});

Now all you need to do is add each listener exactly like you would with v-bind:

<div v-mouse:mouseover="mouseOverFunction"></div>

Here's the JSFiddle to show you how that works: https://jsfiddle.net/59ym6hdb/

7
  • 1
    This has one downside: it doesn't do a full removeEventListener in the beforeDestroy lifecycle event. On a lot of un-mounts -> mounts may perform even poorer than moving the condition into the event itself, it will just keep adding event listeners without ever removing them! – Andrei Glingeanu Dec 31 '17 at 15:48
  • @AndreiGlingeanu I think we've both overcomplicated this, you would have to unbind the listeners in the directive (which would mean sharing state across directive hooks) and render functions aren't really maintainable. I would actually go for the solution provided by @RoyJ which is much simpler. – craig_h Dec 31 '17 at 16:26
  • True. But, sometimes you really have to _really_skip an event conditionally on the same node. That may happen when you have a lot of logic attached to a single DOM node (like a lot of mouse* listeners that implement a simple drag-n-drop and you just need to skip the click event, for example). Of course we can debate on that forever, I just gave a simpler and a more low-level alternative solution. – Andrei Glingeanu Dec 31 '17 at 17:18
  • @AndreiGlingeanu Yes, I thought your answer was a good answer. I think between us we've managed to provide pretty much all the options available. Happy new year! – craig_h Dec 31 '17 at 17:25
  • Happy new year! – Andrei Glingeanu Dec 31 '17 at 18:30
1

If you get the 'Invalid handler for event "click": got null' error and your handler function expects some parameters then you should wrap your handler in a function.

So this >

v-on="condition ? { blur: () => handler(params) } : {}"

Instead of

v-on="condition ? { click: handler(params) } : {}"
1

Conditional event binding works as follows:

<div @[event]="handler" />

While event resolves to null, the binding will be removed.

(directly from https://github.com/vuejs/vue/issues/7349#issuecomment-458405684 )

Example:

<template>
  ...
  <span @[mayclick]="onClick">...</span>
  ...
</template>

<script>
export default {
  ...
  computed: {
    mayclick: function() {
      return this.isClickable ? "click" : null;
    }
  },
  methods: {
    onClick: function (message) {
      ...
    }
  }
}

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.