-2

I would like to know how big a jpeg file is without the meta, header and codec information of jpeg. So that in the end you"ll only retrieve the compressed pixel data which I reckon consists of the DCT-coefficients and the quantization and huffman table.

But how to extract the size of these arrays with Python or C/C++?

I did try to use libjpeg but didn't find a way to compute the size of the compressed data.

5
  • I'm pretty sure libjpeg [I read through the docs for it just now] will not give you this information (directly, without changes to the source). Since Python's JPEG code is based on libjpeg, I doubt it will help either. You can obviously write code to read the headers and such, and then just subtract the metadata size from the overall size. Dec 31, 2017 at 15:03
  • 3
    Why do you want to know? Without the metadata the rest is useless anyway. Dec 31, 2017 at 15:06
  • I believe there are about 9 bytes of purely identification data at the start of a JPEG file. Everything else is required for decoding. Dec 31, 2017 at 15:30
  • @JohnAnderson: There are plenty of optional fields that allow the producer of the file to add extra metadata - for example the camera's exposure settings [as well as which model, lenses focal lenght, whether the flash was used, etc], user copy-right information, photo editor data, and many other things. This sort of information is definitely not part of the required information to decode the actual image-content. So whilst a minimal JPEG may well be pretty low overhead, it doesn't mean that there can't be substantial information added in some case. Dec 31, 2017 at 15:37
  • @JesperJuhl I want to compare jpeg to a compression method utilizing generative adversarial networks, which just outputs a single vector as compressed data. Because I will only work on 64x64x3 images, the overhead of the codec information has a meaningful impact on the compression rate compared to the neural network approach.
    – baudcode
    Dec 31, 2017 at 16:15

2 Answers 2

0

Here is a piece of code that does what is asked for, roughly. I don't believe there is a "ready-made" solution for this available in any library.

It is not extremely neat, and not as simple as I hoped for. I have ran several hundred of random images from my "~/Pictures" folder (and a few others in other places), but no guarantees that it will handle "any" images - I think all my images are created by two different applications. the "a few others" may not, but again, a different producer may well use different fields, or produce the data in a form that this code can't handle. If it breaks, you get to keep all the pieces, but no refunds.

I will leave it to the reader to determine what is actual image data and what is not. Note that block sizes do not include the block header itself, that is another 2 bytes on top.

Oh, and yes, this is a mixture of C++ and C. I just hacked this together with parts of code that I had laying about for a different purpose, and tidied it up so it's not a COMPLETE mess, but it's by no means my finest every coding...

I've added the code to here as well: https://github.com/Leporacanthicus/jpegrd

#include <fstream>
#include <ios>
#include <vector>
#include <cstdint>


#define die(str, ...) \
    do { printf(str, __VA_ARGS__); exit(1); } while(0)

void read_bytes(std::ifstream &f, uint8_t *buffer, std::streamsize sz)
{
    if(!f.read(reinterpret_cast<char*>(buffer), sz))
    {
        die("Expected to read %zd bytes\n", sz);
    }
}

uint32_t read_size(std::ifstream &f)
{
    uint8_t buffer[2];
    read_bytes(f, buffer, 2);
    uint32_t size = buffer[0] << 8 | buffer[1];
    return size;
}

void skip_size(std::ifstream &f, std::streamsize to_skip)
{
    f.seekg(to_skip - 2, std::ios_base::cur);
}

void check_buffer(uint8_t *buffer, const std::vector<uint8_t> &val)
{
    uint8_t *b = buffer;
    for(auto v : val)
    {
        if (*b != v)
        {
            die("Mismatch! Expected %02x, got %02x\n", v, *b);
        }
        b++;
    }
}

uint32_t find_next_header(std::ifstream &f)
{
    uint8_t b;
    bool found = false;
    uint32_t count = 0;
    do
    {
        read_bytes(f, &b, 1);
        if (b == 0xFF)
        {
            if (f.peek() == 0x00)
            {
                read_bytes(f, &b, 1);
                count+= 2;
            }
            else
            {
                f.unget();
                found = true;
            }
        }
        else
        {
            count++;
        }
    } while(!found);

    return count;
}

int main(int argc, char **argv)
{
    if (argc != 2)
    {
        printf("Expected filename as argument\n");
        exit(1);
    }

    std::ifstream f(argv[1], std::ios_base::in|std::ios_base::binary);
    if (!f)
    {
        die("Couldn't open the file %s\n", argv[1]);
    }

    uint8_t buffer[2];
    uint32_t total = 0;

    read_bytes(f, buffer, 2);
    check_buffer(buffer, {0xFF, 0xd8});
    total += 2;

    bool eoi = false;
    do
    {
        uint32_t size;
        read_bytes(f, buffer, 2);
        if (buffer[0] != 0xff)
        {
            die("Expected 0xFF byte, got %02x at offset %zu\n", 
                buffer[0], (size_t)f.tellg());
        }
        total += 2;
        switch(buffer[1])
        {
        case 0xE0:
        case 0xE1:
        case 0xE2:
        case 0xE3:
        case 0xE4:
        case 0xE5:
        case 0xE6:
        case 0xE7:
        case 0xE8:
        case 0xE9:
        case 0xEA:
        case 0xEB:
        case 0xEC:
        case 0xED:
        case 0xEE:
        case 0xEF:
            size = read_size(f);
            total += size;
            printf("APP Data Type %02x: %u bytes of application data\n",
                   buffer[1], size);
            skip_size(f, size);
            break;

        case 0xDB:
            size = read_size(f);
            total += size;
            printf("DQT: %u bytes of quantization data\n", size);
            skip_size(f, size);
            break;

        case 0xC0:
        case 0xC2:
            size = read_size(f);
            total += size;
            printf("SOF: %u bytes of frame data\n", size);
            skip_size(f, size);
            break;

        case 0xC4:
            size = read_size(f);
            total += size;
            printf("DHT: %u bytes of huffman tables\n", size);
            skip_size(f, size);
            break;

        case 0xDA:
            size = read_size(f);
            skip_size(f, size);
            size += find_next_header(f);
            total += size;
            printf("SOS: %u bytes of scan data\n", size);
            break;

        case 0xD9:
            printf("EOI: end of image\n");
            eoi = true;
            break;

        case 0xFE:
            size = read_size(f);
            skip_size(f, size);
            total += size;
            printf("COM: comment %u bytes\n", size);
            break;

        default:
            die("Expected known encoding byte, got %02x\n", buffer[1]);
            break;
        }
    } while(!eoi);
    printf("Total size = %u\n", total);
}
3
  • Unfortunately it works only on some images. Some like these fail: imgur.com/a/YvrOc.
    – baudcode
    Jan 12, 2018 at 0:59
  • By "doesn't work", what exactly do you mean? I downloaded those images, and they all pass through the program with some output - I haven't put any effort into what it should be, and what it is, but the output looks OK in general. This may of course be that the images are not actually the same as what you uploaded (a lot of sites recode their images as part of the upload process, mostly to reduce size), so you may want to first check that the problem is reproducible with the image downloaded from your link. Then describe in more detail what is going wrong. Jan 12, 2018 at 7:29
  • Sorry, it was a bug in my code :( Everything works flawlessly.
    – baudcode
    Jan 12, 2018 at 21:05
0

The amount of metadata is entirely dependent upon the encoder. There only header required in a JPEG stream is the 2-byte SOI marker. The only footer is the 2-byte EOI marker.

Anything else is whatever the encoder puts in.

3
  • In practice, that encoder is adding a reasonable amount. I started writing a program to read out what is in a JPEG file from the header-fields, but it's a bit more complex than just reading the markers and lengths. However, my 4.1K data file has some 3160 bytes of metadata in it (As far as I can tell right now) - that's from GIMP. The same input file, with a lower compression setti9ng (more detail in the picture) appear to have the same 3160 bytes of metadata. Jan 1, 2018 at 8:14
  • Which one is that? Or your own home-made one? I'm presuming Baudcode wanted to know how much it is because there isn't a known quantity of overhead from an encoder that isn't home-brewed. Jan 2, 2018 at 6:37
  • By the way, when testing my code, I ran through hundreds of images, and whilst I didn't check every individual image, it seemed like every single one had SOME APP1 or COM data stored, at the very least. In some cases tens of kilobytes (I suspect this is "preview" images, but I didn't try to analyze the content at all). Jan 2, 2018 at 6:43

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service and acknowledge you have read our privacy policy.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.