2

In Haskell,

This works perfectly fine:(mod 9) 7. It gives the expected result: remainder when 9 is divided by 7 (2).

Similarly, this works too:(mod 9) 9. It returns 0.

This led me to think that (mod 9 == 0) 9 should return True. However, that hasn't been the case: it threw up an error instead.

THE ERROR:

<interactive>:62:1: error:
    • Couldn't match expected type ‘Integer -> t’
                  with actual type ‘Bool’
    • The function ‘mod 9 == 0’ is applied to one argument,
      but its type ‘Bool’ has none
      In the expression: (mod 9 == 0) 9
      In an equation for ‘it’: it = (mod 9 == 0) 9
    • Relevant bindings include it :: t (bound at <interactive>:62:1)

Please help me understand why (mod 9 == 0) 9 wouldn't return True.

P.S.: I'm convinced that my usage of "return" in Haskell's context is flawed. However, I am just starting out, so please excuse me. (Would be nice if you could correct me if I am, indeed, wrong.)

6
  • 1
    Why would it? mod 9 :: Integral a => a -> a, while 0 :: Num a => a.
    – chepner
    Dec 31 '17 at 14:55
  • 1
    You appear to be trying to compose == and mod 9, which would look like ((== 0) . (mod 9)) 9.
    – chepner
    Dec 31 '17 at 14:58
  • Got it! I feel stupid now. On the bright side, Haskell's type system seems so useful in understanding code. Thank you. Should I delete this question? Dec 31 '17 at 14:58
  • 1
    mod 9 == 0 means (==) (mod 9) 0, comparing a function (mod 9) and a number (0). Ignoring that issue, we still have that (mod 9 == 0) 9 is (==) (mod 9) 0 9 passing three arguments to (==), which only takes two.
    – chi
    Dec 31 '17 at 15:53
  • 1
    Saying e.g. "mod 9 9 should return 0" is very common. You can also say "mod 9 9 should evaluate to 0" which is better and more common I think, since there's no implication that mod fires missiles and incidentally "returns" 0 (where "return" is from the language of mutable registers, stack, pointers, etc). In other contexts you can pronounce = as "is"
    – jberryman
    Dec 31 '17 at 18:12
7

As I mentioned in a comment, it appears that you expect mod 9 == 0 to be a function that takes an argument, passes it to mod 9, then returns the result of the comparison. You can write such an expression, but it's a little more complicated.

>>> ((== 0) . (mod 9)) 9
True

Here, (== 0) . (mod 9) is the composition of two functions, (== 0) and mod 9. The composed function takes its argument, applies mod 9 to it, then applies (== 0) to the result. (Where (== 0) is a short form for \x -> x == 0.)

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