3

I've used componentDidUpdate() in the past and it has worked as expected.

This time, however, I did

componentDidUpdate(prevProps, prevState) {
    if (prevState.object.someString !== this.state.object.someString) {
        console.log(true);
    }
}

and true is never logged. I logged both state objects to the console and found out they are exactly the same one: the current state.

Is this a bug? What am I missing here?

Thank you.

Edit: I tried to do the same thing with componentWillUpdate(nextProps, nextState) and again, they're the same object.

Edit 2: I'm changing the state by doing:

modifyObject = (field, value) => {
    const { object } = this.state;
    object[field] = value;
    this.setState({ object });
}
  • Can you show the rest of the code where the update to the state is triggered? It looks like the state isn't actually updated? – Chris Jan 2 '18 at 8:49
  • The state is modified by a change in an object like so: modifyObject = (field, value) => { const { object } = this.state; character[field] = value; this.setState({ object }); } – Daniel Valderrama Jan 2 '18 at 8:56
  • what is character and where did it come from? You are not mutating your object variable either. By the looks of it, you are just updating the state as it was previously – Chris Jan 2 '18 at 9:00
  • componentDidUpdate is not only called when state changes, but also when the parent re-renders or the props change – Shubham Khatri Jan 2 '18 at 9:01
  • Can you show a piece of code which is responsible for your changing state? Seems weird to me. – The Reason Jan 2 '18 at 9:05
8

In the added code, you are mutating a reference object by changing just a property on the object. This means that eventually nextProps and previousProps in essence refer to the same reference.

So it is no surprise that your componentDidUpdate didn't find a difference.

What you should do is create a new version of your object, and use that one to set the state, like:

this.setState({ object: { ...object, [field]: value } })

or if you don't have the spread operator, something like

this.setState( { object: Object.assign({}, object, { [field]: value }) } );
1

note that:

componentDidUpdate() will not be invoked if shouldComponentUpdate() returns false. ref: https://reactjs.org/docs/react-component.html#componentdidupdate

 shouldComponentUpdate(nextProps, nextState) {
    if (this.state.someString !== nextState.someString) {
      return true;
    }
    return false;
  }

componentDidUpdate(prevProps, prevState) {
    if (prevState.someString !== this.state.someString) {
        console.log(true);
    }
}

in some cases better use something like lodash isEqual method to deeply compare your state/props when you use shouldComponentUpdate:

shouldComponentUpdate(nextProps, nextState) {
        return !isEqual(this.state, nextState);
      }

if you have sophisticated props/state this will boost your performance as no wasteful rendering occurs

  • His problem was the fact that he was mutating a referenced object on the state, lodash would have returned false exactly the same as his code did – Icepickle Jan 2 '18 at 9:33
0

Thank you Icepickle for your comment, which solved the problem.

Instead of doing

modifyObject = (field, value) => {
    const { object } = this.state;
    object[field] = value;
    this.setState({ object });
}

I did

modifyObject = (field, value) => {
    const { object } = this.state;
    this.setState({ object: { ...object, [field]: value } });
}

Thanks again.

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