2

So here's some code from my application:

public void run() throws myException{
    boolean gameOver = false;
    while(!gameOver){
        //do stuff, and eventually make gameOver true to end execution
...

Now heres the deal, I want to remove the boolean attribute to use a user-defined exception to end the execution. I was thinking of checking if this exception had been thrown or not in the while condition, to keep looping as long as it has not been thrown.

Something along the lines of

while(myException.notThrown){

Can this be done?

  • 6
    Can you explain why this is preferable to using a boolean flag? – Scott Hunter Jan 2 '18 at 14:21
  • 2
    You can just use while(true) because when you do throw new myException(); inside the loop the current method execution will stop anyway. Wether that is good design is another question of course. – OH GOD SPIDERS Jan 2 '18 at 14:22
  • 4
    Exceptions are thrown when something "exceptional" occurs. Something unexpected that your program is not set up to handle. A game over event does not seem like an exception. – Johnny Mopp Jan 2 '18 at 14:24
  • 1
    You should read Effective Java 2nd Ed Item 57: "Use exceptions only for exceptional conditions" to learn why this isn't a good idea. – Andy Turner Jan 2 '18 at 14:25
  • 1
    It's not exceptional if it happens once every time you run your program – Aaron Jan 2 '18 at 14:30
3

The answer to your question is yes, but the implementation of such a construct depends on your needs.

The direct (and inappropriate) way would be:

public void run() {
    MyException ex = null;
    while(ex == null) {
        try {
            // Do stuff
        } catch(MyException e) {
            // Maybe handle this exception
            ex = e;
        }
    }
}

But this is a strange form of logic which could be simplified to:

public void run() {
    while(true) {
        try {
            // Do stuff
        } catch(MyException e) {
            // Maybe handle this exception
            break;
        }
    }
}

Or this, which is my preference of these three:

public void run() {
    try {
        while(true) {
            // Do stuff
        } 
    } catch(MyException e) {
       // Maybe handle this exception
    }
}

Despite all of these possibilities, since you have throws MyException already in your run signature, supposing your caller handles it properly you could just do this:

public void run() throws MyException {
    while(true) { // Or maybe some exit condition?
        try {
            // Do stuff
        }
    }
}

This lets the exception propagate to the caller. Then, have the caller handle the resulting exception:

try {
    myObject.run();
} catch(MyException e) {
    // Handle this exception
}

The structure you'd want to use depends on your flow of logic. Consider which entity should handle your custom exception. What does it mean to have this exception thrown? Who/What would be responsible for handling such a case?

  • Perfect! Exactly what I was looking for. Thank you =] – juancho Jan 2 '18 at 16:11
2

but why? in case you really need it, you can make an infinite loop to do it, you can do something like that

while (true) {
    try {
        // some code to throw an exception
    } catch(Exception e) {
        e.printStackTrace();
        break;
    }
}

UPDATE you can make an inner loop into exception

try {
    while (true) {
        // some code to throw an exception in order to remove the break keyword
    }
} catch (Exception e) {
    e.printStackTrace();
}
0

Can this be done?

Yes, you could do it like this:

public class Example {
    public static void run() throws IOException {
        if (Math.random() > 0.75) {
            throw new IOException();
        }
    }
    public static void main(final String... args) {
        boolean thrown = false;
        while (!thrown) {
            System.out.println("Roll");
            try {
                run();
            } catch (IOException ex) {
                thrown = true;
            }
        }
        System.out.println("Done");
    }
}

Which on an example roll would output:

Roll
Roll
Roll
Roll
Roll
Done

Should this be done

This is likely a bad idea to implement, as it will make the code harder to read, harder to maintain, and the overhead of throwing an exception will likely make the code slower too.

0

You could use an endless while together with an break. You would break the while if the exception occurs.

while (true) {
    try {
        ...
    } catch (YourException e) {
        break;
    }
}
  • 1
    Or use an endless loop inside the try with empty catch. No need for a break – king_nak Jan 2 '18 at 14:27
0

Yes, it is possible. But using exceptions for flow control is generally considered an anti-pattern; it makes harder to read and debug code.

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