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I'm doing an exercise in which I need to print the memory (address) of a pointer. It would be easy to do it with printf("%p", ..) but I'm not allowed to use it.

Do you know how I can get the address without using printf()? The only function I can use is 'write'.

Here is the statement of my exercise :

Write a function that takes (const void *addr, size_t size), and displays the memory as in the example. Your function must be declared as follows:

void print_memory(const void *addr, size_t size);

$ cat main.c

void  print_memory(const void *addr, size_t size);

int   main(void)
{    
      int tab[10] = {0, 23, 150, 255,
                     12, 16,  21, 42};

      print_memory(tab, sizeof(tab));
      return (0);
}

$ gcc -Wall -Wall -Werror main.c print_memory.c && ./a.out | cat -e
0000 0000 1700 0000 9600 0000 ff00 0000 ................$
0c00 0000 1000 0000 1500 0000 2a00 0000 ............*...$
0000 0000 0000 0000                     ........$
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    "I need to print the memory of a pointer" Hmmm, that's a bit unclear to me. Do you want to print the value of the pointer or the memory that it points to? – 4386427 Jan 2 '18 at 18:58
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    @machine_1: The code that implements printf does exactly that, so it's certainly possible. – Keith Thompson Jan 2 '18 at 19:12
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    @machine_1 I certainly skirted the letter of the law here by using sprintf() in the answer posted, but outputting formatted text without printf() is a simple task. Think about how we outputted formatted output before printf() existed. Or think about how you would implement printf() if you were implementing a C library while designing an operating system, for example. It's pretty trivial, just inconvenient – David Hoelzer Jan 2 '18 at 19:12
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    I'm still not sure what you're trying to do. printf("%p", ...) prints the address (pointer value). But in your comment, "0000 0000 1700 0000 9600 0000 ff00 0000" looks more like the contents of 16 byte of memory at that address; that's 128 bits, which is probably bigger than a pointer value. – Keith Thompson Jan 2 '18 at 19:14
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    @GautierLemaire: It's still not clear what you want to do. What are "addresses from an array"? Do you mean you have an array of pointers, and you want to print the value of each element of the array? Probably the clearest way to ask your question would be to show code that does what you want using printf("%p", ...) and ask how to do the same thing without using printf. (And since this appears to be a homework problem, I'd be very hesitant to provide a complete answer, though I would be willing to send code to your instructor with your name attached.) – Keith Thompson Jan 2 '18 at 19:35
3

You can try like:

#include <stdio.h>

void print_memory(const void *addr, size_t size)
{
    size_t printed = 0;
    size_t i;
    const unsigned char* pc = addr;
    for (i=0; i<size; ++i)
    {
        int  g;
        g = (*(pc+i) >> 4) & 0xf;
        g += g >= 10 ? 'a'-10 : '0';
        putchar(g);
        printed++;

        g = *(pc+i) & 0xf;
        g += g >= 10 ? 'a'-10 : '0';
        putchar(g);
        printed++;
        if (printed % 32 == 0) putchar('\n');
        else if (printed % 4 == 0) putchar(' ');
    }
}

int main(void) {
int tab[10] = {0, 23, 150, 255, 12, 16, 21, 42};

print_memory(tab, sizeof(tab)); return (0);

    return 0;
}

Output

0000 0000 1700 0000 9600 0000 ff00 0000 
0c00 0000 1000 0000 1500 0000 2a00 0000 
0000 0000 0000 0000 
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6

EDIT: I provided this answer before the OP clarified they actually wanted to dump memory contents (before clarifying it they asked for code to act like printf("%p", mem_ptr).

This code should spell out each digit (in hex):

#include <stdint.h>

/* you must provide this function somewhere */
extern void write_char(char);

char hex_digit(int v) {
    if (v >= 0 && v < 10)
        return '0' + v;
    else
        return 'a' + v - 10; // <-- Here
}

void print_address_hex(void* p0) {
    int i;
    uintptr_t p = (uintptr_t)p0;

    write_char('0'); write_char('x');
    for(i = (sizeof(p) << 3) - 4; i>=0; i -= 4) {
        write_char(hex_digit((p >> i) & 0xf));
    }
}

Here, print_address_hex is a basic algorithm for printing digits one at a time (like this one). [to simplify things I didn't care about leading zeros]

The core of the algorithm are the operators >> (acts like binary integer division) and & (acts like binary remainder). [notice that those operators will only work for bases 2, 4, 8, 16, 2^n in general].

I used uintptr_t to make it portable. This type - declared in <stdint.h> - refers to an integral type capable of holding a pointer (architecture independent). We need an integral type so that we can use arithmetic operators (besides + and -, the only valid operators for pointer arithmetic).

|improve this answer|||||
2

You don't have to print the memory, you have to transform each byte from addr in hexadecimal and print it, the second part with dots and asterisk is transform the value of each byte in char, if it isn't printable it will print dot.

#include <string.h>

#include <unistd.h>

void    ft_putchar(char c)
{
    write(1, &c, 1);
}

void    print_ascii(const char *addr, int i)
{
    int j;
    int len;

    j = 0;
    if ((i + 1) % 16 == 0)
        len = 16;
    else
        len = (i + 1) % 16;
    while (j < 16 - len)
    {
        ft_putchar(' ');
        ft_putchar(' ');
        if (j % 2)
            ft_putchar(' ');
        j++;
    }
    if ((16 - len) % 2)
        ft_putchar(' ');
    j = 0;
    while (j < len)
    {
        if (*(addr + i / 16 * 16 + j) >= 32 && *(addr + i / 16 * 16 + j) <= 126)
            ft_putchar(*(addr + i / 16 * 16 + j));
        else
            ft_putchar('.');
        j++;
    }
    ft_putchar('\n');
}

void    print_hex(unsigned char value, int index)
{
    if (index < 2)
    {
        print_hex(value / 16, index + 1);
        if (value % 16 >= 10)
            ft_putchar('a' + value % 16 % 10);
        else
            ft_putchar('0' + value % 16);
    }
}

void    print_memory(const void *addr, size_t size)
{
    char    *ptr;
    size_t  i;

    if (addr && size > 0)
    {
        ptr = (char*)addr;
        i = 0;
        while (i < size)
        {
            print_hex(*(ptr + i), 0);
            if (i % 2)
                ft_putchar(' ');
            if ((i + 1) % 16 == 0 || (i + 1) == size)
                print_ascii(addr, i);
            i++;
        }
    }
}

This code works for your exam.

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0

You could do something like this... You said printf() is off limits, but you said nothing about sprintf.

 print_bytes(char *ptr, int count)
 {
   int i;
   char string[1024];
   string[0] = 0;
   for(i = 0; i < count; i++)
   {
     sprintf(string,"%s %2x", string, *(ptr+i));
   }
   puts(string);
 }

This should loop through count bytes printing out each hexadecimal byte starting from the passed in address in ptr.

Obviously, this makes no attempt to properly size the string array. That should be dynamically sized based on the passed in count.

To substitute write() for puts(), you could use:

 write(1, string, strlen(string)); /* 1 = STDOUT */
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  • 2
    The OP explicitly said he can't use printf() – machine_1 Jan 2 '18 at 19:03
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    Thank you for your answer, it's a good way to do it. However would you be able to do it using only the 'write' function ? – galemair Jan 2 '18 at 19:08
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    @GautierLemaire: Why write? That's POSIX-specific. If you want portability, you should use something like fputc or fputs. – Keith Thompson Jan 2 '18 at 19:15
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    @DanielH: As the question already stated, and I failed to notice. Sorry about the noise. (My question still applies to the person who created the assignment, but not to the OP.) – Keith Thompson Jan 2 '18 at 19:21
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    @GautierLemaire: What address? If you're trying to do the equivalent of printf("%p", ...), please state that in your question. That's the implication of what you've written, but it's contradicted by some of your comments. The "address of a pointer" could mean the address at which a pointer object is stored, but I think you want the value of the pointer. – Keith Thompson Jan 2 '18 at 19:23

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