5

As an OpenMP & Rcpp performance test I wanted to check how fast I could calculate the Mandelbrot set in R using the most straightforward and simple Rcpp+OpenMP implementation. Currently what I did was:

#include <Rcpp.h>
#include <omp.h>
// [[Rcpp::plugins(openmp)]]

using namespace Rcpp;

// [[Rcpp::export]]
Rcpp::NumericMatrix mandelRcpp(const double x_min, const double x_max, const double y_min, const double y_max,
                         const int res_x, const int res_y, const int nb_iter) {
  Rcpp::NumericMatrix ret(res_x, res_y);
  double x_step = (x_max - x_min) / res_x;
  double y_step = (y_max - y_min) / res_y;
  int r,c;
#pragma omp parallel for default(shared) private(c) schedule(dynamic,1)
  for (r = 0; r < res_y; r++) {
    for (c = 0; c < res_x; c++) {
      double zx = 0.0, zy = 0.0, new_zx;
      double cx = x_min + c*x_step, cy = y_min + r*y_step;
      int n = 0;
      for (n=0;  (zx*zx + zy*zy < 4.0 ) && ( n < nb_iter ); n++ ) {
        new_zx = zx*zx - zy*zy + cx;
        zy = 2.0*zx*zy + cy;
        zx = new_zx;
      }
      ret(c,r) = n;
    }
  }
  return ret;
}

And then in R:

library(Rcpp)
sourceCpp("mandelRcpp.cpp")
xlims=c(-0.74877,-0.74872);
ylims=c(0.065053,0.065103);
x_res=y_res=1080L; nb_iter=10000L;
system.time(m <- mandelRcpp(xlims[[1]], xlims[[2]], ylims[[1]], ylims[[2]], x_res, y_res, nb_iter)) 
# 0.92s
rainbow=c(rgb(0.47,0.11,0.53),rgb(0.27,0.18,0.73),rgb(0.25,0.39,0.81),rgb(0.30,0.57,0.75),rgb(0.39,0.67,0.60),rgb(0.51,0.73,0.44),rgb(0.67,0.74,0.32),rgb(0.81,0.71,0.26),rgb(0.89,0.60,0.22),rgb(0.89,0.39,0.18),rgb(0.86,0.13,0.13))
    cols=c(colorRampPalette(rainbow)(100),rev(colorRampPalette(rainbow)(100)),"black") # palette
par(mar=c(0, 0, 0, 0))
system.time(image(m^(1/7), col=cols, asp=diff(ylims)/diff(xlims), axes=F, useRaster=T)) 
# 0.5s

enter image description here

I was unsure though if there is any other obvious speed improvements I could take advantage of aside from OpenMP multithreading, e.g. via simd vectorization? (using simd options in the openmp #pragma didn't seem to do anything)

PS at first my code was crashing but I later found this was solved by replacing ret[r,c] = n; with ret(r,c) = n; Using Armadillo classes as suggested in the answer below make things very slightly faster, though the timings are almost the same. Also flipped around x and y so it comes out in the right orientation when plotted with image(). Using 8 threads speed is ca. 350 times faster than the vectorized plain R Mandelbrot version here and also about 7.3 times faster than the (non-multithreaded) Python/Numba version here (similar to PyCUDA or PyOpenCL speeds), so quite happy with that... Rasterizing/display now seems the bottleneck in R....

  • Generally, I made speed gains (C with assembler iteration) by avoiding iteration within same-contour areas, and on the M-Set. Away from the M-Set boundary, large areas are contained within a contour, and I developed a curve-stitching method to follow a contour boundary, which would then be filled. The deeper the iteration, the better the gain. There can be a penalty when a bud is snipped off accidentally, and I don't see how this approach would work when using threads. Another saving can be found when following a doubling zoom, where 1/4 of the points are already known. – Weather Vane Jan 3 '18 at 19:13
  • Yes but on the other hand I was planning to moving to continuous colouring, in which the first type of optimization would not be so straightforward anymore. Reusing pixels already calculated when zooming I was planning to do... At high zooms strategies like this, en.wikipedia.org/wiki/…, can greatly benefit performance. But my main question was more centered on my Rcpp code as such, and less on the further algorithmic optimizations one could do, which are numerous of course.... And in R the main bottleneck seems just the display – Tom Wenseleers Jan 3 '18 at 20:22
  • I never filled contour areas with colour, only with iterations. Colouring algorithms are another matter. – Weather Vane Jan 3 '18 at 20:34
  • Well not really because one then no longer uses the simple escape time algo, and one no gets continuous numbers back as opposed to fixed nrs of iterations, as explained in en.wikipedia.org/wiki/… – Tom Wenseleers Jan 3 '18 at 20:36
  • See here for a Python code example: ibm.com/developerworks/community/blogs/jfp/entry/… of the two approaches... – Tom Wenseleers Jan 3 '18 at 20:39
4

Do not use OpenMP with Rcpp's *Vector or *Matrix objects as they mask SEXP functions / memory allocations that are single-threaded. OpenMP is a multi-threaded approach.

This is why the code is crashing.

One way to get around this limitation is to use a non-R data structure to store the results. One of the following will be sufficient: arma::mat or Eigen::MatrixXd or std::vector<T>... As I favor armadillo, I will change the res matrix to arma::mat from Rcpp::NumericMatrix. Thus, the following will execute your code in parallel:

#include <RcppArmadillo.h> // Note the changed include and new attribute
// [[Rcpp::depends(RcppArmadillo)]]

// Avoid including header if openmp not on system
#ifdef _OPENMP
#include <omp.h>
#endif
// [[Rcpp::plugins(openmp)]]

// Note the changed return type
// [[Rcpp::export]]
arma::mat mandelRcpp(const double x_min, const double x_max,
                     const double y_min, const double y_max,
                     const int res_x, const int res_y, const int nb_iter) {
  arma::mat ret(res_x, res_y); // note change
  double x_step = (x_max - x_min) / res_x;
  double y_step = (y_max - y_min) / res_y;
  unsigned r,c;

  #pragma omp parallel for shared(res)
  for (r = 0; r < res_y; r++) {
    for (c = 0; c < res_x; c++) {
      double zx = 0.0, zy = 0.0, new_zx;
      double cx = x_min + c*x_step, cy = y_min + r*y_step;
      unsigned n = 0;
      for (;  (zx*zx + zy*zy < 4.0 ) && ( n < nb_iter ); n++ ) {
        new_zx = zx*zx - zy*zy + cx;
        zy = 2.0*zx*zy + cy;
        zx = new_zx;
      }

      if(n == nb_iter) {
        n = 0;
      }

      ret(r, c) = n;
    }
  }

  return ret;
}

With the test code (note y and x were not defined, thus I assumed y = ylims and x = xlims) we have:

xlims = ylims = c(-2.0, 2.0)

x_res = y_res = 400L
nb_iter = 256L

system.time(m <-
              mandelRcpp(xlims[[1]], xlims[[2]],
                         ylims[[1]], ylims[[2]], 
                         x_res, y_res, nb_iter))

rainbow = c(
  rgb(0.47, 0.11, 0.53),
  rgb(0.27, 0.18, 0.73),
  rgb(0.25, 0.39, 0.81),
  rgb(0.30, 0.57, 0.75),
  rgb(0.39, 0.67, 0.60),
  rgb(0.51, 0.73, 0.44),
  rgb(0.67, 0.74, 0.32),
  rgb(0.81, 0.71, 0.26),
  rgb(0.89, 0.60, 0.22),
  rgb(0.89, 0.39, 0.18),
  rgb(0.86, 0.13, 0.13)
)

cols = c(colorRampPalette(rainbow)(100),
         rev(colorRampPalette(rainbow)(100)),
         "black") # palette
par(mar = c(0, 0, 0, 0))

image(m,
      col = cols,
      asp = diff(range(ylims)) / diff(range(xlims)),
      axes = F)

For:

enter image description here

  • Ha many thanks for that! In the meantime I found that using ret(r,c) = n; instead of ret[r,c] = n; (and adding return ret; which I had stupidly forgotten) does produce the right results - will test which is fastest though! Would you also know if I can add simd options in the #pragma ? And if I would benefit from defining more variables as private? – Tom Wenseleers Jan 3 '18 at 2:13
  • 2
    You can use the new SIMD construct on these objects. Regarding private variables, well... Those variables are private. Thus, you are explicitly creating a separate copy in the memory of each thread for each private variable. Not sure there would be a gain. – coatless Jan 3 '18 at 2:21
  • Ha yes I understand now - thanks for that! I played around with #pragma omp parallel for simd #pragma omp for simd #pragma omp simd but none of these seemed to help performance here... – Tom Wenseleers Jan 3 '18 at 10:32
  • @TomWenseleers you need to vectorize by hand. This kind of optimization is too advanced for the compiler. You have to hold the pixels that finish before others and use a mask to find when all are done and then move to the next. – Z boson Jan 4 '18 at 9:40
  • Sounds cool - I'd love to see that working if it can be done in a reasonably elegant way! – Tom Wenseleers Jan 4 '18 at 9:41
4

I went ahead and vectorized the OP's code using GCC's and Clang's vector extensions. Before I show how I did this let me show the performance with the following hardware:

Skylake (SKL) at 3.1 GHz with 4 cores
Knights Landing (KNL) at 1.5 GHz with 68 cores
ARMv8 Cortex-A57 arch64 (Nvidia Jetson TX1) 4 cores at ? GHz

nb_iter = 1000000
                        GCC             Clang
SKL_scalar              6m5,422s
SKL_SSE41               3m18,058s
SKL_AVX2                1m37,843s       1m39,943s
SKL_scalar_omp          0m52,237s
SKL_SSE41_omp           0m29,624s       0m31,356s
SKL_AVX2_omp            0m14,156s       0m16,783s

ARM_scalar              15m28.285s
ARM_vector              9m26.384s
ARM_scalar_omp          3m54.242s
ARM_vector_omp          2m21.780s

KNL_scalar              19m34.121s
KNL_SSE41               11m30.280s
KNL_AVX2                5m0.005s        6m39.568s
KNL_AVX512              2m40.934s       6m20.061s
KNL_scalar_omp          0m9.108s
KNL_SSE41_omp           0m6.666s        0m6.992s
KNL_AVX2_omp            0m2.973s        0m3.988s
KNL_AVX512_omp          0m1.761s        0m3.335s

The theoretical speed up of KNL vs. SKL is

(68 cores/4 cores)*(1.5 GHz/3.1 Ghz)*
(8 doubles per lane/4 doubles per lane) = 16.45

I went into detail about GCC's and Clang's vector extensions capabilities here. To vectorize the OP's code here are three additional vector operations that we need to define.

1. Broadcasting

For a vector v and a scalar s GCC cannot do v = s but Clang can. But I found a nice solution which works for GCC and Clang here. For example

vsi v = s - (vsi){};

2. A any() function like in OpenCL or like in R.

The best I came up with is a generic function

static bool any(vli const & x) {
  for(int i=0; i<VLI_SIZE; i++) if(x[i]) return true;
  return false;
}

Clang actually generates relatively efficient code for this using the ptest instruction (but not for AVX512) but GCC does not.

3. Compression

The calculations are done as 64-bit doubles but the result is written out as 32-bit integers. So two calculations are done using 64-bit integers and then the two calculations are compressed into one vector of 32-bit integers. I came up with a generic solution which Clang does a good job with

static vsi compress(vli const & lo, vli const & hi) {
  vsi lo2 = (vsi)lo, hi2 = (vsi)hi, z;
  for(int i=0; i<VLI_SIZE; i++) z[i+0*VLI_SIZE] = lo2[2*i];
  for(int i=0; i<VLI_SIZE; i++) z[i+1*VLI_SIZE] = hi2[2*i];
  return z;
}

The follow solution works better for GCC but is no better for Clang. But since this function is not critical I just use the generic version.

static vsi compress(vli const & low, vli const & high) {
#if defined(__clang__)
  return __builtin_shufflevector((vsi)low, (vsi)high, MASK);
#else
  return __builtin_shuffle((vsi)low, (vsi)high, (vsi){MASK});
#endif
}

These definitions don't rely on anything x86 specific and the code (defined below) compiles for ARM processors as well with GCC and Clang.


Now that these are defined here is the code

#include <string.h>
#include <inttypes.h>
#include <Rcpp.h>

using namespace Rcpp;

#ifdef _OPENMP
#include <omp.h>
#endif
// [[Rcpp::plugins(openmp)]]
// [[Rcpp::plugins(cpp14)]]

#if defined ( __AVX512F__ ) || defined ( __AVX512__ )
static const int SIMD_SIZE = 64;
#elif defined ( __AVX2__ )
static const int SIMD_SIZE = 32;
#else
static const int SIMD_SIZE = 16;
#endif

static const int VSI_SIZE = SIMD_SIZE/sizeof(int32_t);
static const int VLI_SIZE = SIMD_SIZE/sizeof(int64_t);
static const int VDF_SIZE = SIMD_SIZE/sizeof(double);

#if defined(__clang__)
typedef int32_t vsi __attribute__ ((ext_vector_type(VSI_SIZE)));
typedef int64_t vli __attribute__ ((ext_vector_type(VLI_SIZE)));
typedef double  vdf __attribute__ ((ext_vector_type(VDF_SIZE)));
#else
typedef int32_t vsi __attribute__ ((vector_size (SIMD_SIZE)));
typedef int64_t vli __attribute__ ((vector_size (SIMD_SIZE)));
typedef double  vdf __attribute__ ((vector_size (SIMD_SIZE)));
#endif

static bool any(vli const & x) {
  for(int i=0; i<VLI_SIZE; i++) if(x[i]) return true;
  return false;
}

static vsi compress(vli const & lo, vli const & hi) {
  vsi lo2 = (vsi)lo, hi2 = (vsi)hi, z;
  for(int i=0; i<VLI_SIZE; i++) z[i+0*VLI_SIZE] = lo2[2*i];
  for(int i=0; i<VLI_SIZE; i++) z[i+1*VLI_SIZE] = hi2[2*i];
  return z;
}

// [[Rcpp::export]]
IntegerVector frac(double x_min, double x_max, double y_min,  double y_max, int res_x, int res_y, int nb_iter) {
  IntegerVector out(res_x*res_y);
  vdf x_minv = x_min - (vdf){}, y_minv = y_min - (vdf){};
  vdf x_stepv = (x_max - x_min)/res_x - (vdf){}, y_stepv = (y_max - y_min)/res_y - (vdf){};
  double a[VDF_SIZE] __attribute__ ((aligned(SIMD_SIZE)));
  for(int i=0; i<VDF_SIZE; i++) a[i] = 1.0*i;
  vdf vi0 = *(vdf*)a;

  #pragma omp parallel for schedule(dynamic) collapse(2)
  for (int r = 0; r < res_y; r++) {
    for (int c = 0; c < res_x/(VSI_SIZE); c++) {
      vli nv[2] = {0 - (vli){}, 0 - (vli){}};
      for(int j=0; j<2; j++) {
        vdf c2 = 1.0*VDF_SIZE*(2*c+j) + vi0;
        vdf zx = 0.0 - (vdf){}, zy = 0.0 - (vdf){}, new_zx;
        vdf cx = x_minv + c2*x_stepv, cy = y_minv + r*y_stepv;
        vli t = -1 - (vli){};
        for (int n = 0; any(t = zx*zx + zy*zy < 4.0) && n < nb_iter; n++, nv[j] -= t) {
          new_zx = zx*zx - zy*zy + cx;
          zy = 2.0*zx*zy + cy;
          zx = new_zx;
        }
      }
      vsi sp = compress(nv[0], nv[1]);
      memcpy(&out[r*res_x + VSI_SIZE*c], (int*)&sp, SIMD_SIZE);
    }
  }
  return out;
}

The R code is almost the same as the OP's code

library(Rcpp)
sourceCpp("frac.cpp", verbose=TRUE, rebuild=TRUE)                                                                                                                                                         
xlims=c(-0.74877,-0.74872);
ylims=c(0.065053,0.065103);
x_res=y_res=1080L; nb_iter=100000L;

t = system.time(m <- frac(xlims[[1]], xlims[[2]], ylims[[1]], ylims[[2]], x_res, y_res, nb_iter))
print(t)
m2 = matrix(m, ncol = x_res)

rainbow = c(
  rgb(0.47, 0.11, 0.53),
  rgb(0.27, 0.18, 0.73),
  rgb(0.25, 0.39, 0.81),
  rgb(0.30, 0.57, 0.75),
  rgb(0.39, 0.67, 0.60),
  rgb(0.51, 0.73, 0.44),
  rgb(0.67, 0.74, 0.32),
  rgb(0.81, 0.71, 0.26),
  rgb(0.89, 0.60, 0.22),
  rgb(0.89, 0.39, 0.18),
  rgb(0.86, 0.13, 0.13)
)

cols = c(colorRampPalette(rainbow)(100),
         rev(colorRampPalette(rainbow)(100)),"black") # palette                                                                                                                  
par(mar = c(0, 0, 0, 0))
image(m2^(1/7), col=cols, asp=diff(ylims)/diff(xlims), axes=F, useRaster=T)

To compile for GCC or Clang change the file ~/.R/Makevars to

CXXFLAGS= -Wall -std=c++14 -O3 -march=native -ffp-contract=fast -fopenmp
#uncomment the following two lines for clang    
#CXX=clang-5.0
#LDFLAGS= -lomp

If you are having trouble getting OpenMP to work for Clang see this.


The code produces more or less the same image. enter image description here

  • Thanks millions for the detailed tutorial - very instructive and elegant! I also just found github.com/bisqwit/cpp_parallelization_examples/blob/master/… youtube.com/watch?v=Pc8DfEyAxzg youtube.com/watch?v=MfEkOcMILDo youtube.com/watch?v=pCoxpKTmykA&t=232s which still has some optimizations on the algorithmic side, but much less elegant code-wise I think... – Tom Wenseleers Jan 16 '18 at 15:54
  • 1
    @TomWenseleers I don't want the accepted vote. Can you give it back to the original person. – Z boson Jan 17 '18 at 12:37
  • @TomWenseleers, Those links and videos are awesome! There is clearly a lot of overlap in what we have done. I actually wrote this with intrinsics a few years ago and put it into SDL for real time rending. I also wrote it for OpenCL for the GPU. Additionally, I have implemented it for double-double computations to increase the precession because even with double you quickly run out of resolution zooming in. stackoverflow.com/questions/30573443/… – Z boson Jan 17 '18 at 12:39
  • @TomWenseleers I mostly wrote this answer because I have been wanted to test the vector extensions for a while. With the exception of the all function and maybe slightly the compress function intrinsics should not be necessary for performance at least with x86 but explicit vectorization is. I test my code on ARM for the first time yesterday. I have not looked at the ARM assembly but at least I got a nice speed up even on ARM. – Z boson Jan 17 '18 at 12:41
  • 1
    Thanks that sounds really great and interesting! For the colors this was just a simple gamma colour transform to equalize the colors a bit - the best gamma coefficient to use can vary a bit though. To avoid that I switched in the end to using histogram equalization, en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Histogram_equalization, as that always returns a pleasing colour gradient... Using smooth shading as in fractalforums.com/fractal-exteme/… or ibm.com/developerworks/community/blogs/jfp/entry/… is also nice. – Tom Wenseleers Feb 6 '18 at 14:50

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