74

I want to have a global error handling method for ajax calls, this is what I have now:

$.ajaxSetup({
  error: function (XMLHttpRequest, textStatus, errorThrown) {
    displayError();
  }
});

I need to ignore the error of aborted. errorThrown is null and textStatus is error. How do I check for aborted?

  • 3
    For me textStatus is "abort". I see this is an old question - maybe it has changed. – jackocnr Sep 5 '13 at 11:41
  • For me, it is still "error". – Jānis Elmeris Dec 19 '17 at 10:38
  • Yes sadly it varies depending on the browser. – Christophe Roussy Apr 4 '18 at 8:54
  • Also see: github.com/angular/angular.js/issues/15924 (2017) – Christophe Roussy Apr 4 '18 at 9:39
  • If you're calling abort manually (and I'm not sure when else it would get called) you can pass in the error message: abort("abort"). – MyiEye Sep 5 '18 at 9:10
49

I had to deal with the same use case today. The app I am working on has these long-running ajax calls that can be interrupted by 1) the user navigating away or 2) some kind of temporary connection/server failure. I want the error handler to run only for connection/server failure and not for the user navigating away.

I first tried Alastair Pitts' answer, but it did not work because both aborted requests and connection failure set status code and readyState to 0. Next, I tried sieppl's answer; also did not work because in both cases, no response is given, thus no header.

The only solution that worked for me is to set a listener for window.onbeforeunload, which sets a global variable to indicate that the page has been unloaded. The error handler can then check and only call the error handler only if the page has not been unloaded.

var globalVars = {unloaded:false};
$(window).bind('beforeunload', function(){
    globalVars.unloaded = true;
});
...
$.ajax({
    error: function(jqXHR,status,error){
        if (globalVars.unloaded)
            return;
    }
});
  • 3
    This does not work if an ajax request gets interrupted by JavaScript – Sano J Apr 7 '14 at 16:10
  • 1
    This is not a valid answer. In beforeunload unloading can be cancelled. If that happens, all subsequent Ajax errors will be ignored. – LOST Feb 11 '15 at 0:49
  • @LOST The beforeunload handler is user-defined. Why would you set globalVars.unloaded to true if you are going to cancel unloading in the same method? – bluecollarcoder Feb 11 '15 at 16:53
  • @bluecollarcoder All I'm saying is that if you have a big project, where you face this problem, you must go and fix all beforeunload hanlders in it, it is not enough to just add a new one you provided. – LOST Feb 11 '15 at 23:41
  • beforeunload is not called when the user navigates to another page or called too late ? – Christophe Roussy Apr 4 '18 at 9:35
36

In modern jQuery you can just check if request.statusText is equal to 'abort':

error: function (request, textStatus, errorThrown) {
    if (request.statusText =='abort') {
        return;
    }
}
  • get text "error" – evtuhovdo Jun 6 '17 at 8:09
  • 3
    in chrome, I can check for "abort". in firefox, I get "error". The solution from @bluecollarcoder seems the best for us. – foxontherock Jun 16 '17 at 18:13
  • Yes this varies depending on the browser (the usual web problems ...) – Christophe Roussy Apr 4 '18 at 8:40
21

Something I found is that when there is an aborted request, the status and/or readyState equal 0.

In my global error handler, I have a check at the top of the method:

$(document).ajaxError(function (e, jqXHR, ajaxSettings, thrownError) {
    //If either of these are true, then it's not a true error and we don't care
    if (jqXHR.status === 0 || jqXHR.readyState === 0) {
        return;
    }

    //Do Stuff Here
});

I've found this works perfectly for me. Hope this helps you, or anyone else who runs into this :)

  • 2
    I get the same status and readyState if ajax could not connect to the server to begin with. But this is the error I want to handle. Only aborted not. – Mitar Feb 1 '12 at 13:36
  • Yes this will mask other errors that you do want to see. – Christophe Roussy Apr 4 '18 at 8:56
10

You'll want to look at the textStatus argument passed into your error function. According to http://api.jquery.com/jQuery.ajax/, it can take the values "success", "notmodified", "error", "timeout", "abort", or "parsererror". "abort" is obviously what you want to check against.

Longer notes here: jquery-gotcha-error-callback-triggered-on-xhr-abort

  • I think we played around with this and it did not accomplish to detect the sort of abort error messages we had. – sieppl Mar 22 '13 at 7:53
4

Because bluecollarcoders answer doesn't work for ajax requests aborted by javascript, here is my solution:

var unloaded = false;
...
$(window).bind('beforeunload', function(){
    unloaded = true;
});


$(document).ajaxError(function(event, request, settings) {
    if (unloaded || request.statusText == "abort") {
        return;
    }
    ...
}

e.g.

handler = jQuery.get("foo")
handler.abort()

will now be ignored by ajaxError handler

3

Building upon Alastair Pitts'a answer, you can also do this to have more informative messages:

$(document).ajaxError(function (e, jqXHR, ajaxSettings, thrownError)
{
    {
        if (jqXHR.status === 0)
        {
            alert('Not connect.\n Verify Network.');
        } else if (jqXHR.status == 404)
        {
            alert('Requested page not found. [404]');
        } else if (jqXHR.status == 500)
        {
            alert('Internal Server Error [500].');
        } else if (exception === 'parsererror')
        {
            alert('Requested JSON parse failed.');
        } else if (exception === 'timeout')
        {
            alert('Time out error.');
        } else if (exception === 'abort')
        {
            alert('Ajax request aborted.');
        } else
        {
            alert('Uncaught Error.\n' + jqXHR.responseText);
        }
    }
});
2
$(document).ajaxError(function(event, jqXHR, ajaxSettings, thrownError) {

    if (!jqXHR.getAllResponseHeaders()) {
        return;
    }           
}); 
  • 1
    Doesn't help either. For both aborted requests and connection errors to the server the response headers are empty. – Clovis Six Feb 13 '13 at 14:26
  • @ClovisSix Yes, the above solution checks whether the response header is empty and surpresses irritating error messages. Works fine on multiple commercial system we run. Can you please give more details what you try to achieve/your problem is? – sieppl Feb 18 '13 at 14:42
  • We're showing messages if any of our request cannot connect to the server. We don't show them on manual abort but the biggest problem was when the user navigated away to the next page, which rendered connection errors and there was no way to differentiate between an aborted request and a connection error. I resolved the issue by setting a var on window.onbeforeunload. Which pretty much detects a manual abort. – Clovis Six Feb 21 '13 at 10:13
  • @ClovisSix: Do you mind posting your solution? – sieppl Mar 22 '13 at 7:54
  • Also here with more details: ilikestuffblog.com/2009/11/30/… – Christophe Roussy Apr 4 '18 at 9:34
0

I had the same issue here, and what I did as solution was to set an "aborting" var just before the call of abort(), as below:

aborting = true;
myAjax.abort();

and only show the error on the error handler of the ajax request, if abort isn't true.

$.ajax({
    [..]
    error: function() {
        if ( !aborting ) {
            // do some stuff..
        }
        aborting = false;
    }
});
0

The quick (and dirty) solution:

if (status === 0) { // or -1 depending on where you do this
  setTimeout(function() {
    // error handling here
  }, 2000); // 2 seconds, or use more ...
}

if the xhr error status is 0 (*) set a delay of 2 seconds around error handling code, by that time the browser has already loaded the new page context and the error will never show.

If the error was not due to an abort by navigating to another page the error will show with some delay.

*NOTE: depending on the used libs and which error handler you use it may be -1 instead of zero (Angular ...) or something else entirely.

IMPORTANT: the status text may vary from one browser to another and used libs so IMHO you cannot rely on it, please let me know in the comments if you find a cross-browser solution

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