0

I'm trying to build an efficient scenario of checking one value for various cases, each case representing a different function needed to be executed. Specifically, I have a keypad matrix with function Buttons that all should provide different functions, but the code should execute in an efficient matter, so not waste much time on checking through each statement before reaching a conclusion.

Here's an example of what I'd like to do, but it still seems inefficient due to the lambda usage / lambda creation:

def data(value):
    global combination
    functions = {
                'A' : print('Arm'),
                'B' : pass,
                'C' : lambda x: return False,
                'D' : print('Disarm'),
                '*' : lambda x: return x, #Asterisk=Enter
                '#' : lambda x: x='', #Hashtag=InputCorrection
                }(combination)
    if type(value) is int:
        ##Collect numbers, irrelevant##
        pass
    if type(value) is str:
        ##Function Buttons##
        return functions.get(value, 'Default = Ignore Input')

From my knowledge the fastest approach to this if-elif-else scenario is a dictionary, but correct me on that if I'm wrong. I'm looking for a more efficient way than lambda x:, since I've read that those lambda functions are generated on each call of the data(value) function and thus consume time.

I require a time-efficient procedure since it should not slow down the process of detecting "Buttons being pressed" on the keypad.

Also note: It's not possible to have incorrect values, so there's no fall-through. Fall-throughs would be picked up before the provided function is even called, but generally speaking they are nonexistent in this scenario.

3
  • 2
    Move the dictionary outside the function? Also note your indentation isn't compliant with PEP-8 and you should use isinstance not explicit type identity comparison. You might be better with posting actual code at Code Review.
    – jonrsharpe
    Jan 3, 2018 at 10:49
  • Do you really need lambdas here ? I suspect your lambdas are actually just calling another function, in which case you can just reference that other function directly in your dict. Jan 3, 2018 at 11:48
  • The lambdas were sort of placeholders for the example, so yea, I'm aware that I should call functions directly and not via lambda. Will read through PEP-8.
    – HackXIt
    Jan 3, 2018 at 13:03

2 Answers 2

4

From my knowledge the fastest approach to this if-elif-else scenario is a dictionary

Don't assume, benchmark. The timeit module is your friend.

I'm looking for a more efficient way than lambda x:, since I've read that those lambda functions are generated on each call of the data(value) function and thus consume time

That's true, but looking up a name in the global namespace also takes time.

Also note that the problem is not with lambdas per se, inner functions would exhibit the same problem - and while we're at it, if your lambdas are just calling another function (ie you have {"A": lambda x: funcA(x)}), you don't even need the lambdas, just use {"A": funcA, "B": funcB, } and you will save not only the lambda instanciation time but also (and that's more important) one function call with all the stack manipulations involved.

So once again, don't assume, benchmark.

Actually, before you even worry about benchmarking, check if there really is a performance issue, and then profile to find out where the bottleneck(s) is/are. We human are usually pretty bad at guessing this kind of things, and I've more than once seen developers wasting days "optimizing" the wrong parts of the code - making it unreadable and unmaintanable - without gaining any significative performance improvement, while using the profiler you could find a couple "quick wins" that took one day to implement, had no impact on readability, and dramaticallly improved the perfs (sometimes by an order of magnitude).

So back to your use case - you mainly have 3 possible implementations, a plain if/elif/, a local dict and a global dict. You can do a mock implementation of each solution and benchmark them using timeit, and then you'll know which is the fastest for your python version. If you plan on supporting different Python versions make sure you repeat the test with all versions.

3
  • Thanks for the module hint, I'll look into timeit. You're probably right about the part of the performance issue, but for me this is a learning case. So to say, I simply want to know how it should be done, since I'm a moderate beginner in python and kinda treat most problems that occur during this project like "the real deal" in order to deepen my knowledge/understanding of the programming language. Kinda my approach to it. I'll test the performance of local dict versus global dict. The plain if/elif is out of the question, I simply can't stand how that looks in my code.
    – HackXIt
    Jan 3, 2018 at 13:06
  • So I've added a global variable named combination at the top of the data() function. I've written the dictionary functions = {##Like Above##}(combination) but appearantly I can't use this lambda x: return False due to invalid syntax, but I don't quite understand what is wrong about it.
    – HackXIt
    Jan 3, 2018 at 14:32
  • "The plain if/elif is out of the question, I simply can't stand how that looks in my code" => well I can understand this, but since this is (at least partly) for educational purpose, you should still write the plain if/elif version and benchmark it too. Jan 4, 2018 at 9:25
0

I've updated the code and came up with a working solution, just for future reference. This works for now, I'll do some benchmarking later and come back to this to see if it's the best performing approach.

UPDATE, BENCHMARK: Alright, I benchmarked the code, the used code and output is below. I need to check how I can properly code this so I have multiple runs and comparison times in a format that's readable, had to manually tweak it. But as suggested by above, the performance time really is not such a big issue in this scenario.

via Functions, global variables

import timeit
import logging

global combination,functions
combination = ''

MATRIX = [ [1,2,3,'A'],
           [4,5,6,'B'],
           [7,8,9,'C'],
           ['*',0,'#','D'] ]

## KEYPAD FUNCTIONS ##
def A():
    print ('Arm')
def B():
    print ('Function B')
def C():
    global combination
    print ('Cancel')
    combination = None 
def D():
    print ('Disarm')
def asterisk():
    print ('Enter')
def hashtag():  
    print ('Input Correction')
    global combination
    combination = ''

## DICTIONARY FOR FUNCTION ACCESS ##
functions = {
                'A' : A, #Do Function A
                'B' : B, #Do Function B
                'C' : C, #Do Function C
                'D' : D, #Do Function D
                '*' : asterisk, #Asterisk=Enter
                '#' : hashtag #Hashtag=InputCorrection
                }

## DATA EVALUATION FROM BUTTONS ##
def data(value):
    global combination
    if isinstance(value, int):
        #Collect numbers#
        combination += str(value)
        return False
    if isinstance(value, str):
        #Function Buttons#
        return functions[value]()

## MAIN ##
print('Starting...')
try:
    print('Execution time [#Numbers#]:',timeit.timeit(stmt='data(checker)', setup='checker=MATRIX[0][0]', number=1, globals=globals()))
#    print('Execution time [2]:',timeit.timeit(stmt='data(checker)', setup='checker=MATRIX[0][1]', number=1, globals=globals()))
#    print('Execution time [3]:',timeit.timeit(stmt='data(checker)', setup='checker=MATRIX[0][2]', number=1, globals=globals()))
#    print('Execution time [4]:',timeit.timeit(stmt='data(checker)', setup='checker=MATRIX[1][0]', number=1, globals=globals()))
#    print('Execution time [5]:',timeit.timeit(stmt='data(checker)', setup='checker=MATRIX[1][1]', number=1, globals=globals()))
#    print('Execution time [6]:',timeit.timeit(stmt='data(checker)', setup='checker=MATRIX[1][2]', number=1, globals=globals()))
#    print('Execution time [7]:',timeit.timeit(stmt='data(checker)', setup='checker=MATRIX[2][0]', number=1, globals=globals()))
#    print('Execution time [8]:',timeit.timeit(stmt='data(checker)', setup='checker=MATRIX[2][1]', number=1, globals=globals()))
#    print('Execution time [9]:',timeit.timeit(stmt='data(checker)', setup='checker=MATRIX[2][2]', number=1, globals=globals()))
#    print('Execution time [0]:',timeit.timeit(stmt='data(checker)', setup='checker=MATRIX[3][1]', number=1, globals=globals()))
    print('Execution time [A]:',timeit.timeit(stmt='data(checker)', setup='checker=MATRIX[0][3]', number=1, globals=globals()))
    print('Execution time [B]:',timeit.timeit(stmt='data(checker)', setup='checker=MATRIX[1][3]', number=1, globals=globals()))
    print('Execution time [C]:',timeit.timeit(stmt='data(checker)', setup='checker=MATRIX[2][3]', number=1, globals=globals()))
    print('Execution time [D]:',timeit.timeit(stmt='data(checker)', setup='checker=MATRIX[3][3]', number=1, globals=globals()))
    print('Execution time [*]:',timeit.timeit(stmt='data(checker)', setup='checker=MATRIX[3][0]', number=1, globals=globals()))
    print('Execution time [#]:',timeit.timeit(stmt='data(checker)', setup='checker=MATRIX[3][2]', number=1, globals=globals()))
except:
    logging.exception('Exception:')
print('Done.')

difference with if-elif, still global variables

## DATA EVALUATION FROM BUTTONS ##
def data(value):
    global combination
    if isinstance(value, int):
        combination += str(value)
    if isinstance(value, str):
        if value == 'A':
            print ('Arm')
        elif value == 'B':
            print ('Function B')
        if value == 'C':
            print ('Cancel')
            combination = None
        elif value == 'D':
            print ('Disarm')
        if value == '*':
            print ('Enter')
        elif value == '#':
            combination = ''

with functions, local variables

## DICTIONARY FOR FUNCTION ACCESS ##
functions = {
                'A' : A, #Do Function A
                'B' : B, #Do Function B
                'C' : C, #Do Function C
                'D' : D, #Do Function D
                '*' : asterisk, #Asterisk=Enter
                '#' : hashtag #Hashtag=InputCorrection
                }

## DATA EVALUATION FROM BUTTONS ##
def data(value):
    combination = ''
    if isinstance(value, int):
        #Collect numbers#
        combination += str(value)
        return False
    if isinstance(value, str):
        #Function Buttons#
        return functions[value]()

Output, manually edited for readability

debug_timing_ver1 - with functions, global
    Starting...
    Execution time [#Numbers#]: 0.0000276039991149446
    Arm
    Execution time [A]:         0.0010460909998073475
    Function B
    Execution time [B]:         0.0007861440008127829
    Cancel
    Execution time [C]:         0.0007383310003206134
    Disarm
    Execution time [D]:         0.0005742169996665325
    Enter
    Execution time [*]:         0.0007173410012910608
    Input Correction
    Execution time [#]:         0.0006719249995512655
    Done.
debug_timing_ver2 - if-elif
    Starting...
    Execution time [#Numbers#]: 0.000028021000616718084
    Arm
    Execution time [A]:         0.0007630699983565137
    Function B
    Execution time [B]:         0.000840361999507877
    Cancel
    Execution time [C]:         0.001447234999432112
    Disarm
    Execution time [D]:         0.0002588010011095321
    Enter
    Execution time [*]:         0.0008585909999965224
    Execution time [#]:         0.000026667001293390058
    Done.
debug_timing_ver3 - with functions, local
    Starting...
    Execution time [#Numbers#]: 0.00002343800042581279
    Arm
    Execution time [A]:         0.0012339030017756158
    Function B
    Execution time [B]:         0.0009442159989703214
    Cancel
    Execution time [C]:         0.00036010300027555786
    Disarm
    Execution time [D]:         0.0002615100002003601
    Enter
    Execution time [*]:         0.0007838519995857496
    Input Correction
    Execution time [#]:         0.0002430200001981575
    Done.
5
  • You don't need to declare functions as global in data - global is only needed when you actually rebind the name. Also, unless you really want to strictly reduce your type comparisons to a single specific class, it's better to use isinstance(). Jan 4, 2018 at 9:23
  • so that would be if isinstance(value, int) is True: and if isinstance(value, str) is True: right?
    – HackXIt
    Jan 4, 2018 at 9:32
  • You don't need the is True part - isinstance() returns a bool already. As a general rule, all python objects (hence all python expressions since an expression always evals to an object) have a truth value, so there's usually no reason to explicitely test against True or False. Also, is is the identity operator and should not be used for value equality testing. For example, 1 is True is false, while 1 == True is true. This can lead to unexpected results when combined with the logical ` and` and or operators which don't yield booleans (read the doc about it for more) Jan 4, 2018 at 9:40
  • Heh, I guess that's a C habit of mine to always compare to something at least. Thanks for the info, I'll watch out for it in the future. The is identity operator was known to me, but I figured since isinstance() returns a boolean it would be fine.
    – HackXIt
    Jan 4, 2018 at 10:42
  • wrt/ timeit: it's better to have a much larger number of execution to get representative figures - on a single execution of a short simple code you'll have too much variability from call to call (due to system charge, process scheduling etc) to get any meaningful results. Also, your benchmark might be a bit too atomic... The point here is to benchmark the different possible implementations of the data function, not the the A, B etc functions. Jan 4, 2018 at 13:37

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.