I have two similar, but of different types, blocks of code in Java:

private Integer readInteger() {
    Integer value = null;
    while (value == null) {
        if (scanner.hasNextInt()) {
            value = scanner.nextInt();
        } else {
            scanner.next();
        }
    }

    return value;
}

private Double readDouble() {
    Double value = null;
    while (value == null) {
        if (scanner.hasNextDouble()) {
            value = scanner.nextDouble();
        } else {
            scanner.next();
        }
    }

    return value;
}

Is it possible to make just one method which would work for both of them?

  • 2
    Read in a string and then parse it. – MikeTheLiar Jan 3 at 13:07
  • 2
    Yes, but you would need to pass the method an argument indicating what type you're reading, and it would have more lines with if-statements. Given that there is little shared code, it will probably be harder to maintain than two separate methods. – Erwin Bolwidt Jan 3 at 13:07
  • 6
    That temp variable is useless and that if/else not needed either, just use while(!scanner.hasNextInt()) { scanner.next(); } return scanner.nextInt();. And "no", using just one method doesn't really work here, or doesn't help much. – Tom Jan 3 at 13:13
  • 4
    This is not optimization. – Koray Tugay Jan 3 at 13:22
  • 4
    @KorayTugay It's not a performance optimisation. – Michael Jan 3 at 13:46

I'd say, use a generic method, combined with the functional interfaces introduced in Java 8.

The method read now becomes a higher order function.

private <T> T read(Predicate<Scanner> hasVal, Function<Scanner, T> nextVal) {
    T value = null;
    while (value == null) {
        if (hasVal.test(scanner)) {
            value = nextVal.apply(scanner);
        } else {
            scanner.next();
        }
    }

    return value;
}

Calling code becomes:

read(Scanner::hasNextInt, Scanner::nextInt);
read(Scanner::hasNextDouble, Scanner::nextDouble);
read(Scanner::hasNextFloat, Scanner::nextFloat);
// ...

So the readInteger() method can be adapted as follows:

private Integer readInteger() {
    return read(Scanner::hasNextInt, Scanner::nextInt);
}
  • 11
    becomes a bit annoying and error prone if you have more than one read of each type. The relationship between the hasNext and the next methods then becomes duplicated. It'd wrap read(Scanner::hasNextInt, Scanner::nextInt) in it's own function int readInt(), and the same for the others – Michael Jan 3 at 13:39
  • This could indeed be an extension. One could even define a Reader interface, with an IntReader implementation that stores both methods etc... :-) – Ward Jan 3 at 13:43
  • 1
    Nice solution. The function pairs could be stored in an enum for increased reliability, e.g. to make sure noone can call with Scanner::hasNextInt and scanner:hasNextFloat. – Henrik Aasted Jan 3 at 13:48
  • 1
    Nope. Check read, it does nextVal.apply(scanner) ==> only then the actual scanner object is bound to the function. scanner::hasNextInt is not a Function<Scanner, Integer>, rather a Supplier<Integer>. – Ward Jan 3 at 15:03
  • 1
    I would prefer the version in the original post. To read a simple Integer or a Double from a file, I need to work with Predicate and Function and Generics? In my opinion this is non sense. What is wrong with readInteger()? How is read(Scanner::hasNextInt, Scanner::nextInt); better compared to readInteger()? – Koray Tugay Jan 4 at 9:50

You could have something with three methods:

  • One which says if there is a value of the right type
  • Another which gets the value of the right type.
  • Another which discards whatever token you have.

For example:

interface Frobnitz<T> {
  boolean has();
  T get();
  void discard();
}

You can pass this into your method:

private <T> T read(Frobnitz<? extends T> frob) {
    T value = null;
    while (value == null) {
        if (frob.has()) {
            value = frob.get();
        } else {
            frob.discard();
        }
    }

    return value;
}

And then just implement Frobnitz for your Double and Integer cases.

To be honest, I'm not sure this gets you very much, especially if you've only got two cases; I'd be inclined just to suck up the small amount of duplication.

A lot of people have answered that you can use generics, but you can also simply remove the readInteger method, and only use the readDouble, as integers can be converted to doubles without data loss.

  • Wait, this is very true '-' – Nathan Jan 4 at 9:05

This is about code duplication.

The general approach is to turn similar code (you have) into equal code that can be extracted to a common parameterized method.

In your case what make the two code snipped differ is the access to methods of Scanner. You have to encapsulate them somehow. I'd suggest to do this with Java8 Functional interfaces like this:

@FunctionalInterface
interface ScannerNext{
   boolean hasNext(Scanner scanner);
}

@FunctionalInterface
interface ScannerValue{
   Number getNext(Scanner scanner);
}

Then replace the actual invocation of methods in scanner with the functional interface:

private Integer readInteger() {
    ScannerNext scannerNext = (sc)->sc.hasNextInt();
    ScannerValue scannerValue = (sc)-> sc.nextInt();
    Integer value = null;
    while (value == null) {
        if (scannerNext.hasNext(scanner)) {
            value = scannerValue.getNext(scanner);
        } else {
            scanner.next();
        }
    }
    return value;
}

There is one more problem that the type of the value variable differs. So we replace it with its common supertype:

private Integer readInteger() {
    ScannerNext scannerNext = (sc)->sc.hasNextInt();
    ScannerValue scannerValue = (sc)-> sc.nextInt();
    Number value = null;
    while (value == null) {
        if (scannerNext.hasNext(scanner)) {
            value = scannerValue.getNext(scanner);
        } else {
            scanner.next();
        }
    }
    return (Integer)value;
}

Now you have to places with a big equal section. You can select one of those sections starting with Number value = null; ending with the } before return ... and invoke your IDEs automated refactoring extract method:

private Number readNumber(ScannerNext scannerNext,  ScannerValue scannerValue) {
    Number value = null;
    while (value == null) {
        if (scannerNext.hasNext(scanner)) {
            value = scannerValue.getNext(scanner);
        } else {
            scanner.next();
        }
    }
    return value;
}

private Integer readInteger() {
    return (Integer) readNumber( (sc)->sc.hasNextInt(), (sc)-> sc.nextInt());
}
private Double readDouble() {
    return (Double) readNumber( (sc)->sc.hasNextDouble(), (sc)-> sc.nextDouble());
}

Comments argue against the use of custom interfaces against predefined interfaces from the JVM.

But my point in this answer was how to turn similar code into equal code so that it can be extracted to a single method rather that giving a concrete solution for this random problem.

  • 2
    Why not use standard functional interfaces Predicate and Function? – Ward Jan 3 at 13:33
  • @Ward good point! While Function<T,R> will resolve the nasty casing Predicate.test() would make the code less readable, IMHO... – Timothy Truckle Jan 3 at 13:38
  • 2
    I don't really agree (but no-one said I should ;-)): you trade off readability of the calling code (the casting etc...) for readability of the implementing code (the hasNext/test stuff). I'd mostly favor simplicity of the calling code. – Ward Jan 3 at 13:46
  • @Ward As written agree with you as far as Function<T,R> is concerned. But in my view Predicate.test() does not enhance readability at neither place... – Timothy Truckle Jan 3 at 13:59
  • Indeed, I read your comment to fast, apparently, my bad – Ward Jan 3 at 14:13

A totally different approach from my other answer (and the other answers): don't use generics, but instead just write the methods more concisely, so you don't really notice the duplication.

TL;DR: rewrite the methods as

while (!scanner.hasNextX()) scanner.next();
return scanner.nextX();

The overall goal - write it as a single method - is only possible if you accept some amount of additional cruft.

Java method signatures do not take into account the return type, so it's not possible to have a next() method return an Integer in one context, and Double in another (short of returning a common supertype).

As such, you have to have something at the call sites to distinguish these cases:

  • You might consider passing something like Integer.class or Double.class. This does have the advantage that you can use generics to know that the returned value matches that type. But callers could pass in something else: how would you handle Long.class, or String.class? Either you need to handle everything, or you fail at runtime (not a good option). Even with a tighter bound (e.g. Class<? extends Number>), you still need to handle more than Integer and Double.

    (Not to mention that writing Integer.class and Double.class everywhere is really verbose)

  • You might consider doing something like @Ward's answer (which I do like, BTW: if you're going to do it with generics, do it like that), and pass in functional objects which are able to deal with the type of interest, as well as providing the type information to indicate the return type.

    But, again, you've got to pass these functional objects in at each call site, which is really verbose.

In taking either of these approaches, you can add helper methods which pass the appropriate parameters to the "generic" read method. But this feels like a backwards step: instead of reducing the number of methods to 1, it's increased to 3.

Additionally, you now have to distinguish these helper methods somehow at the call sites, in order to be able to call the appropriate one:

  • You could have overloads with a parameter of value type, rather than class type, e.g.

    Double read(Double d)
    Integer read(Integer d)
    

    and then call like Double d = read(0.0); Integer i = read(0);. But anybody reading this code is going to be left wondering what that magic number in the code is - is there any significance to the 0?

  • Or, easier, just call the two overloads something different:

    Double readDouble()
    Integer readInteger()
    

    This is nice and easy: whilst it's slightly more verbose than read(0.0), it's readable; and it's way more concise that read(Double.class).


So, this has got us back to the method signatures in OP's code. But this hopefully justifies why you still want to keep those two methods. Now to address the contents of the methods:

Because Scanner.nextX() doesn't return null values, the method can be rewritten as:

while (!scanner.hasNextX()) scanner.next();
return scanner.nextX();

So, it's really easy to duplicate this for the two cases:

private Integer readInteger() {
  while (!scanner.hasNextInt()) scanner.next();
  return scanner.nextInt();
}

private Double readDouble() {
  while (!scanner.hasNextDouble()) scanner.next();
  return scanner.nextDouble();
}

If you want, you could pull out a method dropUntil(Predicate<Scanner>) method to avoid duplicating the loop, but I'm not convinced it really saves you that much.

A single (near-)duplicated line is way less burdensome in your code than all those generics and functional parameters. It's just plain old code, which happens to be more concise (and, likely, more efficient) than "new" ways to write it.

The other advantage of this approach is that you don't have to use boxed types - you can make the methods return int and double, and not have to pay the boxing tax unless you actually need it.

This may not be of advantage to OP, since the original methods do return the boxed type; I don't know if this is genuinely desired, or merely an artefact of the way the loop was written. However, it is useful in general not to create those objects unless you really need them.

Not an ideal solution but it still achieves the necessary removal of duplicate code and has the added benefit of not requiring Java-8.

// This could be done better.
static final Scanner scanner = new Scanner(System.in);

enum Read{
    Int {
        @Override
        boolean hasNext() {
            return scanner.hasNextInt();
        }

        @Override
        <T> T next() {
            return (T)Integer.valueOf(scanner.nextInt());
        }

    },
    Dbl{
        @Override
        boolean hasNext() {
            return scanner.hasNextDouble();
        }

        @Override
        <T> T next() {
            return (T)Double.valueOf(scanner.nextDouble());
        }

    };

    abstract boolean hasNext();
    abstract <T> T next();

    // All share this method.
    public <T> T read() {
        T v = null;
        while (v == null) {
            if ( hasNext() ) {
                v = next();
            } else {
                scanner.next();
            }
        }
        return v;
    }
}

public void test(String[] args) {
    Integer i = Read.Int.read();
    Double d = Read.Dbl.read();
}

There are some minor issues with this such as the casting but it should be a reasonable option.

  • Static final Scanner kills this for me. Not testable. – Michael Jan 3 at 15:30
  • 1
    @Michael - It would probably be better to pass it as a parameter but as a demo of the technique I didn't want to clutter the code. – OldCurmudgeon Jan 3 at 16:12

Reflection is an alternative if you don't care about performance.

private <T> T read(String type) throws Exception {
    Method readNext = Scanner.class.getMethod("next" + type);
    Method hasNext = Scanner.class.getMethod("hasNext" + type);
    T value = null;
    while (value == null) {
        if ((Boolean) hasNext.invoke(scanner)) {
            value = (T) readNext.invoke(scanner);
        } else {
            scanner.next();
        }
    }
    return value;
}

Then you call

Integer i = read("Int");
  • 2
    It may be an alternative but it is the last resort and not what should come to mind as first choice... – Timothy Truckle Jan 3 at 13:41

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