EDIT: Although I accepted an answer that helped me get the buttons drawn correctly at runtime, I still have other issues. The root of which, I suspect, is the issue of why giving my custom button an outlet interferes with how it is drawn. I still need to know why this is. (see my answer below)

I have my own button class that extends UIButton (see below) and has several IBInspectable properties like border width/color, corner radius, and even start/end colors for a gradient background. I also use such properties for setting the image and titles' insets programmatically so I can account for various screen sizes.

Previously I had an issue where if I changed the "View as" device in the storyboard, let's say from iPhone SE to iPhone 7, and then refreshed the views and ran on a physical iPhone SE it would deploy with the insets of an iPhone 7 instead of calculating the insets with the physical device's own screen size. However, I nearly resolved this problem by overriding draw in my custom button class.

My problem now is that the overridden draw method is only called (or seems to be effective only when) the button has no outlet to the ViewController class it's placed in.

For example:

enter image description here

*The img is a placeholder; the insets suit the real imgs appropriately.

That bottom-right button has the gradient and corners drawn properly, where the other 3 do not. I have confirmed that adding an outlet to this button makes it behave like the rest, and removing an outlet from any of the other 3 causes it to be drawn correctly.

For reference, the outlets are just

@IBOutlet weak var button1: UIButton!
@IBOutlet weak var button2: UIButton!
@IBOutlet weak var button3: UIButton!

immediately under the class MyViewController: UIViewController { declaration.

Also, I didn't forget to set the Custom Class in the interface builder for each button.

Here is the button class:

import UIKit

@IBDesignable
class ActionButton: UIButton {

    override init(frame: CGRect){
        super.init(frame: frame)
        setupView()
    }
    required init(coder aDecoder: NSCoder){
        super.init(coder: aDecoder)!
        setupView()
    }

    @IBInspectable var cornerRadius: CGFloat = 0{
        didSet{
            setupView()
        }
    }
    @IBInspectable var startColor: UIColor = UIColor.white{
        didSet{
            setupView()
        }
    }
    @IBInspectable var endColor: UIColor = UIColor.black{
        didSet{
            setupView()
        }
    }
    @IBInspectable var borderWidth: CGFloat = 0{
        didSet{
            self.layer.borderWidth = borderWidth
        }
    }
    @IBInspectable var borderColor: UIColor = UIColor.clear{
        didSet{
            self.layer.borderColor = borderColor.cgColor
        }
    }

    private func setupView(){
        let colors:Array = [startColor.cgColor, endColor.cgColor]
        gradientLayer.colors = colors
        gradientLayer.cornerRadius = cornerRadius
        gradientLayer.endPoint = CGPoint(x: 0.5, y: 1.0)
        self.setNeedsDisplay()
    }

    var gradientLayer: CAGradientLayer{
        return layer as! CAGradientLayer
    }

    override func draw(_ rect: CGRect) {

        //Draw image

        setupView()

        let btnW = self.frame.size.width
        let btnH = self.frame.size.height

        //Compute and set image insets
        let topBtnInset = btnH * (-5/81)
        let bottomBtnInset = -4 * topBtnInset
        let leftBtnInset = btnW / 4 //btnW * (35/141)
        let rightBtnInset = leftBtnInset

        self.imageEdgeInsets = UIEdgeInsets(top: topBtnInset, left: leftBtnInset, bottom: bottomBtnInset, right: rightBtnInset)

        //Compute and set title insets
        let topTitleInset = btnH * (47/81)
        let bottomTitleInset = CGFloat(0)
        let leftTitleInset = CGFloat(-256) //Image width
        let rightTitleInset = CGFloat(0)

        self.titleEdgeInsets = UIEdgeInsets(top: topTitleInset, left: leftTitleInset, bottom: bottomTitleInset, right: rightTitleInset)

        //Draw text

        //Default font size
        self.titleLabel?.font = UIFont.boldSystemFont(ofSize: 15)

        if(btnH > 81){
            self.titleLabel?.font = UIFont.boldSystemFont(ofSize: 17)
        }else if(btnH > 97){
            self.titleLabel?.font = UIFont.boldSystemFont(ofSize: 20)
        }

    }

    override class var layerClass: AnyClass{
        return CAGradientLayer.self
    }

}

Please ignore the wonky way I handled insets, font sizes, etc..

Does anyone know why specifying an outlet for the button makes it not draw the layer correctly?

  • I believe this to be valuable insight but at the moment the changes in that gist cause me to hang at "Signing Product" in the build process when refreshing views in the IB. I will look at rewriting my ActionButton class soon. – Xenalin Jan 4 at 0:56
  • EDIT: I wrote this before I was aware of your 2nd comment: Well you were totally right; I ran it on my device (expecting it to hang while building), but it works! Unfortunately, I am still unable to perform the "Refresh All Views" function in the IB. Do you have any suggestions? Also, this is information is worth marking as the answer if you want to make it one! – Xenalin Jan 4 at 1:38
up vote 1 down vote accepted

A couple of thoughts:

  1. The draw(_:) method is for stroking paths, drawing images, etc. It is for rendering the view at a given moment of time. You should not be updating layers, UIKit subviews, etc.

    In your snippet, your draw(_:) is calling setupView, which then calls setNeedsDisplay (which theoretically could trigger draw(_:) to be called again). I'd suggest reserving draw(_:) for only those things that need to be manually drawn. (As it is now, you probably could completely eliminate this method as there's nothing here that is drawing anything.)

  2. For any manual configuration of subviews (their frames, etc.), that should be moved to layoutSubviews, which is called whenever the OS determines that the subviews might need to have their frame values adjusted.

  3. If you have any troubles with designable views, it's worth confirming that you have these in a separate target. It minimizes what needs to be recompiled when rendering in IB. It also prevents issues in the main target affecting the ability to render these designables in IB. (When Apple introduced designable views, they were very specific that one should put them in a separate target.)

    I've also had intermittent problems with designable views in Xcode, but these problems are often resolved by quitting Xcode, emptying the derived data folder, and restarting.

I must confess that I do not know why adding an outlet to a designable view would affect how the view is rendered. I know that when I did the above, though, I was unable to reproduce your problem.

Anyway, I tweaked your ActionButton like so, and it appears to work for me:

@import UIKit

@IBDesignable
public class ActionButton: UIButton {

    public override init(frame: CGRect = .zero) {
        super.init(frame: frame)
        setupView()
    }

    public required init(coder aDecoder: NSCoder) {
        super.init(coder: aDecoder)!
        setupView()
    }

    @IBInspectable public var cornerRadius: CGFloat = 0     { didSet { setupView() } }

    @IBInspectable public var startColor: UIColor = .white  { didSet { setupView() } }

    @IBInspectable public var endColor: UIColor = .black    { didSet { setupView() } }

    @IBInspectable public var borderWidth: CGFloat = 0      { didSet { layer.borderWidth = borderWidth } }

    @IBInspectable public var borderColor: UIColor = .clear { didSet { layer.borderColor = borderColor.cgColor } }

    private func setupView() {
        let colors = [startColor.cgColor, endColor.cgColor]
        gradientLayer.colors = colors
        gradientLayer.cornerRadius = cornerRadius
        gradientLayer.endPoint = CGPoint(x: 0.5, y: 1.0)
    }

    private var gradientLayer: CAGradientLayer {
        return layer as! CAGradientLayer
    }

    public override func layoutSubviews() {
        super.layoutSubviews()

        let btnW = frame.width
        let btnH = frame.height

        //Compute and set image insets
        let topBtnInset = btnH * (-5/81)
        let bottomBtnInset = -4 * topBtnInset
        let leftBtnInset = btnW / 4 //btnW * (35/141)
        let rightBtnInset = leftBtnInset

        imageEdgeInsets = UIEdgeInsets(top: topBtnInset, left: leftBtnInset, bottom: bottomBtnInset, right: rightBtnInset)

        //Compute and set title insets
        let topTitleInset = btnH * (47/81)
        let bottomTitleInset = CGFloat(0)
        let leftTitleInset = CGFloat(-256) //THIS MUST BE EQUAL TO -IMAGE WIDTH
        let rightTitleInset = CGFloat(0)

        titleEdgeInsets = UIEdgeInsets(top: topTitleInset, left: leftTitleInset, bottom: bottomTitleInset, right: rightTitleInset)

        //Adjust text font
        if btnH > 81 {
            titleLabel?.font = .boldSystemFont(ofSize: 17)
        } else if btnH > 97 {
            titleLabel?.font = .boldSystemFont(ofSize: 20)
        } else {
            //Default font size
            titleLabel?.font = .boldSystemFont(ofSize: 15)
        }
    }

    public override class var layerClass: AnyClass {
        return CAGradientLayer.self
    }

}
  • I figured something out. In layoutSubviews() I've isolated the cause of the build process getting stuck on "Signing product" only when refreshing views to the "Adjust text font" block. Commenting this out lets it refresh views. Also, interestingly, leaving this func as layoutSubviews() means the app crashes on device rotation, but changing back to draw() resolves this (but I'm back to square 1). Any thoughts? – Xenalin Jan 4 at 22:44
  • The code in my answer doesn't crash for me on device rotations. And without knowing the details of your crash, I cannot comment on it. I'd suggest you identify the line that is causing the problem (either with exception breakpoints or judicious logging statement). You might want to share a reproducible example of your crash (maybe post new question with minimal, complete, and verifiable example). – Rob Jan 5 at 0:00
  • I must confess that I find all of those hard-coded insets a bit worrying and I'd wager that your constraints are such that on rotation, the size changes to something that generates non-nonsensical insets. Or something like that. But I can't help you until you tell me precisely how I can reproduce your crash. – Rob Jan 5 at 0:01
  • Starting from a fresh project this solution works perfect. I'll just have to figure out what it is about my project (probably the view controller) that causes problems for buttons with outlets. Thanks for your help. I also found this which sheds some light on what's going on. – Xenalin Jan 5 at 1:58

I've accepted Rob's answer because it is far more likely to be of use to anyone else, but I've found what specifically was my issue, on the off-chance someone has a similar problem.

Apparently in my code for the View Controller on which those buttons were placed I had a function I had forgot about that enables/disables those custom buttons, as well as set their background color (to a solid color). This is why those buttons looked wrong. The 4th button was never subject to mutation by this function. It was not the fact the other 3 had an outlet, but that when I removed the outlet I commented-out the call to that function.

Nevertheless, other problems were addressed in this question!

-I had a really sloppy implementation of a UIButton that overrode and called UI functions improperly, that caused problems like freezing on rotation. These were also addressed in Rob's (the accepted) answer.

-"Refresh All Views" in the Interface Builder was hanging on "Signing product", which was caused by calling self.titleLabel?.font. According to some answers on the Apple developer forums, doing this in layoutSubViews() is bad!

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