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I have to make a (stacked) bar plot that has ~3000 positions on the x axis. However, many of these positions do not contain bars but are still labeled on the x-axis, making reading the plot difficult. Is there any way to only show x-ticks for existing (stacked) bars? The spaces between the bars based on the x-tick values are necessary. How would one tackle this in matplotlib? Is there a more fitting plot than a stacked bar chart? I'm constructing the plots from a pandas cross-table (pd.crosstab()).

link to image of plot: https://i.stack.imgur.com/qk99z.png

as an example of what my dataframe would look like (thanks gepcel):

import pandas as pd
import numpy as np
N = 3200
df = pd.DataFrame(np.random.randint(1, 5, size=(N, 3)))
df.loc[np.random.choice(df.index, size=3190, replace=False), :] = 0
df_select = df[df.sum(axis=1)>0]
  • Define "existing"? If a lot have zero values, drop them, then plot? Or is it something else? – Jarad Jan 4 '18 at 4:45
  • Basically only show x-ticks for bars with values. For example, let's say at the x-tick value of 12, there is no bar (because the value is zero or NaN) - this would mean we don't want to see the x-tick of 12, but still want the empty space left by the lack of a bar. Referencing the linked image, we would only want x-ticks underneath actual bars, not underneath empty spaces (the empty spaces are necessary, but just don't need to be labelled). Hope this makes sense. – XyledMonkey Jan 4 '18 at 5:01
  • Could you please formulate your question as a Minimal, Complete, and Verifiable example? There is definitely a solution to this, but it may depend slightly on how you generate the plot. – Thomas Kühn Jan 4 '18 at 6:21
  • My apologies - the data is sensitive so I hesitated to post it. However, gepcel's reproduction is a perfect example, so I've included it in my question. – XyledMonkey Jan 4 '18 at 16:07
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Basically, without an example, you should select out the ticks that the total value (aka, stacked value) greater than zero. And then set the xticks and xticklabels manually.

Let's say you have a dataframe like the following:

import pandas as pd
import numpy as np
N = 3200
df = pd.DataFrame(np.random.randint(1, 5, size=(N, 3)))
df.loc[np.random.choice(df.index, size=3190, replace=False), :] = 0

Then the selected data should be something like this:

df_select = df[df.sum(axis=1)>0]

And then you can plot a stacked bar plot like:

# set width=20, the bar is not too thin to show
plt.bar(df_select.index, df_select[0], width=20, label='0')
plt.bar(df_select.index, df_select[1], width=20, label='1',
        bottom=df_select[0])
plt.bar(df_select.index, df_select[2], width=20, label='2',
        bottom=df_select[0]+df_select[1])
# Only show the selected ticks, it'll be a little tricky if
# you want ticklabels to be different than ticks
# And still hard to avoid ticklabels overlapping
plt.xticks(df_select.index)
plt.legend()
plt.show()

The result should be something like this:enter image description here

UPDATE:

It's easy to put texts on top of bars by:

for n, row in df_select.iterrows():
    plt.text(n, row.sum()+0.2, n, ha='center', rotation=90, va='bottom')

It's to calculate the position of the top of each bar, and put text there, and maybe add some offset (like +0.2), and use rotation=90 to control the rotation. Full codes will be:

df_select = df[df.sum(axis=1)>0]
plt.bar(df_select.index, df_select[0], width=20, label='0')
plt.bar(df_select.index, df_select[1], width=20, label='1',
        bottom=df_select[0])
plt.bar(df_select.index, df_select[2], width=20, label='2',
        bottom=df_select[0]+df_select[1])

# Here is the part to put text:
for n, row in df_select.iterrows():
    plt.text(n, row.sum()+0.2, n, ha='center', rotation=90, va='bottom')

plt.xticks(df_select.index)
plt.legend()
plt.show()

And a result:

enter image description here

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  • This is perfect! Would you know of any way to display the x ticks on top of the bars rather than underneath? And perhaps at a vertical angle (90 degree rotation) – XyledMonkey Jan 4 '18 at 21:01
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Here's a twist on gepcel's answer that adapts to a dataframe with a varying number of columns:

# in this case I'm creating the dataframe with 3 columns
# but the code is meant to adapt to dataframes with varying column numbers
df = pd.DataFrame(np.random.randint(1, 5, size=(3200, 3)))    
df.loc[np.random.choice(df.index, size=3190, replace=False), :] = 0

df_select = df[df.sum(axis=1)>1]
fig, ax = plt.subplots()

ax.bar(df_select.index, df_select.iloc[:,0], label = df_select.columns[0])

if df_select.shape[1] > 1:
    for i in range(1, df_select.shape[1]):
        bottom = df_select.iloc[:,np.arange(0,i,1)].sum(axis=1)
        ax.bar(df_select.index, df_select.iloc[:,i], bottom=bottom, label = 
df_select.columns[i])

ax.set_xticks(df_select.index)
plt.legend(loc='best', bbox_to_anchor=(1, 0.5))
plt.xticks(rotation=90, fontsize=8)
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