12

I'm surprised there isn't a question on this already. C# 7 added value tuples. I'm trying to figure out when I should adopt these features.

Take this dictionary for example uses Anonymous Type:

var changesTypeMapByEntityState = this.ChangeTracker.Entries()
       .Where(x => (int)x.State > (int)EntityState.Unchanged)
       .GroupBy(x => new { Type = x.Entity.GetType(), x.State })
       .ToDictionary(x => x.Key, x => x.ToList());

Vs this Dictionary which uses Value Tuples

var changesTypeMapByEntityState = this.ChangeTracker.Entries()
      .Where(x => (int)x.State > (int)EntityState.Unchanged)
      .GroupBy(x => (Type: x.Entity.GetType(), x.State ))
      .ToDictionary(x => x.Key, x => x.ToList());

Which one of these would perform better, and what are the benefits of using the new syntax vs the old?

4
  • 1
    I'm trying to figure out when I should adopt these features. The only answer to that is an opinion. Is there any benefits of using the new syntax vs the old? Always - because if it didn't provide a benefit, framework developers most likely wouldn't create it. The question becomes when to use it. IMHO that's when it provides more value. In this specific case it's not providing any value, thus they are equal. Commented Jan 5, 2018 at 17:12
  • 1
    @ErikPhilips Benefits are not opinionated they are supported by fact. I.E Performance, Using Fields vs Properties. Immuatable etc
    – johnny 5
    Commented Jan 5, 2018 at 17:20
  • 2
    agreed. Please re-read my comment. I stated when someone should adopt is an opinion. Is there any benefits - Always. Commented Jan 5, 2018 at 17:24
  • 1
    @ErikPhilips I am trying to figure out when I should adopt something, That is a statement I made about myself not the question. My Question is not related to the opinion. I'll edit my my question to be more clear
    – johnny 5
    Commented Jan 5, 2018 at 17:26

4 Answers 4

10

In this situation, there's not much difference.

But in other situations value tuples can have a significant performance advantage. Because they are value types rather than reference types, a careful programmer can sometimes use them to avoid allocating new memory on the heap that must also be managed and collected. Additionally, value tuples are easier to share outside of the local scope, and so are legal in a number of situations where anonymous types are not.

That said, value types and reference types can also have different semantics, meaning you may have situations where a reference to anonymous type is much more appropriate, especially if you copy the reference around a lot.

Finally, it's not common for GC memory management to be the main performance driver of a program. The value tuple performance advantages aren't very likely to make a big enough difference to rush off and change all your old code, unless you have unlimited time to spend with a profiler tool to be sure it's a win. It's more worthwhile to be mindful of which choice produces clearer code or uses better semantics.

4
  • Thanks for the clarification, I just added a benchmark as well, the anonymous types out perform in creation, but not by much, I didn't check for the lookup times, though. I don't usually worry about micro-optimizations but I just like to know for the future.
    – johnny 5
    Commented Jan 5, 2018 at 17:39
  • @johnny5 Yes, but you also have to account for the GC's collections of the memory. In this case, I wouldn't expect much difference, because all of the memory is on the heap in both cases. But in other cases, the value type will be on the stack, and then the GC management costs are greatly reduced. That said, and to your point about mirco-optimizations... it's not common for allocation/de-allocation to be the performance driver of your program, so it's worthwhile to be mindful of which choice produces clearer code or uses better semantics. Commented Jan 5, 2018 at 17:47
  • I didn't think of that either. I guess its too hard to make an informed decision on solely performance with out more tests
    – johnny 5
    Commented Jan 5, 2018 at 17:51
  • Hmm... promoting that last sentence from comment into the answer. Commented Jan 5, 2018 at 17:52
9

There's a really obvious case where you'd use a Value Tuple instead of an anonymous objects, and that's when you need to return objects to the caller.
With the Value Tuple you have a fast way to return any number of named properties, which is not very feasible with anonymous objects.

For example:

public (int Count, string Hello) GetDataTuple()
{
    return (1, "world");
}

public object GetDataObject()
{
    return new { Count = 1, Hello = "World" };
}

Then:

var dataTuple = GetDataTuple();
Console.WriteLine(dataTuple.Count); // valid

var dataObject = GetDataObject();
Console.WriteLine(dataOjbect.Hello); // invalid

This also applies, logically, to properties/fields in classes:

class Test
{
    public (int Count, string Hello) DataTuple { get; set; } // valid
    public 'A DataObject { get; set; } // obviously invalid
}
4
  • In addition to this benefit, another one is that you can store a value tuple in a strongly-typed variable, allowing you to declare a variable and assign the tuple to it later. Quite useful for working with collections locally when anonymous collections aren't an option. Commented Jan 5, 2018 at 17:37
  • @K_foxer9 yes, I have added that to the answer, thanks Commented Jan 5, 2018 at 17:42
  • 2
    Of course, if you care that much about the names, you could also spend 5 minutes throwing a quick class together. Commented Jan 5, 2018 at 17:44
  • @JoelCoehoorn Yeah, but names are completely optional anyway Commented Jan 5, 2018 at 17:45
4

I’d say the basic advantage is that tuples have names so to speak; a method/property/field can be typed as a tuple.

You can’t have anonymous fields or properties (returning an anonymous type, although feasible, is not straightforward and has uncomfortable limitations).

Another important difference is that anonymous types are reference types while value tuples are value types. This is an important distinction even in scenarios where we are only addressing implicitly typed locals where usage is essentially the same as your example demonstrates.

0
3

I was doing some research and I found a nice benchmark. The Anonymous types out preformed the value tuples. But this is just one of many test that needs to be run to make an informed decision. I'm only providing this benchmark as convenience so no one else has to look this up. But this does not account for lookups or GC Collect

    var valueTupleQuery = from i in Enumerable.Range(0, 100000)
        select (a: i, b: i, c: i, d: i, e: i, x: i, y: i + 1, z: i + 2) into x
        where x.x > 100001
        select (x: x, _: 0) into t
        where t.x.x < 0
        select t.x;

    var anonymousQuery = from i in Enumerable.Range(0, 100000)
        select new { a = i, b = i, c = i, d = i, e = i, x = i, y = i + 1, z = i + 2 } into x
        where x.x > 100001
        select (x: x, _: 0) into t
        where t.x.x < 0
        select t.x;

    var stopwatch = new Stopwatch();

    stopwatch.Restart();
    for (var i = 0; i < 1000; i++)
    {
        valueTupleQuery.ToArray();
    }
    stopwatch.Stop();

    Console.WriteLine(stopwatch.ElapsedMilliseconds);

    stopwatch.Restart();
    for (var i = 0; i < 1000; i++)
    {
        anonymousQuery.ToArray();
    }
    stopwatch.Stop();

    Console.WriteLine(stopwatch.ElapsedMilliseconds);

Ran on lenovo y700

The ValueTuples took: 3426 MS

Anonymous Types took: 3137 MS

NOTE

In case anyone was wondering I decided to avoid the key all together and just nests my dictionaries

var changesTypeMapByEntityState = this.ChangeTracker.Entries()
      .Where(x => (int)x.State > (int)EntityState.Unchanged)
      .GroupBy(x => x.Entity.GetType())
      .ToDictionary(x => x.Key, 
                    x => x.GroupBy(g => g.State)
                        .ToDictionary(k => k.Key, v => v.ToList()));
3
  • 1
    Can you add some more information about your test. Environment, compiler flags, times and so on. So that we could compare it. Commented Jan 5, 2018 at 17:40
  • @MartinBackasch will do give me a sec
    – johnny 5
    Commented Jan 5, 2018 at 17:41
  • 1
    Mostly measuring linq iteration on the where there not value tuples prob some slight difference in inlining Commented Jan 8, 2020 at 3:23

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