42
<a href="example1.com"> innerHTML1 </a>
<a href="example2.com"> innerHTML2 </a>
<a href="example3.com"> innerHTML3 </a>

I want to style the second only (innerHTML2) using CSS selectors, based on the inner HTML. Is this possible? I've tried using a[value=innerHTML2] but it doesn't seem to work.

1
31

This is not possible using CSS. You can, however, do it using jQuery. There's a nice blog post on it you can read.

3
  • Writing a custom jQuery CSS selector provides the most control – Meredith Jun 21 '14 at 4:28
  • 2
    The ":contains(...)" syntax in that URL worked for me. But the "[innerHTML=...]" produced no effect for me. – HoldOffHunger May 24 '16 at 18:05
  • It might be a good link but does not help here :-) – Barnaby Mar 12 at 13:44
15

It's currently not possible for all browsers with css, but with javascript you can do this

Updated w/ working code. JSFiddle link below:

Initial HTML per @whamsicore:

<a href="example1.com"> innerHTML1 </a>
<a href="example2.com"> innerHTML2 </a>
<a href="example3.com"> innerHTML3 </a>

JavaScript:

var myEles = document.getElementsByTagName('a');
for(var i=0; i<myEles.length; i++){
    if(myEles[i].innerHTML == ' innerHTML2 '){
         console.log('gotcha'); 

         //use javascript to style
         myEles[i].setAttribute('class', "gotcha");
    }
}

CSS for styling:

/* make this look a bit more visible */
a{
  display: block;
}

.gotcha{
  color: red;
}

https://jsfiddle.net/kjy112/81qqxj23/

4
  • 12
    +1 for not thinking jQuery is the be all and end all of JavaScript. – Lee Goddard Feb 7 '14 at 17:07
  • Is this a misleading answer? I spent an hour before I get into that there is no getElements method. I needed to use document.getElementsByTagName instead. – FLICKER Nov 29 '17 at 20:28
  • @FLICKER answer updated with actual working code. – KJYe.Name 葉家仁 Feb 6 '18 at 17:08
  • 1
    @KJYe.Name葉家仁, Thanks. I reverted my downvote :) – FLICKER Oct 2 '20 at 16:42
11

Using CSS you can't detect the content of the anchor tag.

[value=] would refer to an attribute on the tag

<a href="" value="blah"> innerHTML2 </a>

Not very useful since the value attribute isn't valid HTML on an a tag

If possible, slap a class on that a tag. As that is most likely not possible (because you would've already done that) you can use jQuery to add a class on that tag. Try something like this:

   <script type="text/javascript">
        $(function(){ $('a:contains(innerHTML2)').addClass('anchortwo'); });
    </script>

And then use .anchortwo as your class selector.

2
  • edited because of the random downvote with no explanation – Jason Aug 12 '13 at 0:49
  • 1
    This is the closest answer as to why! TO NOTE: css selectors allow detection of attributes, these are predefined in the HTML code, where as innerHTML is a property of the DOM layer. They may resemble access in js, but are two different things, a.href is an attribute over which CSS has knowledge, a.innerHTML is a DOM property, obscure to CSS. – JasonXA May 28 '15 at 17:17
0

you can use the css nth-child property to access any element and do any changes. i Used it on a website i made to make a logo smaller or bigger based on the width of screen.

3
  • Can you provide a simple example of what the css code would look like to help others that may not be familiar with the property or format? – pczeus Jan 27 '17 at 21:02
  • for example if there is a div with class 'mark' and there are 4 <p> elements inside it, if i want to apply property to all even or odd elements, or even a single element, i can do this by n-th child property, go read about it on w3schools, as they have far better examples with all its variations, much better than what i would give here, i'm pretty bad at giving examples. ;) w3schools.com/cssref/sel_nth-child.asp – Abhansh Giri Apr 15 '17 at 4:34
  • 1
    Welcome to SO! Looks like this is one of your first answers. Your method is certainly a solution, but generally answers need two things: 1. a new answer to this specific question, which might be "you can't but here's a work around" and a sample of the code to solve the problem, because links go stale/break/move. When you get a chance, check out the tour if you haven't already. – Josiah Oct 4 '17 at 14:15
0

Using pup, a command line tool for processing HTML using CSS selectors, you can use a:contains("innerHTML1").

For example:

$ echo '<a href="example1.com"> innerHTML1 </a>' | pup 'a:contains("innerHTML1")' text{}
 innerHTML1 
-3
<style>
a[data-content]::before {
  content: attr(data-content);
}
a[data-content="innerHTML2"] {
  color: green;
}
</style>
<a href="example1.com" data-content="innerHTML1">&nbsp;</a>
<a href="example2.com" data-content="innerHTML2">&nbsp;</a>
<a href="example3.com" data-content="innerHTML3">&nbsp;</a>
2
  • 8
    You're not selecting the element by innerHTML. You're selecting by an attribute which has the value "innerHTML1". So, you haven't answered the question. – Joe Thomas Dec 23 '15 at 20:00
  • 1
    by the way @joe-tom, It helps me solve my problem. If something is not possible, ratoupoilu has given an alternate. This is the problem with most newly-enriched-in-reputation stackoverflowians. – Ramesh Pareek Nov 30 '17 at 1:08
-8

This is quite simple with a nth-child selector.

<style>
a:nth-child(2) {
  color: green;
}
</style>
<a href="example1.com"> innerHTML1 </a>
<a href="example2.com"> innerHTML2 </a>
<a href="example3.com"> innerHTML3 </a>

Edit: Here's the source I found this at. Check here for browser compatability. Source: http://reference.sitepoint.com/css/pseudoclass-nthchild

3
  • This isn't supported cross browser. IE for example won't support this – Jason Jan 27 '11 at 1:10
  • 11
    Also it isn't selecting based on inner html it is selecting based on position so it doesn't really answer the question – Adrian Jan 27 '11 at 1:14
  • As said before, this does not select the element based on the content, but it selects the element based on the index which is not wat the OP asked. – Complexity Jun 30 '14 at 6:35

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