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There has been a question at SO Why is Razor Pages the recommended approach to create a Web UI in Asp.net Core 2.0? where Steve Smith has kindly explained the benefits of using Razor Pages over full MVC from the perspective of having less files.

I've been using Razor Pages for a while and noticed that despite an advantage of a Razor Page simplicity, it is a bit complicated when it comes to custom routing, structuring folders and complex view model (page model seem to be cluttered).

So, the questions are:

  1. If there is anything else except simplicity of a page to prefer Razor Pages over Controllers/Views - specifically I'm interested in performance of the two frameworks?
  2. Is it acceptable to combine Razor Pages and Controllers/Views at the same time?

I would also appreciate if some of expirienced guys shared your thoughts (pros and cons) about using Razor Pages to better understand this framework.

  • I wouldn't mix the two. Just make the jump and try out full MVC yourself. It's not that complicated. – Jasen Jan 5 '18 at 22:30
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    @Jasen thanks for the answer and sorry for being unclear. I've been using full MVC for the last 3 years and then Microsoft made this recommendation to use Razor Pages for UI applications. So, I would like to know if somebody has already began using the framework and approve that Microsoft's recommendation should be followed. – Ivan Zaruba Jan 6 '18 at 10:11
  • @IvanZaruba can you explain what was wrong with "structuring folders and complex view model (page model seem to be cluttered)"? – S.Serpooshan May 30 '18 at 6:14
  • @S.Serp sure. I was unable to move _ViewStart, _Layout, _ViewImports to Shared folder; In case I wanted to group my pages within a folder (which is obvious) it affected page routing and the only way to override conventional routes was to configure RazorPagesOptions in Startup.ConfigureServices (unlike actions where I can decorate it with an attribute). In some cases I had big ViewModels with some VM-related logic inside; if I combined page's logic with a VM's logic and properties, the page looked ugly (seemed to violate SRP) unlike MVC models structure. All said is IMHO of course. – Ivan Zaruba May 30 '18 at 8:40
  • @S.Serp I'd rather stick to SPA + MVC (Web API) whenever possible. Still though, I think RazorPages suit better for small or CRUD-oriented projects (if no complexity evolution is supposed).. – Ivan Zaruba May 30 '18 at 10:08
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We've recently launched a pretty decent sized app using Razor Pages for the front end and MVC controllers for the API for client side components. My experience has been this:

The pages paradigm works well when your content is structured around the idea of actual "pages" on the site. Think about things such as a Contact Us or an About or even a Login page. Sure, those could be done via MVC, but MVC is really unnecessary. A simple page will suffice. Leave the controllers to more controller'ish things like a product catalog or a user database.

If your MVC architecture revolves heavily around your view structure, razor pages is probably a good fit. You can still use the MVC bits for API related stuff, but the benefit of pages is that your front end structure becomes more explicit and less implicit ("convention-based") like with MVC where each action could or could not have a view that is typically named after the action.

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  • Chris, thank you for the valuable comment. Is this right that you mean it's ok to combine Razor Pages and API Controllers, but it's not for Razor Pages and traditional Views (served from Controllers)? – Ivan Zaruba Feb 20 '18 at 8:51
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    There's no real reason you couldn't combine the two. /about could be a razor page with company background info while /users/1/profile could be an mvc view that displays a user's info. – Chris Feb 21 '18 at 0:15
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    If Asp.Net Core Razor Pages is better than ASP.NET Core MVC than why did Microsoft released ASP.NET Core MVC ? It seems folks here like MVC style, Kindly guide us when we should use ASP.NET Core MVC ? – shaijut Sep 27 '18 at 9:28
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    @Chris I'm new to ASP.NET Core, how can I make a project both MVC and Razor Pages? – Just a learner Feb 3 '19 at 2:41
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    @OgrishMan Reference the nuget packages Microsoft.AspNetCore.Mvc.RazorPages and Microsoft.AspNetCore.Mvc – Chris Feb 3 '19 at 6:24
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Although Chris has provided a clear opinion on the frameworks being shipped with a standard ASP.NET Core Implementation. People must also note that for MS to recommend Razor Pages there's rather deeper reasons for that and they have been clear to me since I'm a big fan of razor pages.

If there is anything else except simplicity of a page to prefer Razor Pages over Controllers/Views - specifically I'm interested in performance of the two frameworks?

  • To answer this, You sound like you simply haven't done a really heavy app in MVC if you're asking this question. Controllers become flocked with code, and it could be really messy, considering that not all programmers out there are following good programming practices(commenting and proper code management)... So imagine a controller with a few Page methods with logic all put in it. Well, the result is you'd easily end up with a controller consisting of over 400+ lines of code that could easily be split as it refers to different pieces(pages or methods). So How about breaking those 300+ lines of code and separating them based on what they do? This is the whole idea behind razor pages. You only put code related to a specific page to it's own model rather than mixing code related to 10 pages in one file. Well, others could argue that you can create external classes where you'd put this logic to keep the controllers clean, but why go the extra mile? and secondly performance shouldn't be an issue at all. I don't think it matters at this point.

Is it acceptable to combine Razor Pages and Controllers/Views at the same time?

  • Well, MVC is the pinnacle of WebAPI's when it comes to .NET. So the two can be mixed at any point, anytime. Razor pages truly resemble "true pages" but they're flexible to fit anything, either a catalog or whatever you wish to build. each page can serve it's own requests GET, POST etc... so due to that you can do whatever you want with a razor page. It must also be clear that routing isn't complicated with Razor Pages. It works just as flexible as in MVC...

I've been using Razor Pages for a while and noticed that despite an advantage of a Razor Page simplicity, it is a bit complicated when it comes to custom routing, structuring folders and complex view model (page model seem to be cluttered).

  • I'd rather disagree with this. Routing is flexible with Razor pages, you just haven't worked yourself around it. Also a razor page can build a very complex View because you can Bind as many View Models to it without any extra-effort required. With the annotation rule [BindProperties] or [BindProperty], you can import as many fields you want into a view... and remember that the binding is Two-Way.

Unless you start working with Razor pages, you'll hear a lot of opinions about it, some will sway you away from using it, some like Chris will give you true feedback. But my advise is, Razor pages has evolved and performs best in any application of any size...

I hope you find this interesting to read.

.Net Core Family

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  • Came from MVVM background (WPF, Xamarin), I also like RP. I actually thought RP is MVVM for Web (still not sure if my assumption is true!) – Hassan Tareq Jun 26 at 3:28
  • That's correct. It is MVVM – Mosia Thabo Jun 26 at 7:55
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Chris and Mosia give good answers. Chris writes

You sound like you simply haven't done a really heavy app in MVC

I saw no significant advantage of Razor Pages (RP) over MVC with controllers and views when I ported Get started with ASP.NET Core MVC to Get started with Razor Pages in ASP.NET Core. It wasn't until I ported Get started with EF Core in an ASP.NET MVC web app to Razor Pages with Entity Framework Core in ASP.NET Core that I saw a significant productivity advantage. MVC/EF is by no means close to a real production app, it's much simpler. Yet it has enough complexity to demonstrate the advantages of RP over MVC.

In interviews with customers, the most common reason I hear for sticking with controllers and views for UI is that they have an existing controller/view code base.

The most common reasons for preferring RP over MVC is preventing bloated controllers and better integration between pages and views.

Why choose MVC tutorials over Razor Pages provides more information and adds links to all the best MVC VS. RP content.

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