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I have an endpoint in my Web API which looks like this:

api/customers?salesRepId=123

Now, if I don't supply the salesRepId in the querystring, I want to be able to pull all customers. If the salesRepId is supplied, I want to pull only the sales rep's customers.

Only administrators are allowed to view all customers, which means that when I am logged in as salesRepId 123, and invoke api/customers without the querystring, the API should respond with a 401 (unauthorized) error.

How can I do this in ASP.NET Core 2.0 Web API?

The other alternative is to expose 2 endpoints, which I wish to avoid.

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You don't need the salesRepId except for filtering.

A call to api/customers should return all customers for admin and all customers of representative when the representative is logged in.

A call api/customers?salesRepId=123 applies the same validation (which can be checked as claim or scope via policy based authentcation), but filters the result (all customers that belong to the one representative.

When admin calls api/customers?salesRepId=123 he receives the same results as the sales rep when he calls either api/customers or api/customers?salesRepId=123, but when sales rep calls api/customers?salesRepId=456 he returns an empty result (since his results filtered by 456 results in empty).

Or in other words: If the user is some kind of administrative user, the controller will set the id of the logged in user as sales representative filter.

This way you don't have to handle it differently and the API will behave same for every user.

Don't forget, the queries in a RESTful application are there to reduce the amount of data by applying filtering.

Alternatively, have routes to two route actions. api/customers with the behavior I described above and api/salesrepresentative/123/customers or api/my/customers (to specifically imply that it's scoped down to logged in user). This clearly indicates that it's two different types of resources.

The first is a collection of all customers, whereas the second is all customers for of a given representative.

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2

I'm going to assume that the controller at api/customers looks something similar to the following (ignoring the return type for now):

[HttpGet("customers/{salesRepId}")]
public JsonResult Customers(int salesRepId)

And I'm also going to assume that you're handling authorisation separately somehow (perhaps with an attribute or some middleware).

If so, I would make the salesRepId argument into a nullable int (here is a little about Nullable types, if you've not used them before) by changing the method signature to this:

[HttpGet("customers/{salesRepId}")]
public JsonResult Customers(int? salesRepId)

Then I would do a check that salesRepId has a value (i.e. it was supplied as part of the QueryString) by doing this in the method:

[HttpGet("customers/{salesRepId}")]
public JsonResult Customers(int? salesRepId)
{
  // userIsNotAuthorised is the name I'm giving to whatever
  // whatever check you are making that the user is authorised
  if (!salesRepId.HasValue && userIsNotAuthorised)
  {
    // return 401
  }
    // user is either authorised or has supplied a salesRepId or both
}

You could also change the routing attribute to match something like the following:

[HttpGet("customers/{salesRepId:int?}")]
public JsonResult Customers(int salesRepId = -1)

Note that I've had to supply a default option in this instance. This will change how we need to change the check in the method body to match something like the following:

[HttpGet("customers/{salesRepId:int?}")]
public JsonResult Customers(int salesRepId = -1)
{
  // userIsNotAuthorised is the name I'm giving to whatever
  // whatever check you are making that the user is authorised
  if (salesRepId == -1 && userIsNotAuthorised)
  {
    // return 401
  }
    // user is either authorised or has supplied a salesRepId or both
}

Personally I prefer to use Nullable types where possible. This is because in the second example, we're relying on -1 (which we're using as a magic number, which is an anti pattern).

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