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I am building a simple app on top of the Wikipedia-API and i want to clean up the markup, that gets returned by the API. It contains all HTML-tags.

I want to create an new array, that contains all HTML-paragraphs from the giant-string.

This is kind of what i get from the API:

var string = '<p>Hi, my name is Tim!</p> <div class="xyz">This is a div</div> <p>Javascript is fun!</p> <p>Hope you can help!</p>';

And this is what i want:

var array = ['<p>Hi, my name is Tim!</p>','<p>Javascript is fun!</p>','<p>Hope you can help!</p>'];

Any ideas how this can be done?

Thanks in advance!

4 Answers 4

6

Try this:

var string = '<p>Hi, my name is Tim!</p> <div class="xyz">This is a div</div> <p>Javascript is fun!</p><p>Hope you can help!</p>';

var arr = string.match(/\<p\b[\s\S]+?\<\/p\>/g);

console.log(arr);

Ok, since @connexo suggested in comments, here's a quick explanation for the regular expression.

The idea here is to match an opening p tag to the closing one. The JavaScript match function will add each part of the string matched by the expression, to an array.

First, let's remove the escape slashes \ (used to identify all the literal chars) to see the rest of the expression more clearly: (NB: the escape slashes are necessary in live version.)

/<p\b[\s\S]+?</p>/

Regular expressions in JavaScript are enclosed in forward slashes /.../

The opening paragraph tag is matched with <p\b NB: \b means a border, to avoid matching tags like <pre

[\s\S] means any character including spaces, this will include new line chars.

[\s\S]+ adding the `+' means to include at least 1 or more of the matched characters.

[\s\S]+? adding the ? means to not be greedy, otherwise the entire string will be matched to the very end. (This is because[\s\S] matches everything and + means to include 1 or more of it.) By not being greedy, the + will only include up to the next match criteria.

</p> so, not being greedy, the + will match to the next criteria, which in this case is the closing </p> tag.

NB: the /g flag. In JavaScript it indicates to match all occurrences and not just the first match.

4
  • Very elegant solution. Nicely done! You might want to add an explanation for the regex you've built, though.
    – connexo
    Commented Jan 6, 2018 at 20:09
  • 2
    RegExp is confusing as hell for a lot of people including me. This is a good answer regardless of an explanation on my opinion.
    – user4616966
    Commented Jan 6, 2018 at 20:09
  • What will happen when the paragraph contains nested elements, such as span? Is that text wanted? Commented Jan 6, 2018 at 20:23
  • In this case, other tags like <span> will be included as [\s\S] matches everything else. If it is preferred to not have additional tags, than maybe a quick solution would be to first replace all tags except p tags. That can be done with another regular expression in the JavaScript replace function. Something like string = string.replace(/\<\/?[^p]\b[^\>]*\>/ig, '');
    – D.B.
    Commented Jan 6, 2018 at 20:38
1

You can use a temporary element and querySelectorAll to avoid all regex, and then use a map to get the markup of the paragraphs:

var string = `<p>Hi, my name is Tim!</p> <div class="xyz">This is a div</div> <p>Javascript is fun!</p> <p>Hope you can help!</p>`;

let div = document.createElement('div');
div.innerHTML = string;

let newString = Array.from(div.querySelectorAll('p'))
  .map(p => p.outerHTML);

console.log(newString);

1
  • You can pass map function to Array.from() itself. Commented Jan 8, 2018 at 10:57
1

You can do something like below using DOM API:

var string =
  '<p>Hi, my name is Tim!</p> <div class="xyz">This is a div</div> <p>Javascript is fun!</p> <p>Hope you can help!</p>';

var div = document.createElement("div");
div.innerHTML = string;

var paragraphs = Array.prototype.filter
  .call(div.childNodes, function(e) {
    return e.tagName === "P";
  })
  .map(function(p) {
    return p.outerHTML;
  });

console.log(paragraphs);
// ["<p>Hi, my name is Tim!</p>", "<p>Javascript is fun!</p>", "<p>Hope you can help!</p>"]

Fiddle link.

Another way which is close to above answer is:

let string = `<p>Hi, my name is Tim!</p> <div class="xyz">This is a div</div> <p>Javascript is fun!</p> <p>Hope you can help!</p>`;

let div = document.createElement("div");
div.innerHTML = string;

let newString = Array.from(div.querySelectorAll("p"), p => p.outerHTML);

console.log(newString);
// ["<p>Hi, my name is Tim!</p>", "<p>Javascript is fun!</p>", "<p>Hope you can help!</p>"]

Fiddle link.

0

A simple solution:

var str = '<p>Hi, my name is Tim!</p> <div class="xyz">This is a div</div> <p>Javascript is fun!</p> <p>Hope you can help!</p>';
var regex = /<p>/gi, result, indices1 = [];

while ( (result = regex.exec(str)) ) {
    indices1.push(result.index);
}
var regex = /<\/p>/gi, res1, indices2 = [];
while ( (res1 = regex.exec(str)) ) {
    indices2.push(res1.index);
}

var newarr = [];
for(var i=0;i<indices1.length;i++){
	newarr.push(str.substring(indices1[i],indices2[i]+4));
}

console.log(newarr)

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