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I am trying to develop a simple interrupt-driven OS in the C Language for x86. I have just installed an IDT, set up some ISRs (which seem to be working fine, I tested by printing 6/0) and I am now on the stage where I am setting up some IRQs. The problem that seems to be occurring here is.. well.. nothing happens. Let me go step by step on everything I have done so far so maybe we can identify the problem.

Step 1 - Set up and load the IDT
I know that each entry in the IDT is composed of some offset bits, a code segment selector, a zero entry, a type attribute, and some more offset bits. Because of this, my typedef for idtdesc_t looks like this

typedef struct {
    uint16_t low;
    uint16_t sel;
    uint8_t null;
    uint8_t tattr;
    uint16_t high;
} __attribute__((packed)) idtdesc_t;

I know that the IDT is loaded using the lidt instruction, so I need to make a pointer type that is loadable by that instruction. With that in mind, here is the typedef I use for the IDT pointer

typedef struct {
    uint16_t lim;
    uint32_t base;
} __attribute__((packed)) idtptr_t;

This is all still in my idt.h header file. Finally, to be manipulated by the code itself, I made these two variables

idtptr_t idtr;
idtdesc_t idt[256];

And the functions to set the IDT gates and to clear the IDT look like this

uint8_t idt_install()
{
    idtr.base = &idt;
    idtr.lim = (sizeof (idtdesc_t) * 256) - 1;

    for(size_t i = 0; i<256; i++) {
        idt[i].low = 0;
        idt[i].high = 0;
        idt[i].null = 0;
        idt[i].sel  = 0;
        idt[i].tattr = 0;
    }

    idt_load();

    return 0;
}

void idt_setentry(uint8_t num, uint32_t base, uint16_t sel, uint8_t tattr)
{
    idt[num].low = (base & 0xFFFF);
    idt[num].high = (base >> 16) & 0xFFFF;

    idt[num].null = 0;
    idt[num].sel = sel;
    idt[num].tattr = tattr;
}

Just for reference, my idt_load function is defined in a file called idt.asm like this

extern idtr
global idt_load

idt_load:
       lidt[idtr]
       ret

Now that this is done, we are ready to move on to step 2.

Step 2 - Write some ISR stubs and an ISR handler
Now, I need to write an ISR handler and some ISR stubs. I do it like this in a file called isr.asm

global isr0
...
global isr30
global isr31

extern handler

isr0:
    cli
    push byte 0
    push byte 0
    jmp isr_stub
...
isr30:
    cli
    push byte 0
    push byte 30
    jmp isr_stub
isr31:
    cli
    push byte 0
    push byte 31
    jmp isr_stub

isr_stub:
    pusha
    push ds
    push es
    push fs
    push gs
    mov ax, 0x10
    mov ds, ax
    mov es, ax
    mov fs, ax
    mov gs, ax
    mov eax, esp
    push eax
    mov eax, handler
    call eax
    pop eax
    pop gs
    pop fs
    pop es
    pop ds
    popa
    add esp, 8
    iret

Some of these ISRs push an error code, so I have pushed an error code for some of the ones that are not shown. I have a handler function in my C file, as one is used in the Assembly function. It takes a pointer to a regs_t typed variable called r, which represents the stack frame. The definition for regs_t looks like this

typedef struct {
    uint32_t gs, fs, es, ds;
    uint32_t edi, esi, ebp, esp, ebx, edx, ecx, eax;
    uint32_t int_no, err_code;
    uint32_t eip, cs, eflags, useresp, ss;
} regs_t;

So with all that said, here is my handler function

void handler(regs_t *r)
{
    if(r->int_no < 32) {
        terminal_puterr(emsgs[r->int_no], r->int_no);
        for(;;);
    }
}

And of course, I need to remap the ISRs (most of it taken out for compactness) as well.

uint8_t isr_install()
{
    idt_setentry(0, (unsigned) isr0, 0x08, 0x8E);
    idt_setentry(1, (unsigned) isr1, 0x08, 0x8E);
    ...
    idt_setentry(30, (unsigned) isr30, 0x08, 0x8E);
    idt_setentry(31, (unsigned) isr31, 0x08, 0x8E);
    return 0;
}

Once I switched to GNU make, the handler catches(d) the right exceptions when they are called in kmain(). Now, the problematic parts begin... once I load my IRQs in a very similar way, the CPU just triple faults. The only handler I have is the timer handler. Here is my code, starting with irq.asm

global irq0
...
global irq15

extern handler_irq

irq0:
    cli
    push byte 0
    push byte 32
    jmp irq_stub
...
irq15:
    cli
    push byte 0
    push byte 47
    jmp irq_stub
irq_stub:
    pusha
    push ds
    push es
    push fs
    push gs
    mov ax, 0x10
    mov ds, ax
    mov es, ax
    mov fs, ax
    mov gs, ax
    mov eax, esp
    mov eax, handler_irq
    call eax
    pop eax
    pop gs
    pop fs
    pop es
    pop ds
    popa
    add esp, 8
    iret

And my irq.c, which contains my handlers and the remapping code

#include <irq.h>

void *irq_routines[16] = {
    0, 0, 0, 0,
    0, 0, 0, 0,
    0, 0, 0, 0,
    0, 0, 0, 0,
};

void irq_install_handler(int irq, void (*handler)(regs_t *r))
{
    irq_routines[irq] = handler;
}

void irq_remove_handler(int irq)
{
    irq_routines[irq] = 0;
}

void irq_remap(void)
{
    outb(0x20, 0x11);
    outb(0xA0, 0x11);
    outb(0x21, 0x20);
    outb(0xA1, 0x28);
    outb(0x21, 0x04);
    outb(0xA1, 0x02);
    outb(0x21, 0x01);
    outb(0xA1, 0x01);
    outb(0x21, 0x0);
    outb(0xA1, 0x0);
}

void handler_irq(regs_t *r)
{
    void (*handler) (regs_t *r);
    handler = irq_routines[r->int_no - 32];

    if(handler) {
        handler(r);
    }

    if(r->int_no >= 40) {
        outb(0xA0, 0x20);
    }

    outb(0x20, 0x20);
}

void irq_install()
{
    irq_remap();
    idt_setentry(32, (unsigned)irq0, 0x08, 0x8E);
    ...
    idt_setentry(47, (unsigned)irq15, 0x08, 0x8E);
}

And finally, I mapped a timer handler to IRQ 0 (for now, the code is from James Molloy's Kernel Development Tutorials)

#include <timer.h>

uint32_t tick = 0;

static void timer_callback(regs_t *r)
{
   tick++;
   terminal_puts("Tick: ");
   terminal_putint(tick);
   terminal_puts("\n");
}

void timer_install(uint32_t frequency)
{
   // Firstly, register our timer callback.
   irq_install_handler(0, &timer_callback);

   // The value we send to the PIT is the value to divide it's input clock
   // (1193180 Hz) by, to get our required frequency. Important to note is
   // that the divisor must be small enough to fit into 16-bits.
   uint32_t divisor = 1193180 / frequency;

   // Send the command byte.
   outb(0x43, 0x36);

   // Divisor has to be sent byte-wise, so split here into upper/lower bytes.
   uint8_t l = (uint8_t)(divisor & 0xFF);
   uint8_t h = (uint8_t)( (divisor>>8) & 0xFF );

   // Send the frequency divisor.
   outb(0x40, l);
   outb(0x40, h);
}

But, when I try to install this handler in kmain.c, it results in a Triple Fault and not even my ISR handlers working anymore. Here is the code in kmain.c

#include <kernel.h>

void kmain(void)
{
    interrupt_disable();
    terminal_init(LGREEN, BLACK);

    idt_install();
    irq_install();
    interrupt_enable();

    terminal_puts("Hello, refined world!\n");
    terminal_puts("This is a kernel\n");
    terminal_puts("Working or not?\n");

    timer_install(50);

    while(1) {asm volatile ("cli"); asm volatile ("hlt");};
}

I have been struggling with this for days. What is the problem, and how do I fix it?
P.S: some people suggesting getting rid of the "cli" at the end, but it just did the same and also resulted in a Triple Fault.

  • 1
    Are you using a mutiboot loader? If so, have you set up your own GDT? – Michael Petch Jan 7 '18 at 5:01
  • 1
    Long story short replace mov eax, esp with push esp. – Michael Petch Jan 7 '18 at 5:25
  • 2
    If you are not doing so I suggest running this in bochdbg or some other system emulator that lets you step through and examine state, look at what it thinks the interrupts point at. – SoronelHaetir Jan 7 '18 at 5:38
  • 1
    you should set a breakpoint on the interrupt handler and step through it. – Michael Petch Jan 7 '18 at 6:54
  • 2
    @MichaelPetch I have fixed all the problems! I now have a simple interrupt based keyboard I/O driver! – Safal Aryal Jan 7 '18 at 8:14

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