1

I create a thread to whom a void* to a structure is passed as argument. This structure is created in a class. When this class destructor is called, that is at the end of main, the structure is deleted. So later i see the child thread is launched again, and referring to its void* argument throws an exception as its already deallocated. I was hoping that the child threads gets exited before the destructors are called but that's not happening.

From Exitthread page in MSDN,

However, in C++ code, the thread is exited before any destructors can be called or any other automatic cleanup can be performed.

whats the destructors the above line is referring to?

The child thread executes on a procedure that has a lifetime of the main thread. Using a global flag, i thought i could control the child thread execution. I set the global flag on the last routine that main thread executes. But does global objects get deallocated before the termination of child thread. In that case, even that wont help me.

To summarise, whats the best way i could exit a child thread which has the lifetime of the main thread? I do not want to use terminatethread api.

Edit: Some code sample

//In a method at end of main

void EndofMain()
{
 WaitForSingleObject(globalObj->hMutex, INFINITE)
 globalObj->threadActive = false;
 ReleaseMutex(globalObj->hMutex);
}

void ChildThreadProc(void* data)
{
 while(globalObj->threadActive)
 {
    WaitForSingleObject(globalObj->hMutex, INFINITE)
   //do other stuff
   ReleaseMutex(globalObj->hMutex);
   sleep(1000);
 }
}

Now is there a chance where globalObj is deallocated and then the child thread is called?

  • 3
    c++ does not yet have any kind of multi threading support. Which means you are using a library: boost, pthreads, win32 threads, or some kind of vendor extension: msvc's _beginthreadex api for eg. Please say which. – Chris Becke Jan 27 '11 at 6:50
  • msvc's _beginthreadex api.. – excray Jan 27 '11 at 7:00
1

One option would be to have the main thread signal the child thread that it should exit (perhaps by setting a Boolean flag), then using WaitForSingleObject at the end of main() to wait for the thread to terminate before returning and calling the destructors. This prevents the error you've described by forcing the thread to exit (in a safe manner) before destructors fire.

  • I do set a boolean flag at the end of main. But how does WaitForSingleObject guarantee a thread termination? – excray Jan 27 '11 at 7:03
  • WaitForSingleObject(threadHandle, INFINITE) doesn't return until the thread terminates (unless unexpected error). This link provides an example and helpful description: codeproject.com/KB/cpp/rendevouz.aspx – user568493 Jan 27 '11 at 7:24
  • @Vivek, what Templatetypedef meant to mention was that the handle you pass to WaitForSingleObject should be the thread handle. That's how WaitForSingleObject guarantees the thread has terminated — it won't return until the thread terminates. The thread needs to periodically check the flag, and if it's set, the thread needs to exit as soon as possible. Normally, that's done simply by returning from the threadproc, not by calling ExitThread. – Rob Kennedy Jan 27 '11 at 7:24
  • okay got it. Thanks – excray Jan 27 '11 at 8:20

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.