0

In my java textbook, it reads "2147483647 + 1 is actually -2147483648"

I understand it's because of overflow, but why did they choose to have it equal the smallest integer value?

  • Because it wraps around to start over at the beginning (the lowest value) because it changes the sign bit (goes from highest positive to lowest negative). – Ken White Jan 9 '18 at 2:17
  • 3
    2147483647 is 111...11(2), it adds 1 is 100...00 which is -2147483648 in two's compliment representation. – zhh Jan 9 '18 at 2:18
  • 1
    To which value do you think it should overflow? What makes you think so? – Pshemo Jan 9 '18 at 2:25
6

Nobody "chose" for overflow to work that way, it is the natural result of addition in two's-complement representation. A 32-bit number can represent 4,294,967,296 distinct values. An unsigned number (which Java does not have) would have a range [0..4,294,967,295].

Two's complement splits that entire range so that half of it represents numbers >= 0 and the other half represents numbers < 0, and it does this in a way that is easy to implement in hardware.

Let's count downwards in binary

    Decimal          Binary
-----------      -----------------------------------     
          2      00000000 00000000 00000000 00000010
          1      00000000 00000000 00000000 00000001
          0      00000000 00000000 00000000 00000000
         -1      11111111 11111111 11111111 11111111
         -2      11111111 11111111 11111111 11111110

It might help if you think of the binary number as an odometer on your car. The difference is that this counter can go in either direction. So when counting downwards, when it gets to zero it wraps around to the largest unsigned positive number. What two's complement does is call that bit pattern (all 1s) -1 so that no special hardware is needed to accommodate it and the counting behavior is continuous at zero. This has two consequences

  1. The leftmost bit tells us if the number is positive (0) or negative (1)
  2. Since there's no discontinuity at zero, you can add negative and positive numbers and get the right result without any special considerations. Do the arithmetic to add the binary +1 and -1 and you get zero.

Now let's look at the other end of things. Keep subtracting until you get to:

    Decimal          Binary
-----------      -----------------------------------     
-2147483647      10000000 00000000 00000000 00000001
-2147483648      10000000 00000000 00000000 00000000

    now, if you subtract 1 more...
          ?      01111111 11111111 11111111 11111111

But the resulting bit pattern is just the largest positive number that can be represented, or 2147483647. Add 1 back to this value and you wrap around to the smallest negative number.

-2147483648      10000000 00000000 00000000 00000000

There are two alternatives to two's-complement. One's-complement and "sign-magnitude", both of which require much more complex hardware to do arithmetic because they exhibit discontinuities at zero. Both have +0 and -0 with different representations, requiring adjustments when doing arithmetic.

If you did the same thing as 2's-complement with decimal it would be called "tens-complement" and would work like this (for simplicity I'll use a 3-digit counter)

Actual     10's complement
 Value     representation
------     ---------------
 499          499
   2          002
   1          001
   0          000
  -1          999
  -2          998
-499          501
-500          500

In the same way as with 2's-complement, we've taken an unsigned range of 0-999 (1000 values) and split it so that half (0-499) represents zero and the positive values and the other half (500-999) represents negative numbers.

  • 1
    Explained really well – poiasd Feb 17 '19 at 13:21
  • Your answer is so impressive, exactly the way it should have been explained in our Electronics class. – shreeneewas May 7 '19 at 14:53

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.