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Working with NOAA Severe Weather data, which includes a variable EVTYPE (event type) describing the type of weather event. The values include many synonyms which I would like to gather under several broader designations. For example there is TORNADO but also ROTATING WALL CLOUD, FUNNEL CLOUD, and WHIRLWIND that in a sense describe relatively similar events. Without getting into the subtleties of meteorology, I'd like to combine nearly synonymous values like these under a single value name.

So let's say I have the dataset loaded in a dataframe noaa_clean and I apply this:

tornado <- sapply(as.character(noaa_clean$EVTYPE), 
                   function(x){grepl("^.*TORNAD.*$", x) |
                               grepl("^.*SPOUT.*$", x) |
                               grepl("^.*WHIRL.*$", x) |
                               grepl("^.*FUNNEL.*$", x) |
                               grepl("^.*ROTATING WALL CLOUD.*$", x) |
                               grepl("^.*DUST DEVIL.*$", x)})
noaa_clean[tornado, "EVCAT"] <- "TORNADO"; rm(tornado)

It works well, but I have several of these and it takes some time (~5-10min) to run them all. My question is just this: Is there a better way to harness grepl() or regex that could make it more efficient?

  • 1
    The | operator works even in regex. You could call grepl just once with grepl("^.*TORNAD|SPOUT|WHIRL|(...).*$", x) (where the ... indicate the other possibilities). – nicola Jan 10 '18 at 16:51
  • You might also get a speed-up if you switch to stringi::stri_detect_regex instead of grepl. (And combine the patterns and lose the sapply as in MrFlick's answer.) – Gregor Jan 10 '18 at 16:52
  • You may also want to use word boundaries \bTORNAD\b – ctwheels Jan 10 '18 at 16:53
3

Since you specifically asked about speed, a test of the various solutions posted in the comments or as answers is:

#Initialize vector
x <- sample(c("TORNA", "SPOUT", "WHIRL", "FUNNEL", "ROTATING WALL CLOUD", "DUST DEVIL",
                LETTERS[1:8]), 1e6, replace = TRUE)

#Using separate grepl's
multi_grepl <- function(x) {grepl("TORNAD", x) |grepl("SPOUT", x) |grepl("WHIRL", x) |grepl("FUNNEL", x) | grepl("ROTATING WALL CLOUD", x) |grepl("DUST DEVIL", x)}

#One grepl
one_grepl <- function(x) grepl("TORNAD|SPOUT|WHIRL|FUNNEL|ROTATING WALL CLOUD|DUST DEVIL", x)

#Using stri_detect_regex
detect_regex <- function(x) stringi::stri_detect_regex(x, "TORNAD|SPOUT|WHIRL|FUNNEL|ROTATING WALL CLOUD|DUST DEVIL")

#Original solution with sapply
orig_sapply <- function(x) sapply(x, function(y){grepl("^.*TORNAD.*$", y) |grepl("^.*SPOUT.*$", y) |grepl("^.*WHIRL.*$", y) |grepl("^.*FUNNEL.*$", y) |grepl("^.*ROTATING WALL CLOUD.*$", y) |grepl("^.*DUST DEVIL.*$", y)})

#Using stri_detect_fixed
stri_fixed = function(x) { stri_detect_fixed(x, pattern = "TORNAD") | stri_detect_fixed(x, pattern = "SPOUT") | stri_detect_fixed(x, pattern = "WHIRL") | stri_detect_fixed(x, pattern = "FUNNEL") | stri_detect_fixed(x, pattern = "ROTATING WALL CLOUD") | stri_detect_fixed(x, pattern = "DUST DEVIL") }


#Checking that all these give same answer
identical(multi_grepl(x), one_grepl(x), detect_regex(x), orig_sapply(x), stri_fixed(x))
#[1] TRUE

microbenchmark::microbenchmark(multi_grepl(x),
                               one_grepl(x),
                               detect_regex(x),
                               orig_sapply(x),
                               stri_fixed(x), times = 20L)

#Unit: milliseconds
#            expr        min         lq       mean     median         uq        max neval
#  multi_grepl(x)   724.6716   738.5227   754.2347   747.1441   769.2897   819.9971    20
#    one_grepl(x)   406.7987   410.3197   420.0083   412.1168   426.5932   453.2471    20
# detect_regex(x)   167.4844   170.0834   174.1256   172.7410   177.1546   187.3211    20
#  orig_sapply(x) 47172.3407 47379.8250 47666.7177 47546.2221 47875.9352 48517.2228    20
#   stri_fixed(x)   261.4303   265.9189   270.5816   268.6038   273.2486   288.7071    20

It appears that stri_detect_regex is the fastest. Interestingly, this changed from the last iteration I tried when I had ^.* and .*$ in the regex. Credit to @Gregor for pointing this out. Note that your original sapply is very slow because it is performing the grepl search many times (once for each element). Rather than only once for the whole vector.


Lastly, the results for longer individual strings:

prefixes <- replicate(1e6, paste0(sample(LETTERS, sample(100:200), replace = TRUE), collapse = ""))
suffixes <- replicate(1e6, paste0(sample(LETTERS, sample(200:300), replace = TRUE), collapse = ""))
x_long <- paste0(prefixes, x, suffixes)

microbenchmark::microbenchmark(multi_grepl(x_long),
                               one_grepl(x_long),
                               detect_regex(x_long),
                               stri_fixed(x_long), times = 20L)

#Unit: seconds
#                 expr       min        lq      mean    median        uq       max neval
#  multi_grepl(x_long) 27.654274 27.721042 28.194273 27.962656 28.626697 29.909105    20
#    one_grepl(x_long) 11.478831 11.510868 11.775088 11.583650 11.663479 14.318680    20
# detect_regex(x_long)  8.673534  8.729508  8.808797  8.774432  8.878907  9.028005    20
#   stri_fixed(x_long)  4.502196  4.540850  4.609050  4.591879  4.690035  4.750445    20
  • 1
    The use of ^.* and .*$ is not necessary and actually counter-productive. I think you'll see faster times without it. – MrFlick Jan 10 '18 at 17:05
  • 1
    I think I found a faster solution: stringi::stri_detect_fixed. Can't combine the patterns (because it's not regex), but the byte comparison is enough faster that it's almost twice as fast as the one_grepl solution. stri_fixed = function(x) { stri_detect_fixed(x, pattern = "TORNAD") | stri_detect_fixed(x, pattern = "SPOUT") | stri_detect_fixed(x, pattern = "WHIRL") | stri_detect_fixed(x, pattern = "FUNNEL") | stri_detect_fixed(x, pattern = "ROTATING WALL CLOUD") | stri_detect_fixed(x, pattern = "DUST DEVIL") } – Gregor Jan 10 '18 at 17:14
  • 1
    If you're feeling ambitious, I'm also curious how the rankings would compare if the individual strings were longer. I was surprised by your initial rankings because I found stringi faster in a recent project where each string was the first 200 words of an email. – Gregor Jan 10 '18 at 17:16
  • 2
    Also, interestingly, when I delete the ^.* and .*$ as MrFlick suggests, the ranking changes completely with detect_regex on top, my stri_fixed method in 2nd, and one_grepl in a distant 3rd. – Gregor Jan 10 '18 at 17:20
  • 1
    I'm glad I posted the question; there's a lot of useful insight here. The time on my sapply is reflective of how the run time felt. – Conner M. Jan 11 '18 at 1:05
1

Regular expressions themselves can use | as an OR match. You can just do

tornado  <- grepl("(TORNAD|SPOUT|WHIRL|FUNNEL|ROTATING WALL CLOUD|DUST DEVIL)", as.character(noaa_clean$EVTYPE))

Also note we did not need to use sapply() as grepl is already a vectorized function in R.

  • Are the ^.* and .*$ necessary for grepl to look for the occurrences anywhere in the string? – Conner M. Jan 10 '18 at 16:57
  • Depending on your preference, (loading lists of strings from a file for example) you can use paste0 to create a search string from a vector of words. grepl(paste0(Words,collapse = '|'),noaa_clean$EVTYPE) – Bishops_Guest Jan 10 '18 at 16:58
  • 2
    @ConnerM. They are not necessary; these type of regular expressions already look anywhere in a string. – MrFlick Jan 10 '18 at 17:01

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