I'm using pyodbc to query to an SQL Server database

import datetime
import pyodbc    
conn = pyodbc.connect("Driver={SQL Server};Server='dbserver',Database='db',
                       TrustedConnection=Yes")
cursor = conn.cursor()
ratings = ("PG-13", "PG", "G")
st_dt = datetime(2010, 1, 1)
end_dt = datetime(2010, 12, 31)
cursor.execute("""Select title, director, producer From movies 
                Where rating In ? And release_dt Between ? And ?""", 
                ratings, str(st_dt), str(end_dt))

but am receiving the error below. Does the tuple parameter need to be handled in a different way? Is there a better way to structure this query?

('42000', "[42000] [Microsoft][ODBC SQL Server Driver][SQL Server]Line 9: 
  Incorrect syntax near '@P1'. (170) (SQLExecDirectW); 
  [42000] [Microsoft][ODBC SQL Server Driver][SQL Server]
  Statement(s) could not be prepared. (8180)")

UPDATE:

I was able to get this query to work using the string formatting operator, which isn't ideal as it introduces security concerns.

import datetime
import pyodbc    
conn = pyodbc.connect("Driver={SQL Server};Server='dbserver',Database='db',
                       TrustedConnection=Yes")
cursor = conn.cursor()
ratings = ("PG-13", "PG", "G")
st_dt = datetime(2010, 1, 1)
end_dt = datetime(2010, 12, 31)
cursor.execute("""Select title, director, producer From movies 
                Where rating In %s And release_dt Between '%s' And '%s'""" % 
                (ratings, st_dt, end_dt))
up vote 12 down vote accepted

You cannot parameterize multiple values in an IN () clause using a single string parameter. The only way to accomplish that is:

  1. String substitution (as you did).

  2. Build a parameterized query in the form IN (?, ?, . . ., ?) and then pass in a separate parameter for each place holder. I'm not an expert at Python to ODBC but I imagine that this is particularly easy to do in a language like Python. This is safer because you get the full value of parameterization.

  • 1
    For your second option, would one need to dynamically create the SQL statement based on the size of the tuple one wished to pass to the IN statement? – user338714 Feb 3 '11 at 0:58
  • 2
    You can do something like: cursor.execute("SELECT * FROM movies WHERE rating IN ({})".format(','.join('?' * len(ratings))), ratings) – rleelr Sep 9 '16 at 15:38

To expand on Larry's second option - dynamically creating a parameterized string, I used the following successfully:

placeholders = ",".join("?" * len(code_list))
sql = "delete from dbo.Results where RESULT_ID = ? AND CODE IN (%s)" % placeholders
params = [result_id]
params.extend(code_list)
cursor.execute(sql, params)

Gives the following SQL with the appropriate parameters:

delete from dbo.Results where RESULT_ID = ? AND CODE IN (?,?,?)

The problem is your tuple. The ODBC connection is expecting a string to construct the query and you are sending a python tuple. And remember that you have to get the string quoting correct. I'm assuming that the number of ratings you will be looking for varies. There is probably a better way, but my pyodbc tends to be simple and straightforward.

Try the following:

import datetime
import pyodbc    
conn = pyodbc.connect("Driver={SQL Server};Server='dbserver',Database='db',
                       TrustedConnection=Yes")

def List2SQLList(items):
    sqllist = "%s" % "\",\"".join(items)
    return sqllist


cursor = conn.cursor()
ratings = ("PG-13", "PG", "G")
st_dt = datetime(2010, 1, 1)
end_dt = datetime(2010, 12, 31)
cursor.execute("""Select title, director, producer From movies 
                Where rating In (?) And release_dt Between ? And ?""", 
                List2SQLList(ratings), str(st_dt), str(end_dt))
  • I'm still receiving an "Incorrect syntax" error for the 1st parameter. Could pyodbc be treating the list like a string instead of a list? – user338714 Jan 27 '11 at 21:54
  • Its putting "'s around the entire string. See my edit. – WombatPM Jan 27 '11 at 22:30
  • I'm still receiving a parameter error. I did find a way to get the query to work using the string format operator (see my update above), and since this code will only be run locally, the security concerns can probably be overlooked. I think cursor.executemany may be another option. – user338714 Jan 28 '11 at 2:41

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