59

In PHP, I sometimes catch some exceptions with try/catch :

try {
    ...
} catch (Exception $e) {
    // Nothing, this is a test that an exception is thrown.
}

With that kind of code, I end up with the variable $e that is created for nothing (lots of resources), and PHP_MD (PHP Mess Detector) creates a warning because of an unused variable.

0

6 Answers 6

41

Starting with PHP 8, it is possible to use a non-capturing catch.

This is the relevant RFC, which was voted favourably 48-1.

Now it will be possible to do something like this:

try {
    readFile($file);
} catch (FileDoesNotExist) {
    echo "File does not exist";
} catch (UnauthorizedAccess) {
    echo "User does not have the appropriate permissions to access the file";
    log("User attempted to access $file");
}

With this, for some edge cases where the exception details are not relevant and exception type already provides all the necessary context, it will be possible to catch the exception without creating a new variable.

2
  • Could you provide some education documentation on how this works without a Throw? I'm checking my usual spots, but they are all made for <8.0
    – jpgerb
    Commented May 10, 2022 at 5:32
  • @jpgerb Obviously, a throw is needed somewhere. Here, it's assumed that readFile() will throw whatever exceptions, hence is wrapped in a try/catch block.
    – yivi
    Commented Nov 14, 2023 at 7:08
20

You can with PHP 8 @see

PHP 5,7

No, but you can unset it.

try {
    ...
} catch (Exception $e) {
    // Nothing, this is normal
    unset($e);
}

If it is PHPMD causing this issue then you can suppress the warning.

PHPMD suppress-warnings

class Bar {
    /**
     * This will suppress UnusedLocalVariable
     * warnings in this method
     *
     * @SuppressWarnings(PHPMD.UnusedLocalVariable)
     */
    public function foo() {

        try {
            ...
        } catch (Exception $e) {
            // Nothing, this is normal
            unset($e);
        }
    }
}

I'm assuming you are only catching the exception because you need to not because you want to. With PHP 5,7 you have to use a catch if you want to use try and if you use a catch you have to declare a variable.

8

That's the whole point of exceptions - you can have multiple different catch blocks to catch any exceptions you'd want to handle. The exception's data has to be assigned somewhere, hence the variable. You could just do something like unset($e) inside the catch block if you really don't want to see those warnings... or disable the warnings (generally a bad idea).

1
  • 1
    There are legitimate scenarios where it's perfectly fine to do nothing with the exception data
    – James
    Commented Mar 14, 2023 at 10:24
8

I disagree fundamentally with Marc B's and Artefacto's answers. There are cases where ommitting the catch is better or even the only option. Especially when using external libraries (where you have no control over what exceptions are thrown) and/or async operations.

For example:

I want to create a file only if it doesn't exist yet. I'm using an external I/O library. Imagine it has File::exists($fileName) and File::create($fileName) methods.

Option 1 (if ommitting the catch was possible):

try {
    File::create($fileName);
}
// Go on with the rest of the code.

Option 2 (without try/catch):

if (!File::exists($fileName))
    File::create($fileName);

Here, option 1 is perfectly valid, since option 2 has two important issues:

  1. If multiple threads are running and going through this code section at the same time, it could be that thread A first checks if the file exists. Next, thread B checks if the file exists. They both find that it doesn't exist. Thread A creates the file. Thread B then attempts to create it again and throws an exception even though you're using the if check.
  2. It's very likely that the library itself already performs the !File::exists($fileName) check. Therefore you're wasting a call that is already made.

Note that if File::create throws other exceptions that might be unexpected it would be good to catch those.

Conclusion

Stating that something is never a good idea, is almost never a good idea. There are always exceptions (hehe) to the rule. Like any convention or design pattern, it's just a rule of thumb meant to help less experienced developers make the right decision.

2
  • You should at least log that exception occurred. Not doing anything in catch blocks creates 'black holes' in your code - something is not working and you don't know why - and there is no way for you to trace it other than running debugger line by line until problem occurs.
    – superrafal
    Commented Jan 23, 2019 at 17:40
  • 2
    @superrafal that's not the case in my example at all. I know exactly what exception is thrown, and want to ignore it and move on. Why would I need to log every time something harmless and predictable happens? Commented Jan 28, 2019 at 23:12
7

No.

In any case, it's generally a bad idea to catch an exception and do nothing; exceptions exist precisely to force you to handle the exceptional circumstance (otherwise execution is aborted), so it's comprehensible the language doesn't facilitate such a use case.

1
  • 6
    At the same time, it is generally a bad idea to throw an exception when you probably just need a status code. If exceptions were actually exceptional we wouldn't see so many useless try/catch blocks. In particular, a lot of network utilities throw exceptions whenever there is a network issue, which breaks encapsulation and doesn't really help the programmer. A network problem shouldn't exceptional when you are a network utility, you should be able to handle it internally. Commented Jan 27, 2011 at 20:09
2

As of PHP 8.0 it may be typed without variables, but the general case for each Exception is now Throwable. Class Exception implements Throwable.

try {
    ...
} catch (CustomException) {
    // CustomException
} catch (Throwable) {
    //All other classes implementing Throwable interface
}

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