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I am developing an Nodejs application and using AAD to secure an Azure function.

There would multiple Nodejs clients but I don't need to have a single user for each one of them (all the instances are should be treated as the same client).

How should I go about implementing this and is there any security concerns?

Edit

The protected resource is an Azure Function with a HTTP trigger.

I just want to limit the access to people who have the NodeJs client Installed. I don't want the user to enter his credentials. My question is which flow should I use and how should I go about that?

  • Which authorization flow are you using? Which kind of your function are you using? Also tell us details about the Node.js clients. – Aaron Chen Jan 12 '18 at 8:51
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    Please better describe what do you want to achieve. At the end of the day, nothing will stop you from using single App Registration for multiple NodeJS Apps. The question is - how to you imagine to manage your solution and track what is happening in the authentication layer (who logs-in for which application and when). – astaykov Jan 12 '18 at 9:28
  • I just want to limit the access to people who have the NodeJs client Installed. I don't want the user to enter his credentials. My question is which flow should I use and how should I go about that? – LonsomeHell Jan 12 '18 at 11:50
  • The protected resource is an Azure Function. – LonsomeHell Jan 12 '18 at 13:30
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If you do not want to use the user's credentials, then please evaluate the Azure Active Directory v2.0 and the OAuth 2.0 client credentials flow.

This type of grant commonly is used for server-to-server interactions that must run in the background, without immediate interaction with a user.

While this advised solution may not look like an exact fit, you can use the admin consent and make this work for you. There are additional considerations like securing the credentials on each machine that you also have to look at.

in the client credentials flow, permissions are granted directly to the application itself. When the app presents a token to a resource, the resource enforces that the app itself has authorization to perform an action, and not that the user has authorization.

If this looks promising, then also look at the azure-activedirectory-library-for-nodejs to get you going.

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