8

My understanding is that you cannot reference a variable before it has been declared, and that all code (including instance initializers) that is within the body of a class, but outside of any method, is executed in order before constructor when the object is created (the exception being static variables and initializer blocks, which are run in order at the beginning of the program, to initialize the entire class). Why, then, does the following code compile (and run!):

public class WhyIsThisOk {
    { a = 5; } // why is this ok???
    int a = 10;

    public WhyIsThisOk() {
    }

    public static void main(String[] args) {
        WhyIsThisOk why = new WhyIsThisOk();
        System.out.println(why.a); // 10
    }
}
2
  • You should probably also write what it prints (I'm guessing 5?)
    – phflack
    Jan 11, 2018 at 21:16
  • 1
    it prints 10. cause this is the last set
    – devops
    Jan 11, 2018 at 21:21

5 Answers 5

6

From docs:

The Java compiler copies initializer blocks into every constructor. Therefore, this approach can be used to share a block of code between multiple constructors.

The above statement is slightly misleading, because if we follow the explanation of the above doc we can rewrite the original code like this:

public class WrongVersionOfWhyIsThisOk {

    int a = 10;

    public WhyIsThisOk (){
        a = 5;
    }

    public static void main(String[] args){
        WrongVersionOfWhyIsThisOk why = new WrongVersionOfWhyIsThisOk ();
        System.out.println(why.a);
    }
}

But running WrongVersionOfWhyIsThisOk will produce 5 instead of 10 that original code produces.

But in reality it is both the initializer block and variable assignment are copied into constructor:

public class RightVersionOfWhyIsThisOk {

    int a;

    public RightVersionOfWhyIsThisOk (){
        a = 5;
        a = 10;
    }

    public static void main(String[] args){
        RightVersionOfWhyIsThisOk why = new RightVersionOfWhyIsThisOk ();
        System.out.println(why.a);
    }
}

Update:

Here is the doc describing in detail the initialization order and constructor invocation:

4) Execute the instance initializers and instance variable initializers for this class, assigning the values of instance variable initializers to the corresponding instance variables, in the left-to-right order in which they appear textually in the source code for the class. If execution of any of these initializers results in an exception, then no further initializers are processed and this procedure completes abruptly with that same exception. Otherwise, continue with step 5.

5) Execute the rest of the body of this constructor. If that execution completes abruptly, then this procedure completes abruptly for the same reason. Otherwise, this procedure completes normally.

3
  • This is still strange though, because it prints 10. That means that the "int a = 10;" line is treated as coming first for declaration purposes, but is executed second - is there any explanation for this behavior?
    – Anomaly
    Jan 11, 2018 at 21:30
  • Ok, after your edit this makes more sense, and yours is once again the best answer. I still haven't seen any "official" documentation stating that this is how it happens - as you mention, the official documentation you link to is misleading. I would be happy to see an official enumeration of the rule that the declaration stays where it is, and the rest of the code is "yanked" to the beginning of the constructor in order.
    – Anomaly
    Jan 11, 2018 at 21:47
  • If the first a=5 line is taken out of the initializer block, the code fails to compile, due to being referenced before declaration, but in an initializer block it works just fine. I suppose the reason why is "because that's how it's defined," but I would like to see where it is defined this way.
    – Anomaly
    Jan 11, 2018 at 21:47
3

From docs:

8.3.2.3. Restrictions on the use of Fields during Initialization

The declaration of a member needs to appear textually before it is used only if the member is an instance (respectively static) field of a class or interface C and all of the following conditions hold:

  • The usage occurs in an instance (respectively static) variable initializer of C or in an instance (respectively static) initializer
    of C.

  • The usage is not on the left hand side of an assignment.

  • The usage is via a simple name.

  • C is the innermost class or interface enclosing the usage.

It is a compile-time error if any of the four requirements above are not met

In this case, the usage is on the left hand side of the assignment, so it is not a compile-time error.

0
1

The contents of initializer block are executed whenever any constructor is invoked (before the constructor’s contents).

So you can provide reference to any variables as they will not be used unless a constructor is invoked aka. object is created.

1

The instance initialization blocs are called at the instance creation time.so it is normal that After the creation of the why object, it Works.

The order of initialization is:

  1. static bloc
  2. constructor
  3. instance blocs on order of appearance
0

The order of declaration is not important. You could also write:

public  class WhyIsThisOk {

    {
        a = 5;
    }

    public WhyIsThisOk() {
    }

    public static void main(String[] args) {
        System.out.println(new WhyIsThisOk().a);
    }

    int a = 10;
}

Important is, that the compiler copies (top down) first a=5 and then a=10 into constructor so it looks like:

public WhyIsThisOk() {
    a = 5;
    a = 10;
}

Finally look at this example:

public class WhyIsThisOk {

    {
        a = get5();
    }

    public WhyIsThisOk() {
        a = get7();
    }

    public static void main(String[] args) {
        System.out.println(new WhyIsThisOk().a);
    }

    int a = get10();

    public static int get5() {
        System.out.println("get5 from: " + new Exception().getStackTrace()[1].getMethodName());
        return 5;
    }

    public static int get7() {
        System.out.println("get7 from: " + new Exception().getStackTrace()[1].getMethodName());
        return 7;
    }

    public static int get10() {
        System.out.println("get10 from: " + new Exception().getStackTrace()[1].getMethodName());
        return 10;
    }
}

Output is:

get5 from: <init>
get10 from: <init>
get7 from: <init>
7

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