I am creating my own GA library to build a url to the tracking pixel myself since I need to use GA in a cookie-less environment. But I am stuck on create the domain hash for the cookie format.

In this cookie:

__utma=126394024.179004532335319200.1247654493.1260769004.1260878051.7

The first segment 126394024 is apparently a "domain hash", and while many sites seem to show how it's used, I cant actually figure out how to generate it from a domain. Is this only done by an internal process on google servers that is unknown to the rest of the world? Or is there a way I can hash the domain name myself to produce this token?

  • Out of curiosity, what language are you building it for? – Yahel Jan 27 '11 at 21:08
  • Javascript. It's going into a system that has to work from a file:// url, which sadly does not support cookies. And ga.js requires cookies. – Alex Wayne Jan 27 '11 at 21:22
up vote 11 down vote accepted

Does this work?
http://www.google.com/support/forum/p/Google+Analytics/thread?tid=626b0e277aaedc3c&hl=en

function hash(d){
var a=1,c=0,h,o;
if(d){
a=0;
for(h=d["length"]-1;h>=0;h--){
o=d.charCodeAt(h);
a=(a<<6&268435455)+o+(o<<14);
c=a&266338304;
a=c!=0?a^c>>21:a
}
}
return a
}

Have not verified it myself

  • This works for me. +1 – Yahel Jan 27 '11 at 21:03
  • Awesome, matches a ga.js test run perfectly. Thank you! – Alex Wayne Jan 27 '11 at 21:13

C# version of the above if anyone wants it:

    string hash(string d)
    {
        int a = 1;
        int c = 0;
        int h;
        int o;
        if (!String.IsNullOrEmpty(d))
        {
            a = 0;
            for (h = d.Length - 1; h >= 0; h--)
            {
                o = d[h];
                a = (a << 6 & 268435455) + o + (o << 14);
                c = a & 266338304;
                a = c != 0 ? a ^ c >> 21 : a;
            }
        }
        return a.ToString();
    }
  • works great, thanks – Dan Jun 24 '17 at 20:58

Here is a Java version. This could be useful to anyone needing a Hive UDF. The tricky parts of the translation are the operator precedence of bitwise xor, and the technique of getting at the Unicode. The class definition has been left out in the interest of brevity.

import java.util.List;
import java.util.ArrayList;

static int domain_hash(String s) {
    List<Integer> d = get_string_charCodes(s);
    int a=0,c=0,h,o;
    if (d.size() == 0) {
        return(1);
    }
    for(h = d.size()-1; h >= 0; h--) {
        o = d.get(h);
        a = ((a << 6) & 268435455) + o + (o << 14);
        c = a & 266338304;
        if (c != 0) {
            a = a^(c>>21);
        }
    }
    return(a);
}

static List<Integer> get_string_charCodes(String s) {
    List<Integer> l = new ArrayList<Integer>();
    int length = s.length(), codepoint, offset;
    for(offset = 0; offset < length; offset += Character.charCount(codepoint)) {
        codepoint = s.codePointAt(offset);
        l.add(codepoint);
    }
    return(l);
}

Bit late, but I couldn't find it elsewhere, so for what it's worth here is a PHP version. It works for me, so hopefully it's up to snuff for others.

function hash($d){
    $a = 1;
    $c = 0;     
    if ( $d ){
        $a = 0;
        for ( $h = strlen($d)-1; $h >= 0; $h-- ){
            $o = ord($d[$h]);
            $a = (($a<<6)&268435455)+$o+($o<<14);
            $c = $a&266338304;
            $a = ( $c != 0 )? $a^($c>>21) : $a;
        }
    }
    return $a;
}

Your Answer

 

By clicking "Post Your Answer", you acknowledge that you have read our updated terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy, and that your continued use of the website is subject to these policies.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.