2

I want to check if the file exist on server on multithread environment and if exists return that file content diractly or download from my s3 service server.

My code like this:

final Object lock = new Object();
File file = new File("/file/path");
if (file.exists()) {
    return FileUtils.readFileToByteArray(file);
} else {
    byte[] bytes = this.downloadFileFromRemoteServer();
    if (!file.exists()) {
        synchronized (lock) {
            if(!file.exists()) {
                FileUtils.writeByteArrayToFile(tempFile, bytes);
            }
        }
    }
    tempFile.renameTo(file);
    return bytes;
}

The above code similar java double checked locking, is method file.exists() behavior like volatile keyword? And pseudo code correctly?

  • since your code won't start up the else block unless the file doesn't exist, it seems you have two nonsense (!file.exists()) checks. – Stultuske Jan 12 '18 at 10:21
  • @Stultuske This is a concurrent environment, other processes may be writing to the file. – dasblinkenlight Jan 12 '18 at 10:22
2

File.exists() checks the file existence with the file-system, and so it should behave like a volatile, so you are covered there

Some issues though -

1) As soon as a thread sees that the file doesn't exist, it starts downloading the file, which is time consuming, so its likely that other threads will also come and start downloading the same file. So the download part should be moved inside the lock

2) You're renaming the temp file outside the lock. A thread may get to that point without creating/writing-to a temp file. Should move the rename inside the lock as-well

Since IO has much more overhead than locking, I think the above 2 steps would be beneficial

  • I still can not understand File.exsits() method behave like a volatile.Can you tell me more? – Ryanqy Jan 12 '18 at 17:00
  • 1
    Declaring a variable as volatile guarantees that it's latest value is always visible to all threads. But you only need to do this for shared data living in (and managed by) the JVM. When you change the state of things that are outside the JVM (e.g. inserting a row in a DB or creating a file on the disk), then that state would be visible to any thread who goes and looks at it (assuming that the thread is checking that state itself directly. Not via a shared variable that was set by some other thread) – Ashutosh A Jan 12 '18 at 17:26
0

You are overly cautious: since you are writing to a temp file, there is no risk of overwriting an existing file, which carries a possibility of reading a half-written file: your reads are going to be consistent.

The only issue that your code is protecting against is writing the same downloaded content into multiple temporary files, which is not much of a performance problem in comparison to multiple downloads, which would happen anyway.

I would simplify your code as follows:

File file = new File("/file/path");
if (!file.exists()) {
    byte[] bytes = this.downloadFileFromRemoteServer();
    File tempFile = File.createTempFile(...);
    FileUtils.writeByteArrayToFile(tempFile, bytes);
    tempFile.renameTo(file);
}
return FileUtils.readFileToByteArray(file);

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