5

Ok, I am working on some unit testing, and my understanding is (based on "The Art of Unit Testing" by Roy Osherove) that if you're hitting a DB or actually saving a file, you're integration testing, not unit testing.

Given that, I have the following (yes, I know this violates SRP, but it illustrates my point):

public class PrimeChecker : IPrimeChecker
{
    public bool IsPrime(int num)
    {
        if (num < 2)
        {
            return false;
        }

        if (num > 2 && num % 2 == 0)
        {
            return false;
        }

        if (num % 2 != 0)
        {
            for (int i = 3; (i * i) <= num; i += 2)
            {
                if (num % i == 0)
                {
                    return false;
                }
            }
        }

        return true;
    }

    public bool Save()
    {
        return true;
    }
}

Note the the Save() method is simply a stub right now.

I'm trying to use Moq to simulate saving. So my test looks like this:

[Test]
    public void Save_WhenCalled_ExecutesSave()
    {
        var mock = new Mock<IPrimeChecker>();

        mock.Setup(x => x.Save());

        IPrimeChecker checker = mock.Object;
        checker.Save();

        mock.Verify(x => x.Save(), Times.Once);
    }

So if I had a fully-functioning Save() method in my class, is this the correct way to mock functionality? Because as I previously stated, my understanding is that for unit tests, I'm not supposed to actually write a file/save to a DB.

If this isn't correct, what should I be doing?

6
  • 1
    You are basically testing the mocking framework here. This appears to be an XY problem. What is the ultimate goal you are trying to achieve? – Nkosi Jan 12 '18 at 14:15
  • 1
    you would mock that interface as a dependency of some other class under test. then you setup and assertion would make sense. – Nkosi Jan 12 '18 at 14:16
  • What I'm trying to do is put together some Unit Testing examples for my company, but I want to make sure I'm doing it right. So how would I test a Save() method, without actually, you know, saving data? I guess that's the question, using Moq. – MJR Jan 12 '18 at 14:30
  • By mocking the thing that actually does the saving, provided that it was designed properly so as to allow it to be mocked/stubbed/faked. This is more about using good design practices that allow for testable code. – Nkosi Jan 12 '18 at 14:35
  • 2
    Note that if you're working with the file system, the built in API's are difficult to mock. But System.IO.Abstractions can make that a lot easier. – mason Jan 12 '18 at 14:52
5

Assume your checker has a dependency on something needed to save.

Lets say

public interface IPrimeDb {
    bool Save(int prime);
}

And the checker looked like this

public class PrimeChecker {
    private IPrimeDb primeDb;

    public PrimeChecker(IPrimeDb db) {
        this.primeDb = db;
    }

    public bool IsPrime(int num) {
        if (num < 2) {
            return false;
        }

        if (num > 2 && num % 2 == 0) {
            return false;
        }

        if (num % 2 != 0) {
            for (int i = 3; (i * i) <= num; i += 2) {
                if (num % i == 0) {
                    return false;
                }
            }
        }

        return true;
    }

    public bool Save(int prime) {
        if (IsPrime(prime))
            return primeDb.Save(prime);

        return false;
    }
}

A test to test that the save is being called when a valid prime is provided can look like this.

[TestMethod]
public void Save_WhenCalled_ExecutesSave() {
    //Arrange
    var num = 3;
    var mock = new Mock<IPrimeDb>();

    var sut = new PrimeChecker(mock.Object);

    mock.Setup(_ => _.Save(num)).Returns(sut.IsPrime(num));

    //Act
    var actual = sut.Save(num);

    //Assert
    Assert.IsTrue(actual);
    mock.Verify(_ => _.Save(num), Times.AtMostOnce());
}

When unit testing you tend to mock the dependencies of the subject under test so as to avoid undesirable behavior. This allows the test to be exercised in isolation.

5
  • So if I understand you correctly, based on your example, when you call the "Act": var actual = sut.Save(num); this doesn't actually save the data, correct? – MJR Jan 12 '18 at 14:32
  • @MJR correct it is hitting the mocked db and not an actual db. this was possible because the db was abstracted behind an interface abstraction. – Nkosi Jan 12 '18 at 14:36
  • This did exactly what I wanted, @Nkosi. Thank you very much! This brings up another question, though: How can I mock an actual class? I'm working on putting together a Unit Testing presentation for my company, and my boss wanted me to do a "sample" project (the one above), and some Unit Test examples from real, production code. – MJR Jan 12 '18 at 20:54
  • @MJR mocking a class can mean many things so you would need to clarify what you mean exactly by that. Moq can mock classes but the members/propeties to be mocked must be virtual or abstract. – Nkosi Jan 12 '18 at 23:47
  • @Nkosi...I get what you're saying. What I mean is, in the example above, substituting IPrimeDb for PrimeDb, so you have something like var mock = new Mock<PrimeDb>(); instead of mock = new Mock<IPrimeDb>(); – MJR Jan 15 '18 at 13:51

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