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I am searching through a large number of possible outcomes and, while I may not find the perfect outcome, I would like to score the various outcomes to see how close they come to ideal. (I think I'm talking about some kind of weighted scoring, but don't let that influence your answer in case I'm completely off base.)

For some context, I'm generating a variety of work schedules and would like to have each result scored such that I don't have to look at them individually (it's a brute force approach, and there are literally billions of solutions) to determine if one is better or worse than any other one.

Input-wise, for each generated schedule, I have a 3x14 array that holds the total number of people that are scheduled to work each shift on any given day (i.e. for each day in a two-week period, the number of people working days, swings, and mids on that day).

So far, I have tried:

A) summing the values in each row, then multiplying each sum (row) by a weight (e.g. row 0 sum * 1, row 1 sum * 2, row 2 sum * 3, etc.), and finally adding together the weighted sums

function calcScore(a)
    dim iCol, iTotalD, iTotalM, iTotalS

    for iCol = 0 to 13
        iTotalD = iTotalD + a(0)(iCol)
        iTotalS = iTotalS + a(1)(iCol)
        iTotalM = iTotalM + a(2)(iCol)
    next

    calcScore = iTotalD + iTotalS * 2 + iTotalM * 3
end function

And

B) multiplying each value in each row by a weight (e.g. row 0(0) * 1, row 0(1) * 2, row 0(2) * 3, etc.), and then summing the weighted values of each row

function calcScore(a)
    dim iCol, iTotalD, iTotalM, iTotalS

    for iCol = 0 to 13
        iTotalD = iTotalD + a(0)(iCol) * (iCol + 1)
        iTotalS = iTotalS + a(1)(iCol) * (iCol + 1)
        iTotalM = iTotalM + a(2)(iCol) * (iCol + 1)
    next

    calcScore = iTotalD + iTotalS + iTotalM
end function

Below are some sample inputs (schedules), both ideal and non-ideal. Note that in my ideal example, each row is the same all the way across (e.g. all 4's, or all 3's), but that will not necessarily be the case in real-world usage. My plan is to score my ideal schedule, and compare the score of other schedules to it.

 Ideal:
        Su Mo Tu We ...
   Day: 4  4  4  4  ...
 Swing: 3  3  3  3  ...
   Mid: 2  2  2  2  ...

 Not Ideal:
        Su Mo Tu We ...
   Day: 3  4  4  4  [D(0) is not 4]
 Swing: 3  3  3  3
   Mid: 2  2  2  2

 Not Ideal:
        Su Mo Tu We ...
   Day:  4  4  4  4
 Swing:  3  3  4  3  [S(2) is not 3]
   Mid:  0  2  2  2  [M(0) is not 2]
  • Not sure if I understand correct, but it seems you have an optimal/ideal/perfect solution and want to compare other solutions to it. If this is the case you can just compute the sum of (maybe squared) errors. If you need a score you can invert the error. – SaiBot Jan 12 '18 at 16:34
  • Is this what you're referring to: wikihow.com/Calculate-the-Sum-of-Squares-for-Error-(SSE) – Brian Jan 12 '18 at 16:44
  • No, the site calculates the sum of squared errors to the mean. I mean you just calculate the sum of squared differences between a solution and the optimal. So you basically look at each entry of your matrix and calculate the difference. Sum these squared differences up and you get the error. If you want you do not have to use the squaring. – SaiBot Jan 12 '18 at 16:50
  • If it may, or may not, be squared, what is the argument for doing one versus doing the other? – Brian Jan 12 '18 at 18:01
  • It depends how you want to treat errors. E.g., do you want to treat one error of 2 equal to two errors of 1? Then ommit the square. Usually, you want to avoid larger errors, in this case people often use the squared error. – SaiBot Jan 12 '18 at 18:13
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Summarizing my comments into an answer.

So you have an optimal/ideal/perfect solution and want to compare other solutions to it. In this case you could for example compute the sum of (squared) errors. If you need a score you can invert the error.

Specifically, you would have to calculate the sum of (squared) differences between a solution and the optimal by looking at each entry of your matrix and calculating the difference. Sum these (squared) differences up and you get the error.

For the examples you gave the sum of errors are as follows:

E(Ideal, Not Ideal 1) = 1
E(Ideal, Not Ideal 2) = 3

The sum of squared errors would yield the following:

SQE(Ideal, Not Ideal 1) = 1
SQE(Ideal, Not Ideal 2) = 5

Usually, the sum of squared errors is used in order to penalize larger errors more than several small errors.

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