57

We have a structure that is like the following:

export type LinkRestSource = {
    model: string;
    rel?: string;
    title?: string;
} | {
    model?: string;
    rel: string;
    title?: string;
} | {
    model?: string;
    rel?: string;
    title: string;
};

Which is almost the same as saying

type LinkRestSource = Partial<{model: string, rel: string, title: string}>

Except that this will allow an empty object to be passed in whereas the initial type requires one of the properties to be passed in

How can I create a generic like Partial, but that behaves like my structure above?

4
  • Why do you need such a constraint? – Justinas Marozas Jan 12 '18 at 22:27
  • 4
    Because it's invalid and I don't want to have yo programmatically check that at least one property is set, I want the compiler to do my work while avoiding the duplication in my example – Juan Mendes Jan 13 '18 at 0:00
  • All your attributes are optional. You'll have to check if the one you care about has value anyway. You're not winning anything with your approach. – Justinas Marozas Jan 13 '18 at 0:05
  • 3
    @justinas no, they are optional but one of them must be passed in – Juan Mendes Jan 16 '18 at 0:57
97

I think I have a solution for you. You're looking for something that takes a type T and produces a related type which contains at least one property from T. That is, it's like Partial<T> but excludes the empty object.

If so, here it is:

type AtLeastOne<T, U = {[K in keyof T]: Pick<T, K> }> = Partial<T> & U[keyof U]

To dissect it: first of all, AtLeastOne<T> is Partial<T> intersected with something. U[keyof U] means that it's the union of all property values of U. And I've defined (the default value of) U to be a mapped type where each property of T is mapped to Pick<T, K>, a single-property type for the key K. (For example, Pick<{foo: string, bar: number},'foo'> is equivalent to {foo: string}... it "picks" the 'foo' property from the original type.) Meaning that U[keyof U] in this case is the union of all possible single-property types from T.

Hmm, that might be confusing. Let's see step-by-step how it operates on the following concrete type:

type FullLinkRestSource = {
  model: string;
  rel: string;
  title: string;
}

type LinkRestSource = AtLeastOne<FullLinkRestSource>

That expands to

type LinkRestSource = AtLeastOne<FullLinkRestSource, {
  [K in keyof FullLinkRestSource]: Pick<FullLinkRestSource, K>
}>

or

type LinkRestSource = AtLeastOne<FullLinkRestSource, {
  model: Pick<FullLinkRestSource, 'model'>,
  rel: Pick<FullLinkRestSource, 'rel'>,
  title: Pick<FullLinkRestSource, 'title'>
}>

or

type LinkRestSource = AtLeastOne<FullLinkRestSource, {
  model: {model: string},
  rel: {rel: string},
  title: {title: string}>
}>

or

type LinkRestSource = Partial<FullLinkRestSource> & {
  model: {model: string},
  rel: {rel: string},
  title: {title: string}>
}[keyof {
  model: {model: string},
  rel: {rel: string},
  title: {title: string}>
}]

or

type LinkRestSource = Partial<FullLinkRestSource> & {
  model: {model: string},
  rel: {rel: string},
  title: {title: string}>
}['model' | 'rel' | 'title']

or

type LinkRestSource = Partial<FullLinkRestSource> &
  ({model: string} | {rel: string} | {title: string})

or

type LinkRestSource = {model?: string, rel?: string, title?: string} & 
  ({model: string} | {rel: string} | {title: string})

or

type LinkRestSource = { model: string, rel?: string, title?: string } 
  | {model?: string, rel: string, title?: string} 
  | {model?: string, rel?: string, title: string}

which is, I think, what you want.

You can test it out:

const okay0: LinkRestSource = { model: 'a', rel: 'b', title: 'c' }
const okay1: LinkRestSource = { model: 'a', rel: 'b' }
const okay2: LinkRestSource = { model: 'a' }
const okay3: LinkRestSource = { rel: 'b' }
const okay4: LinkRestSource = { title: 'c' }

const error0: LinkRestSource = {} // missing property
const error1: LinkRestSource = { model: 'a', titel: 'c' } // excess property on string literal

So, does that work for you? Good luck!

8
  • 5
    great work! Interesting solution. TypeScript is very powerful isn't it? – cevek Jan 15 '18 at 19:20
  • 2
    I think it should be in something like typescript hacks repository, very powerful solution – cevek Jan 15 '18 at 19:26
  • 4
    @JuanMendes Here's type AtLeastTwo<T, U = { [K in keyof T]: Pick<T, K> & AtLeastOne<Omit<T, K>> }> = Partial<T> & U[keyof U] – Dykam Aug 23 '19 at 18:31
  • 2
    And here's it for any N properties: gist.github.com/Dykam/2272e696435ee3e37012b065365cedf5 – Dykam Aug 23 '19 at 18:38
  • 1
    @jcalz Awesome type, very useful! I found that it doesn't enforce types that have optional parameters, but found a simple fix by splitting the implementation into two types: type AtLeastOne<T> = Partial<T> & U<Required<T>>[keyof U<T>] and type U<T> = {[K in keyof T]: Pick<T, K>} – Enteleform May 4 '20 at 0:11
26

There's another solution if you know which properties you want.

AtLeast<T, K extends keyof T> = Partial<T> & Pick<T, K>

This would also allow you to lock in multiple keys of a type, e.g. AtLeast<T, 'model' | 'rel'>.

3
  • This is pretty cool. It's really flexible, elegant and easy to understand. However, it's not what I need because if I use your example, it would require both model and rel to be passed in but passing in {rel: "edit"} should work. TS error: Property 'rel' is missing in type '{ model: string; }' but required in type 'Pick<{ model: string; rel: string; title: string; }, "model" | "rel">'. – Juan Mendes Sep 5 '19 at 12:30
  • See typescriptlang.org/play/#code/… – Juan Mendes Sep 5 '19 at 12:30
  • Hey @JuanMendes thank you for the feedback. Yeah, this will only work if you can be explicit about which keys you want, so it's not a strict solution to your problem. I've been thinking for a bit now, and can't come up with another solution besides the one you picked above. It's clever, but a bit confusing (at least for me). – aegatlin Oct 23 '19 at 16:26
12

A simpler version of the solution by jcalz:

type AtLeastOne<T> = { [K in keyof T]: Pick<T, K> }[keyof T]

so the whole implementation becomes

type FullLinkRestSource = {
  model: string;
  rel: string;
  title: string;
}

type AtLeastOne<T> = { [K in keyof T]: Pick<T, K> }[keyof T]
type LinkRestSource = AtLeastOne<FullLinkRestSource>

const okay0: LinkRestSource = { model: 'a', rel: 'b', title: 'c' }
const okay1: LinkRestSource = { model: 'a', rel: 'b' }
const okay2: LinkRestSource = { model: 'a' }
const okay3: LinkRestSource = { rel: 'b' }
const okay4: LinkRestSource = { title: 'c' }

const error0: LinkRestSource = {} // missing property
const error1: LinkRestSource = { model: 'a', titel: 'c' } // excess property on string literal

and here's the TS playground link to try it

2

Maybe something like that:

type X<A, B, C> = (A & Partial<B> & Partial<C>) | (Partial<A> & B & Partial<C>) | (Partial<A> & Partial<B> & C);
type LinkRestSource = X<{ model: string }, { rel: string }, { title: string }>
var d: LinkRestSource = {rel: 'sdf'};  

But it little bit messy :)

or

type Y<A, B, C> = Partial<A & B & C> & (A | B | C);
1
  • 1
    This is along the lines of where I'm trying to get to but it's not generic and would require as much code as what I typed above – Juan Mendes Jan 12 '18 at 19:41
-4

That would not be possible with Partial<T>. Under the hood it looks like this:

type Partial<T> = { [P in keyof T]?: T[P]; };

All properties made optional.

I doubt it is possible (or easy) to enforce your rule via type system.

Could try to create type that employs keyof in a similar way, but have a condition in default constructor.

If you can think of a way to declare a type like Partial that builds a matrix of types like yours emitting ? for a different key in each and concat all of them using | like in your first example, you might be able to enforce your rule vie type system.

This blog post on keyof might give you some ideas.

2
  • Sorry, but this should be a comment, it's not an answer. I know Partial is not what I need. – Juan Mendes Jan 12 '18 at 18:45
  • The answer is it's unlikely to be achievable to enforce your constraint using generics and type system alone, because it would require using loop to expand type definition. I also gave you leads on approaches that could potentially work. I'm not going to spend hours to come up with a working solution or definite proof of this not being possible. SO is not a code writing service. – Justinas Marozas Jan 12 '18 at 18:58

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