I am noticing that Spring changed the way RequestParam marshals parameters to Controller end points in Spring 4.2. Namely when I have something like:

public String myEndpoint(@RequestParam List<String> strings) {
   ...
}

Previously HTML input elements that were sent with their value attribute being blank would be included in the list as null. In 4.2 instead they are the empty string.'

Some examples:

/myEndpoint?strings=

results in empty list.

/myEndpoint?string=a&string=

results in ["a", ""] whereas it used to be ["a", null]

I see in the release notes that the behavior for @RequestParam was indeed changed from 4.0 to 4.2. Is there an easy way to make a new class or extend RequestParam to work like it used to so I don't have to change any controller logic?

For example instead of Spring 4.2 RequestParam:

@Target(ElementType.PARAMETER)
@Retention(RetentionPolicy.RUNTIME)
@Documented
public @interface RequestParam {

    @AliasFor("name")
    String value() default "";

    @AliasFor("value")
    String name() default "";

    boolean required() default true;

    String defaultValue() default ValueConstants.DEFAULT_NONE;

}

Make my own annotation to mimic Spring 4.0:

@Target(ElementType.PARAMETER)
@Retention(RetentionPolicy.RUNTIME)
@Documented
public @interface MyRequestParam {

    String value() default "";

    boolean required() default true;

    String defaultValue() default ValueConstants.DEFAULT_NONE;

}

Is this the easiest way forward?

EDIT:

So it seems the above approach does not work. It fail with a "Cannot instantiate List" error so I guess Spring is looking specifically for RequestParam to do its work.

  • I'm not in a position to test this, but have you thought passing "" to Spring's annotation? – Makoto Jan 12 at 21:28
  • @Makoto Not sure what you mean by that. Could you provide a code sample/ – thatidiotguy Jan 13 at 22:48

Although there was a change in the behavior of @RequestParam, I don't believe that is the cause of the problem you have.

  • All the attributes of the @RequestParam annotation pertain only to the argument it annotates, the List<String> strings in your case. It has nothing to do with the actual elements/values of the List.

If you look at RequestParamMethodArgumentResolver, which resolves the @RequestParam argument, Request parameters are added to the List<String> as they appear in the raw request object:

String[] paramValues = request.getParameterValues(name);
if (paramValues != null) {
    arg = (paramValues.length == 1 ? paramValues[0] : paramValues);
}

...

return arg;

Possible Solution It appears that the argument is converted from a String[] to a List<String> via the CustomCollectionEditor that is registered by default. You could add a custom editor to configure its functionality so that every empty string in the String[]/request parameters ends up as null in your List<String>.

  1. Extend the CustomCollectionEditor and override the convertElement(Object) method:

    MyCollectionEditor extends CustomCollectionEditor {
    
        @Override
        protected Object convertElement(Object element) {
            if(element instanceof String) {
                element = (String) element;
                // "" will be null
                element = (element.isEmpty()) ? null : element;
            }
    
            return element;
    }
    
  2. Add the editor to the binder in your @InitBinder method in your controller.

    @InitBinder
    public void myBinder(DataBinder binder) {
        //...
    
        binder.registerCustomEditor(...);
    
        //...
    }
    

Let me know if this works for you!

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