26

Given a float, say (2.0), I want to convert it to an Integer type. It looks like Integer.parse only works for strings as far as I can tell.

Integer.parse(2.0)
(FunctionClauseError) no function clause matching in Integer.count_digits/2

3 Answers 3

41

Use trunc(2.0) or round(2.0). Those are auto-imported since they are part of Kernel and they are also allowed in guard clauses.

1
  • 1
    FWIW: round/1 still returns a Float at this point -- trunc/1 will convert to Integer. Apr 26, 2021 at 20:04
27

To summarize the different answers listed on this question, there are good four options as of writing this: trunc/1, round/1, floor/1, and ceil/1. All accept both floats and integers.

trunc/1

Removes the decimal part of a float.

iex> trunc(2.3)
2
iex> trunc(-2.3)
-2

round/1

Rounds to the nearest integer.

iex> round(2.3)
2
iex> round(2.7)
3
iex> round(-2.3)
-2
iex> round(-2.7)
-3

floor/1

Always rounds down. Available as of Elixir 1.8.0.

iex> floor(2.3)
2
iex> floor(-2.3)
-3

ceil/1

Always rounds up. Available as of Elixir 1.8.0.

iex> ceil(2.3)
3
iex> ceil(-2.3)
-2
3
  • Changed the accepted answer to this one since my brain remembers floor() a lot easier than trunc(). It's the most similar to other programming languages Dec 12, 2020 at 7:54
  • 1
    @AnilRedshift floor() returns unexpected value with negative number, in your problem(you need integer part not floor), e.g: floor(-4.2) will return -5 but you expect -4.
    – CJay
    Jan 19, 2021 at 20:00
  • @AminSoheyli you make a very good point. I'll change this answer to reflect the different options with trunc/1, round/1, floor/1, and ceil/1.
    – nbwoodward
    Jan 19, 2021 at 20:45
1

Use trunc(number) function which is a Kernel function and auto-imported.

Elixir Docs of this function:

Returns the integer part of number.


Examples:

trunc(5.4)    -->    5

trunc(-5.99)  -->   -5

trunc(-5)     -->   -5

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