19

Given an arbitrary list of column names in a data.table, I want to concatenate the contents of those columns into a single string stored in a new column. The columns I need to concatenate are not always the same, so I need to generate the expression to do so on the fly.

I have a sneaking suspicion that way I'm using the eval(parse(...)) call could be replaced with something a bit more elegant, but the method below is the fastest I've been able to get it so far.

With 10 million rows, this takes about 21.7 seconds on this sample data (base R paste0 takes slightly longer -- 23.6 seconds). My actual data has 18-20 columns being concatenated and up to 100 million rows, so the slowdown becomes a little more impractical.

Any ideas to get this sped up?


Current methods

library(data.table)
library(stringi)

RowCount <- 1e7
DT <- data.table(x = "foo",
                 y = "bar",
                 a = sample.int(9, RowCount, TRUE),
                 b = sample.int(9, RowCount, TRUE),
                 c = sample.int(9, RowCount, TRUE),
                 d = sample.int(9, RowCount, TRUE),
                 e = sample.int(9, RowCount, TRUE),
                 f = sample.int(9, RowCount, TRUE))

## Generate an expression to paste an arbitrary list of columns together
ConcatCols <- c("x","a","b","c","d","e","f","y")
PasteStatement <- stri_c('stri_c(',stri_c(ConcatCols,collapse = ","),')')
print(PasteStatement)

gives

[1] "stri_c(x,a,b,c,d,e,f,y)"

which is then used to concatenate the columns with the following expression:

DT[,State := eval(parse(text = PasteStatement))]

Sample of output:

     x   y a b c d e f        State
1: foo bar 4 8 3 6 9 2 foo483692bar
2: foo bar 8 4 8 7 8 4 foo848784bar
3: foo bar 2 6 2 4 3 5 foo262435bar
4: foo bar 2 4 2 4 9 9 foo242499bar
5: foo bar 5 9 8 7 2 7 foo598727bar

Profiling Results

Flame Graph Data


Update 1: fread, fwrite, and sed

Following @Gregor 's suggestion, tried using sed to do the concatenation on disk. Thanks to data.table's blazing fast fread and fwrite functions, I was able to write out the columns to disk, eliminate comma delimiters using sed ,and then read back in the post-processed output in about 18.3 seconds -- not quite fast enough to make the switch, but an interesting tangent nonetheless!

ConcatCols <- c("x","a","b","c","d","e","f","y")
fwrite(DT[,..ConcatCols],"/home/xxx/DT.csv")
system("sed 's/,//g' /home/xxx/DT.csv > /home/xxx/DT_Post.csv ")
Post <- fread("/home/xxx/DT_Post.csv")
DT[,State := Post[[1]]]

Breakdown of the 18.3 overall seconds (unable to use profvis since sed is invisible to the R profiler)

  • data.table::fwrite() - 0.5 seconds
  • sed- 14.8 seconds
  • data.table::fread() - 3.0 seconds
  • := - 0.0 seconds

If nothing else, this is a testament to the extensive work of the data.table authors on performance optimizations for disk IO. (I'm using the 1.10.5 development version that adds multi-threading to fread, fwrite has been multithreaded for some time).

One caveat: if there is a workaround to write the file using fwrite and a blank separator as suggested by @Gregor in another comment below, then this method could plausibly be cut down to ~3.5 seconds!

Update on this tangent: forked data.table and commented out the line requiring a separator greater than length 0, mysteriously got some spaces instead? After causing a handful of segfaults trying to mess around with the C internals I put this one on ice for the time being. Ideal solution would not require writing to disk and would keep everything in memory.


Update 2: sprintf for Integer Specific Cases

A second update here: While I included strings in my original usage example, my actual use case exclusively concatenates integer values (which can always be assumed non-null based on upstream cleaning steps).

Since the usage case is highly specific and differs from the original question I won't directly compare timings to those previously posted. However, one takeaway is that while stringi nicely handles many character encoding formats, mixed vector types without needing to specify them, and does a bunch of error handling out of the box, this does add some time (which is probably worth it for most cases).

By using base R's sprintf function and letting it know up front that all of the inputs will be integers, we can shave off about 30% of the run-time for 5 million rows with 18 integer columns to be calculated. (20.3 seconds instead of 28.9)

library(data.table)
library(stringi)
RowCount <- 5e6
DT <- data.table(x = "foo",
                 y = "bar",
                 a = sample.int(9, RowCount, TRUE),
                 b = sample.int(9, RowCount, TRUE),
                 c = sample.int(9, RowCount, TRUE),
                 d = sample.int(9, RowCount, TRUE),
                 e = sample.int(9, RowCount, TRUE),
                 f = sample.int(9, RowCount, TRUE))

## Generate an expression to paste an arbitrary list of columns together
ConcatCols <- list("a","b","c","d","e","f")
## Do it 3x as many times
ConcatCols <- c(ConcatCols,ConcatCols,ConcatCols)

## Using stringi::stri_c ---------------------------------------------------
stri_joinStatement <- stri_c('stri_join(',stri_c(ConcatCols,collapse = ","),', sep="", collapse=NULL, ignore_null=TRUE)')
DT[, State := eval(parse(text = stri_joinStatement))]

## Using sprintf -----------------------------------------------------------
sprintfStatement <- stri_c("sprintf('",stri_flatten(rep("%i",length(ConcatCols))),"', ",stri_c(ConcatCols,collapse = ","),")")
DT[,State_sprintf_i := eval(parse(text = sprintfStatement))]

The generated statements are as follows:

> cat(stri_joinStatement)
stri_join(a,b,c,d,e,f,a,b,c,d,e,f,a,b,c,d,e,f, sep="", collapse=NULL, ignore_null=TRUE)
> cat(sprintfStatement)
sprintf('%i%i%i%i%i%i%i%i%i%i%i%i%i%i%i%i%i%i', a,b,c,d,e,f,a,b,c,d,e,f,a,b,c,d,e,f)

sprintf


Update 3: R does not have to be slow.

Based off the answer by @Martin Modrák, I put together a one-trick pony package based on some data.table internals specialized for the specialized "single digit integer" case: fastConcat. (Don't look for it on CRAN any time soon, but you can use it at your own risk by installing from github repo, msummersgill/fastConcat.)

This could probably be improved much further by someone who understands c better, but for now, it's running the same case as in Update 2 in 2.5 seconds -- around 8x faster than sprintf() and 11.5x faster than the stringi::stri_c()method I was using originally.

To me, this highlights the huge opportunity for performance improvements on some of the simplest operations in R like rudimentary string-vector concatenation with better tuned c. I guess people like @Matt Dowle have seen this for years-- if only he had the time to re-write all of R, not just the data.frame.

fastConcat


  • 2
    All stri_c does is immediately all a C++ function to concatenate the strings. I don't think you'll be able to beat its performance in R. Even paste goes very quickly to compiled code, hence its performance being almost as good. – Gregor Jan 12 '18 at 20:34
  • 2
    Maybe it would work for you to pre- or post-process your data using command line tools? Or concat the data in SQL or Hadoop or however you're loading it? – Gregor Jan 12 '18 at 20:36
  • 2
    Several thoughts: (a) combine the columns as you pull from Hadoop. Hive, Pig, and Spark all support column concatenation (to the best of my knowledge). (b) unfortunately fread won't allow a blank separator, but readr::write_delim will. It's probably too slow, but worth a try. (c) sed is probably the fastest you can do from the command line, but the answers to this question suggest that you can get some speed-up with different syntax and especially if you copy the file instead of editing it in place. – Gregor Jan 12 '18 at 21:20
  • 3
    (d) Don't know if this would work, but it looks like a single line of input checking in fwrite keeps you from specifying "" as the separator. You could try using fixInNamespace to remove that line and see if it will then allow you to fwrite with sep = "". I've never used fixInNamespace before but that should be do-able. The open question is whether there are deeper reasons for sep to not be an empty string. – Gregor Jan 12 '18 at 21:32
  • 1
    Submit an FR to support sep = "" imo. – eddi Jan 18 '18 at 16:35
12
+50

C to the rescue!

Stealing some code from data.table we can write a C function that works way faster (and could be parallelized to be even faster).

First make sure you have a working C++ toolchain with:

library(inline)

fx <- inline::cfunction( signature(x = "integer", y = "numeric" ) , '
    return ScalarReal( INTEGER(x)[0] * REAL(y)[0] ) ;
' )
fx( 2L, 5 ) #Should return 10

Then this should work (assuming integer-only data, but the code can be extended to other types):

library(inline)
library(data.table)
library(stringi)

header <- "

//Taken from https://github.com/Rdatatable/data.table/blob/master/src/fwrite.c
static inline void reverse(char *upp, char *low)
{
  upp--;
  while (upp>low) {
  char tmp = *upp;
  *upp = *low;
  *low = tmp;
  upp--;
  low++;
  }
}

void writeInt32(int *col, size_t row, char **pch)
{
  char *ch = *pch;
  int x = col[row];
  if (x == INT_MIN) {
  *ch++ = 'N';
  *ch++ = 'A';
  } else {
  if (x<0) { *ch++ = '-'; x=-x; }
  // Avoid log() for speed. Write backwards then reverse when we know how long.
  char *low = ch;
  do { *ch++ = '0'+x%10; x/=10; } while (x>0);
  reverse(ch, low);
  }
  *pch = ch;
}

//end of copied code 

"



 worker_fun <- inline::cfunction( signature(x = "list", preallocated_target = "character", columns = "integer", start_row = "integer", end_row = "integer"), includes = header , "
  const size_t _start_row = INTEGER(start_row)[0] - 1;
  const size_t _end_row = INTEGER(end_row)[0];

  const int max_out_len = 256 * 256; //max length of the final string
  char buffer[max_out_len];
  const size_t num_elements = _end_row - _start_row;
  const size_t num_columns = LENGTH(columns);
  const int * _columns = INTEGER(columns);

  for(size_t i = _start_row; i < _end_row; ++i) {
    char *buf_pos = buffer;
    for(size_t c = 0; c < num_columns; ++c) {
      if(c > 0) {
        buf_pos[0] = ',';
        ++buf_pos;
      }
      writeInt32(INTEGER(VECTOR_ELT(x, _columns[c] - 1)), i, &buf_pos);
    }
    SET_STRING_ELT(preallocated_target,i, mkCharLen(buffer, buf_pos - buffer));
  }
return preallocated_target;
" )

#Test with the same data

RowCount <- 5e6
DT <- data.table(x = "foo",
                 y = "bar",
                 a = sample.int(9, RowCount, TRUE),
                 b = sample.int(9, RowCount, TRUE),
                 c = sample.int(9, RowCount, TRUE),
                 d = sample.int(9, RowCount, TRUE),
                 e = sample.int(9, RowCount, TRUE),
                 f = sample.int(9, RowCount, TRUE))

## Generate an expression to paste an arbitrary list of columns together
ConcatCols <- list("a","b","c","d","e","f")
## Do it 3x as many times
ConcatCols <- c(ConcatCols,ConcatCols,ConcatCols)


ptm <- proc.time()
preallocated_target <- character(RowCount)
column_indices <- sapply(ConcatCols, FUN = function(x) { which(colnames(DT) == x )})
x <- worker_fun(DT, preallocated_target, column_indices, as.integer(1), as.integer(RowCount))
DT[, State := preallocated_target]
proc.time() - ptm

While your (integer only) example runs in about 20s on my PC, this runs in ~5s and can be easily parallelized.

Some things to note:

  • The code is not production ready - a lot of sanity checks should be made on the function inputs (especially checking if all columns are the same length, checking column types, preallocated_target size etc.)
  • The function puts its output into a preallocated character vector, this is non-standard and ugly (R usually does not have pass-by-reference semantics) but allows for parallelization (see below).
  • The last two parameters are start and end rows to be processed, once again, this is for paralellization
  • The function accepts column indices not column names. All columns have to be of type integer.
  • Except for the input data.table and preallocated_target the inputs have to be integers
  • Compilation time for the function is not included (as you should compile it beforehand - maybe even make a package)

Parallelization

EDIT: The approach below would actually fail due to the way clusterExport and R string storage work. Paralellization thus probably needs to be done in C as well, similarly to the way it is achieved in data.table.

Since you cannot pass inline-compiled functions across R processes, paralellization requires some more work. To be able to use the above function in parallel, you either need to compile it separately with R compiler and use dyn.load OR wrap it in a package OR use a forking backend for parallel (I don't have one, forking works only on UNIX).

Running in parallel would then look something like (not tested):

no_cores <- detectCores()

# Initiate cluster
cl <- makeCluster(no_cores)

#Preallocated target and prepare params
num_elements <- length(DT[[1]])
preallocated_target <- character(num_elements)
block_size <- 4096 #No of rows processed at once. Adjust for best performance
column_indices <- sapply(ConcatCols, FUN = function(x) { which(colnames(DT) == x )})

num_blocks <- ceiling(num_elements / block_size)

clusterExport(cl, 
   c("DT","preallocated_target","column_indices","num_elements", "block_size"))
clusterEvalQ(cl, <CODE TO LOAD THE NATIVE FUNCTION HERE>)

parLapply(cl, 1:num_blocks ,
          function(block_id)
          {
            throw_away <- 
              worker_fun(DT, preallocated_target, columns, 
              (block_id - 1) * block_size + 1, min(num_elements, block_id * block_size - 1))
            return(NULL)
          })



stopCluster(cl)
  • Thanks for all the effort I can see you put in! Running your code as-is I'm getting a run-time of 8.5 seconds, a 2.4x speed up from a baseline 20.5 seconds using sprintf(). I'm currently trying to work though line-by-line to try and understand what each piece is doing, but it seems like there is some really solid potential here! I may try to throw this into a one function package so that it can be pre-compiled to use OpenMP and allow non-integer, variable length inputs. If I can get that running then I think we may have a winner! – Matt Summersgill Jan 18 '18 at 17:28
  • Not sure how far you were planning on going down this rabbit hole, but I wound up put these into a package at on github at msummersgill/fastConcat . Currently just trying to get the same code to compile into an R function, I'm guessing the inline package is abstracting away some things I'm missing to get it up and running as stand-alone C/C++. – Matt Summersgill Jan 18 '18 at 23:17
  • 3
    Honestly that was my first experience writing C code for R, so I also don't really know what is necessary to get that C code work in package :-) Had fun though. Note that inline can give you the full source code (it shows it whenever there is a compile-time error). I believe the OpenMP stuff and the writeXX functions for other column types can be easily taken from fwrite.c in data.table with little modification to make that actually work. – Martin Modrák Jan 19 '18 at 8:22
  • Thanks for the inline hint! I re-started from the output of inline::code(worker_fun) and the package actually runs! Starting to tweak it now, I added in a if-else to skip the separator portion if the user specifies sep = "" (my integer use case), and it's now down to 3.1 seconds, a 6.6x speed up from the sprintf()baseline! – Matt Summersgill Jan 19 '18 at 13:42
8

I don't know how representative the sample data is for your actual data, but in the case of your sampled data you can achieve a substantial performance improvement by only concatenating each unique combination of ConcatCols once instead of multiple times.

That means for the sample data, you'd be looking at ~500k concatenations vs 10 million if you do all the duplicates too.

See the following code and timing example:

system.time({
  setkeyv(DT, ConcatCols)
  DTunique <- unique(DT[, ConcatCols, with=FALSE], by = key(DT))
  DTunique[, State :=  do.call(paste, c(DTunique, sep = ""))]
  DT[DTunique, State := i.State, on = ConcatCols]
})
#       user      system     elapsed 
#      7.448       0.462       4.618 

About half the time is spent on the setkey part. In case your data is already keyed, the time is cut down further to just a bit more than 2 seconds.

setkeyv(DT, ConcatCols)
system.time({
  DTunique <- unique(DT[, ConcatCols, with=FALSE], by = key(DT))
  DTunique[, State :=  do.call(paste, c(DTunique, sep = ""))]
  DT[DTunique, State := i.State, on = ConcatCols]
})
#       user      system     elapsed 
#      2.526       0.280       2.181 
  • 2
    This is also a great answer! My actual data typically only has about 10,000 unique combinations (whether I'm processing 1 million or 100 million) so this is a very efficient method for my application. Using a more representative data-set, (10 million rows, 18 columns, 9216 unique combinations), this method executes in 5.2 seconds, just slightly slower than the 3.4 second run-time for the bespoke function fastConcat::concat() in msummersgill/fastConcat based on the answer by @Martin Modrák . – Matt Summersgill Jan 19 '18 at 14:44
  • 1
    If your maximum number of unique combinations is constrained at 10k as you say, I suspect that my approach will scale better than the other answer, for example at 100 million rows. But I haven’t tested it – docendo discimus Jan 23 '18 at 9:06
  • Very smart trick! And you could probably combine both approaches to move even further. – Martin Modrák Jan 23 '18 at 11:27
  • @MartinModrák, thanks! Yes, of course a combination of both should be blazing fast. I like your answer too but due to my limited understanding of C code I mostly prefer to keep it simple and just use data.table. – docendo discimus Jan 23 '18 at 12:11
  • Nice! I'd use your approach, but another data.tablish way: DT[, z := do.call(paste0, .BY), by=ConcatCols] (takes 3x more time) – Frank Jan 24 '18 at 18:14
0

This uses unite from package tidyr. May not be the fastest, but it is probably faster than hand-coded R code.

library(tidyr)
system.time(
  DNew <- DT %>% unite(State, ConcatCols, sep = "", remove = FALSE)
)
# user  system elapsed 
# 14.974   0.183  15.343 

DNew[1:10]
# State   x   y a b c d e f
# 1: foo211621bar foo bar 2 1 1 6 2 1
# 2: foo532735bar foo bar 5 3 2 7 3 5
# 3: foo965776bar foo bar 9 6 5 7 7 6
# 4: foo221284bar foo bar 2 2 1 2 8 4
# 5: foo485976bar foo bar 4 8 5 9 7 6
# 6: foo566778bar foo bar 5 6 6 7 7 8
# 7: foo892636bar foo bar 8 9 2 6 3 6
# 8: foo836672bar foo bar 8 3 6 6 7 2
# 9: foo963926bar foo bar 9 6 3 9 2 6
# 10: foo385216bar foo bar 3 8 5 2 1 6
  • 3
    Not sure which benchmark you're running, but on the original with 10 million rows, tidyr::unite() took 25.7 seconds on my server compared to 23.6 seconds for base R paste(). This slightly slower execution makes perfect sense when you look at the source code on github, as it turns out unite is just a wrapper function written around base R paste(). The second example with the integer only concatenation does not produce the same result as the other methods benchmarked as the columns are not repeated. – Matt Summersgill Jan 22 '18 at 23:34

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