27

I have a csv string containing doubles (e.g "0.3,0.4,0.3"), and I want to be able to output a double array containing the cumulative sum of these numbers (e.g [0.3,0.7,1.0]).

So far, I have

double[] probabilities = textBox_f.Text.Split(new char[]{','}).Select(s => double.Parse(s)).ToArray();

which gives the numbers as an array, but not the cumulative sum of the numbers.

Is there any way to continue this expression to get what I want, or do I need to use iteration to create a new array from the array I already have?

6
  • 2
    I like to learn new technologies and ways of doing things. It's perfectly possible other ways are better or quicker, but this is something I don't know how to do, and so would like to Commented Jan 28, 2011 at 0:26
  • And why? If a solution without LINQ is both quicker to type and faster to execute, why should you be interested in the LINQ solution? And why LINQ specifically, anyway — why not ask about a solution that uses generics, or dynamic, or any other random feature that it unnecessary to answer the question?
    – Timwi
    Commented Jan 28, 2011 at 0:34
  • Split(new char[]{','}) may equivalently be written Split(',') since the parameter is declared with params. Commented Jan 28, 2011 at 20:02
  • 3
    Old question, but I have to comment. The question is about how you do this in LINQ, not how you do it without LINQ. Commented Jun 12, 2012 at 8:53
  • 2
    @simonalexander2005 I applaud you for asking the question but I must wonder why you selected the answer by Blindy that (currently) has -3 points? It's definitely not a good answer. Personally I liked Eric Lippert's or Andrey's answers better. Just wondering your take on this question almost 5 years later.
    – Kristopher
    Commented Oct 23, 2015 at 13:50

12 Answers 12

59

There's a time for generality, and there's a time for solving the problem actually posed. This is one of the latter times. If you want to make a method that turns a sequence of doubles into a sequence of partial sums, then just do that:

public static IEnumerable<double> CumulativeSum(this IEnumerable<double> sequence)
{
    double sum = 0;
    foreach(var item in sequence)
    {
        sum += item;
        yield return sum;
    }        
}

Easy. No messing around with aggregates and complicated queries and whatnot. Easy to understand, easy to debug, easy to use:

textBox_f.Text
    .Split(new char[]{','})
    .Select(s => double.Parse(s))
    .CumulativeSum()
    .ToArray();

Now, I note that if that is user input then double.Parse can throw an exception; it might be a better idea to do something like:

public static double? MyParseDouble(this string s)
{
    double d;
    if (double.TryParse(s, out d))
        return d;
    return null;
}

public static IEnumerable<double?> CumulativeSum(this IEnumerable<double?> sequence)
{
    double? sum = 0;
    foreach(var item in sequence)
    {
        sum += item;
        yield return sum;
    }        
}
...
textBox_f.Text
    .Split(new char[]{','})
    .Select(s => s.MyParseDouble())
    .CumulativeSum()
    .ToArray();

and now you don't get an exception if the user makes a typing mistake; you get nulls.

6
  • I tried simulating the partial sum of an array of double? with the following code double? sum = 0; sum += 1; sum += null; Console.WriteLine($"sum = {sum}.");. The sum becomes null rather than 1. What is wrong? Commented Mar 23, 2020 at 18:53
  • 2
    @MoneyOrientedProgrammer: Nothing is wrong; that's correct. null double means "I don't know what the value is". What is zero plus one plus something you don't know? Commented Mar 23, 2020 at 18:57
  • 2
    @MoneyOrientedProgrammer: If your intention is "nulls are zero" then use x??0 where x is nullable. Commented Mar 23, 2020 at 19:01
  • OK. Your code above does not need to be written as sum += item??0 ? Commented Mar 23, 2020 at 19:19
  • @MoneyOrientedProgrammer: That depends on the business logic. Personally, I'd rather not have malformed data be ignored with no warning.
    – Brian
    Commented Mar 23, 2020 at 19:20
26

I had a similar requirement some time ago. Basically, I needed to do an aggregation, but I also needed to select each intermediate value. So I wrote an extension method named SelectAggregate (probably not the most appropriate name, but I couldn't find anything better then) that can be used like that:

double[] numbers = new [] { 0.3, 0.4, 0.3 };
double[] cumulativeSums = numbers.SelectAggregate(0.0, (acc, x) => acc + x).ToArray();

Here's the code :

    public static IEnumerable<TAccumulate> SelectAggregate<TSource, TAccumulate>(
        this IEnumerable<TSource> source,
        TAccumulate seed,
        Func<TAccumulate, TSource, TAccumulate> func)
    {
        source.CheckArgumentNull("source");
        func.CheckArgumentNull("func");
        return source.SelectAggregateIterator(seed, func);
    }

    private static IEnumerable<TAccumulate> SelectAggregateIterator<TSource, TAccumulate>(
        this IEnumerable<TSource> source,
        TAccumulate seed,
        Func<TAccumulate, TSource, TAccumulate> func)
    {
        TAccumulate previous = seed;
        foreach (var item in source)
        {
            TAccumulate result = func(previous, item);
            previous = result;
            yield return result;
        }
    }
1
  • 1
    +1 — good solution that also teaches how to write reusable code!
    – Timwi
    Commented Jan 28, 2011 at 0:39
6

You want to use the Aggregate operator, with a List<double> as the aggregation accumulator. That way you can produce a projection which is itself a sequence of sums.

Here's an example to get you started:

double[] runningTotal = textBox_f.Text
            .Split(new char[]{','})
            .Select(s => double.Parse(s))
            .Aggregate((IEnumerable<double>)new List<double>(), 
                       (a,i) => a.Concat(new[]{a.LastOrDefault() + i}))
            .ToArray();
3
  • 1
    this is inefficient, it will calculate Sum every time making it O(n^2)
    – Andrey
    Commented Jan 28, 2011 at 0:34
  • Great answer, and got me looking at aggregates - but in the end I chose another one to use. Thanks though Commented Jan 28, 2011 at 0:36
  • @Andrey - My original implementation was incorrect, actually. I meant to use LastOrDefault() ... since the last item in the running total is already the cumulative sum of all the items before it. The only inneficiency remaining is the creation of intermediate sequences ... which for most use cases should be minimal. The implementation now compiles and produces the expected result.
    – LBushkin
    Commented Jan 28, 2011 at 0:46
4
var input=new double[]{ ... }
double sum=0;

var output=input
    .Select(w=>sum+=w);
14
  • 14
    Using LINQ queries just for their side-effects is a bad idea for a number of reasons - not least of which is the fact that future readers of the code won't expect this ... it violates the principle of least surprise.
    – LBushkin
    Commented Jan 28, 2011 at 0:35
  • 10
    This is a really, really bad idea. LBushkin is right. Please do not write queries that have side effects. Queries should query data, not modify it. Commented Jan 28, 2011 at 6:32
  • 7
    @Blindy: Can you explain how Select differs from map? (And how is mutation of a variable as a side effect of a query comprehension "functional"?) Commented Jan 28, 2011 at 15:16
  • 5
    As a specific example of why this is such a bad idea, the fact that var l1 = output.ToList(); var l2 = output.ToList(); results in lists with different contents is likely to be very surprising.
    – kvb
    Commented Jan 28, 2011 at 15:48
  • 14
    @Blindy: and I would expect a Haskell programmer to be utterly horrified by what you've done. Haskell is all about avoiding side effects and mutations like this. Commented Jan 28, 2011 at 18:38
2

Why does it need to be LINQ?

var cumulative = new double[probabilities.Length];
for (int i = 0; i < probabilities.Length; i++)
    cumulative[i] = probabilities[i] + (i == 0 ? 0 : cumulative[i-1]);
1
  • Perhaps for the same reason it has to be the cumulative sum, an array of numbers and C#? Commented Jun 12, 2012 at 9:17
2

First of all i don't think that it is good task for Linq. Plain old foreach will do it better. But as a puzzle it is fine.

First idea was to use subqueries, but i don't like it, because it is O(n^2). Here is my linear solution:

        double[] probabilities = new double[] { 0.3, 0.4, 0.3};
        probabilities
            .Aggregate(
                new {sum=Enumerable.Empty<double>(), last = 0.0d},
                (a, c) => new {
                    sum = a.sum.Concat(Enumerable.Repeat(a.last+c,1)),
                    last = a.last + c
                },
                a => a.sum
            );
6
  • 3
    I know it is seven years later, but I didn't see this solution until just now. Though this solution is linear in time, it is also linear in its usage of stack space, and that's really bad; a relatively small input array will cause the stack to overflow. Do you see why it is linear in stack space? Hint: the overflow is in the code that you didn't write. Write that code and see what happens! Commented Sep 25, 2018 at 17:46
  • @EricLippert that is an interesting remark. I am not sure what could cause linear stack space allocation. Does Concat effectively yields the sequence by storing it in the stack? github.com/Microsoft/referencesource/blob/master/System.Core/…
    – Andrey
    Commented Sep 25, 2018 at 20:31
  • 2
    Here's a little program. Before you run it, try to predict what the output will be. Then try it; were you surprised? dotnetfiddle.net/9akiA5 It should now be clear where the stack is consumed. Commented Sep 25, 2018 at 20:51
  • 2
    Just to clarify your comment: the problem is when you have a large number of concatenations. Concatenating two sequences together is fine. The problem arises when you concatenate one item onto a sequence, and then concatenate one item onto that sequence, and then concatenate one item onto that sequence, and then concatenate one item onto that sequence, … and you see how that goes. We build a chain of objects on the heap which when iterated over each triggers a method call, and the call goes on the stack. Commented Sep 26, 2018 at 13:41
  • 1
    The net result is: if the sequence is big, you overflow the stack. But even if it is small, think about the cost! Iterating the first item in an n-item list costs you 1 method call. Iterating the second costs you 2, iterating the third costs you 3, and so the total cost is quadratic. So it looks like you have a linear algorithm here, but in fact it is quadratic when you consider the code you didn't write: the foreach. Commented Sep 26, 2018 at 13:43
1

use RX :

var input=new double[]{ ... }
var output = new List<double>();
input.ToObservable().Scan((e, f) => f + e).Subscribe(output.Add);
1
  • 1
    While a nice bit of code, it does require an extra import Commented Feb 25, 2016 at 12:18
1

This is actually pretty straightforward to generalize using generator. Here is a new extension method called Accumulate that works like a combination of Select and Aggregate. It returns a new sequence by applying a binary function to each element in the sequence and accumulated value so far.

 public static class EnumerableHelpers 
 {
    public static IEnumerable<U> Accumulate<T, U>(this IEnumerable<T> self, U init, Func<U, T, U> f) 
    {
        foreach (var x in self)
            yield return init = f(init, x);
    }

    public static IEnumerable<T> Accumulate<T>(this IEnumerable<T> self, Func<T, T, T> f)
    {
        return self.Accumulate(default(T), f);
    }

    public static IEnumerable<double> PartialSums(this IEnumerable<double> self)
    {
        return self.Accumulate((x, y) => x + y);
    }

    public static IEnumerable<int> PartialSums(this IEnumerable<int> self)
    {
        return self.Accumulate((x, y) => x + y);
    }
 }
1

Here's my solution:

  • Linq
  • linear time
  • linear memory
  • no side effects

Only caveat is that it doesn't work for empty lists (trivial to handle).

    var doublesSummed  = doubles.Skip(1).Aggregate(
        new {
            sum = doubles.First(),
            doubles = new [] {doubles.First()}.AsEnumerable()
        },  
        (acc, nextDouble) => new {
            sum = acc.sum + nextDouble,
            doubles = acc.doubles.Append(acc.sum + nextDouble)
        }
    );

Demo

0

Here's a way of doing it using LINQ:

double[] doubles = { 1.7, 2.3, 1.9, 4.1, 2.9 };
var doublesSummed = new List<double>();

Enumerable.Aggregate(doubles, (runningSum, nextFactor) => {
    double currentSum = runningSum + nextFactor;
    doublesSummed.Add(currentSum);
    return currentSum;
});

doublesSummed.Dump();

In LINQPad:

  • 4
  • 5.9
  • 10
  • 12.9
0

Cumulative sum for List<double>:

var nums = new List<double>() { 0.3, 0.0, 0.4, 1.1 };
var cumsum = nums.Aggregate(new List<double> (), 
              (list, next) => { list.Add(list.LastOrDefault() + next); return list; });
0

Nice JavaScript trick taken from here: https://stackoverflow.com/a/55259065/7126740

Using currying to store the sum

Lambda:

Func<int, Func<int, int>> cumulative = sum => value => sum += value;
var sums = array.Select(cumulative(0));

Local function:

Func<int, int> cumulative(int sum) => value => sum += value;
var sums = array.Select(cumulative(0));

Single line:

var sums = array.Select(((Func<int, Func<int, int>>)(sum => value => sum += value))(0));

As a result, the compiler will generate a class to store the sum:

[CompilerGenerated]
private sealed class <>c__DisplayClass0_0
{
    public int sum;

    internal int <Main>b__1(int value)
    {
        return sum += value;
    }
}

I don't recommend using this code, but it's a miracle to me that this is even possible

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