18

I'm developing an app on Laravel 5.5 and I'm facing an issue with a specific query scope. I have the following table structure (some fields omitted):

orders
---------
id
parent_id
status

The parent_id column references the id from the same table. I have this query scope to filter records that don't have any children:

public function scopeNoChildren(Builder $query): Builder
{
    return $query->select('orders.*')
        ->leftJoin('orders AS children', function ($join) {
            $join->on('orders.id', '=', 'children.parent_id')
                ->where('children.status', self::STATUS_COMPLETED);
        })
        ->where('children.id', null);
}

This scope works fine when used alone. However, if I try to combine it with any another condition, it throws an SQL exception:

Order::where('status', Order::STATUS_COMPLETED)
    ->noChildren()
    ->get();

Leads to this:

SQLSTATE[23000]: Integrity constraint violation: 1052 Column 'status' in where clause is ambiguous

I found two ways to avoid that error:

Solution #1: Prefix all other conditions with the table name

Doing something like this works:

Order::where('orders.status', Order::STATUS_COMPLETED)
    ->noChildren()
    ->get();

But I don't think this is a good approach since it's not clear the table name is required in case other dev or even myself try to use that scope again in the future. They'll probably end up figuring that out, but it doesn't seem a good practice.

Solution #2: Use a subquery

I can keep the ambiguous columns apart in a subquery. Still, in this case and as the table grows, the performance will degrade.

This is the strategy I'm using, though. Because it doesn't require any change to other scopes and conditions. At least not in the way I'm applying it right now.

public function scopeNoChildren(Builder $query): Builder
{
    $subQueryChildren = self::select('id', 'parent_id')
        ->completed();
    $sqlChildren = DB::raw(sprintf(
        '(%s) AS children',
        $subQueryChildren->toSql()
    ));

    return $query->select('orders.*')
        ->leftJoin($sqlChildren, function ($join) use ($subQueryChildren) {
            $join->on('orders.id', '=', 'children.parent_id')
                ->addBinding($subQueryChildren->getBindings());
         })->where('children.id', null);
}

The perfect solution

I think that having the ability to use queries without prefixing with table name without relying on subqueries would be the perfect solution.

That's why I'm asking: Is there a way to have table name automatically added to Eloquent query methods?

  • I don't think, what you have in mind, is going to work. Consider - there isn't only select and where. There is also join, groupBy, orderBy. The system can just not know in any situation, if a column name needs to be prefixed. E.g. ->orderBy('distance'). How would you know if distance is a table name (and thus needs to be prefixed) or an alias of a calculated column? You would need at least to understand the semantic of the query. But that would not help in other situation, where the information is in the schema, but not in the query. – Paul Spiegel Jun 4 '18 at 14:56
  • This is impossible without using subquery, unless you change your structure. – Wahyu Kristianto Jun 9 '18 at 17:02
  • @WahyuKristianto Not sure what you meant, but if you think only about SQL, it's possible to have the query without a subquery as I demonstrated in the original code. The problem is on how the framework handles joining a table with itself. Anyway, I know didn't change my question on subquery performance but Jonas' answer proved to be good enough. – Gustavo Straube Jun 10 '18 at 13:09
  • @GustavoStraube is Laravel's local scope not good for you? – Wahyu Kristianto Jun 10 '18 at 13:29
12
+50

I would use a relationship:

public function children()
{
    return $this->hasMany(self::class, 'parent_id')
        ->where('status', self::STATUS_COMPLETED);
}

Order::where('status', Order::STATUS_COMPLETED)
    ->whereDoesntHave('children')
    ->get();

This executes the following query:

select *
from `orders`
where `status` = ?
  and not exists
    (select *
     from `orders` as `laravel_reserved_0`
     where `orders`.`id` = `laravel_reserved_0`.`parent_id`
       and `status` = ?)

It uses a subquery, but it's short, simple and doesn't cause any ambiguity problems.

I don't think that performance will be a relevant issue unless you have millions of rows (I assume you don't). If the subquery performance will be a problem in the future, you can still go back to a JOIN solution. Until then, I would focus on code readability and flexibility.

A way to reuse the relationship (as pointed out by the OP):

public function children()
{
    return $this->hasMany(self::class, 'parent_id');
}

Order::where('status', Order::STATUS_COMPLETED)
    ->whereDoesntHave('children', function ($query) {
        $query->where('status', self::STATUS_COMPLETED);
    })->get();

Or a way with two relationships:

public function completedChildren()
{
    return $this->children()
        ->where('status', self::STATUS_COMPLETED);
}

Order::where('status', Order::STATUS_COMPLETED)
    ->whereDoesntHave('completedChildren')
    ->get();
  • 1
    That (at least) looks elegant. Can you post the query that will be created/executed? – Paul Spiegel Jun 4 '18 at 15:03
  • I added the query. – Jonas Staudenmeir Jun 4 '18 at 15:13
  • 1
    Performance-wise, this subquery is just fine for the task. In my experience it's like 10 - 20% slower than a left join solution - Which is not worth a compex solutions. – Paul Spiegel Jun 4 '18 at 16:58
  • This is that kind of thing that makes me wonder: "How didn't I think of it before?!". It's a way to achieve Paul's answer through methods the framework offers out of the box. – Gustavo Straube Jun 4 '18 at 18:13
  • 2
    It worked like a charm. One note, though: instead of adding the where clause to the relation method, I did this Order::whereDoesntHave('children', function ($query) { $query->where('status', self::STATUS_COMPLETED) });. The result is the same, it just keeps the relation more flexible to be used in other situations. – Gustavo Straube Jun 4 '18 at 21:09
3

In MySQL there are two good ways to find the leaf nodes (rows) in an adjacency list. One is the LEFT-JOIN-WHERE-NULL method (antijoin), which is what you did. The other is a NOT EXISTS subquery. Both methods should have a comparable performance (in theory they do exactly the same). However the subquery solution will not introduce new columns to the result.

return $query->select('orders.*')
    ->whereRaw("not exists (
        select *
        from orders as children
        where children.parent_id = orders.id
          and children.status = ?
    )", [self::STATUS_COMPLETED]);
  • Hey Paul. Yea, that's an alternative for what I've done. However, it still relies on subqueries. What I'm looking for here is a way to achieve something like the solution #1 in my question but without the prefixes. I guess I'll probably have to end up doing something as Davit's answer proposes. – Gustavo Straube Jun 4 '18 at 12:56
  • @GustavoStraube "it still relies on subqueries" - Well.. does your religion forbids the use of subqueries? If not - What is the reason for avoiding them at any price? Touching the framework core is something that I would avoid. – Paul Spiegel Jun 4 '18 at 13:12
  • Definitely not. Subqueries are already in use and running well on production. However, the bounty here is related to how to achieve what I called the "perfect solution" in my question. Besides, extending the framework is not the same as touching the core. Disclaimer: I didn't test the other answer yet, so I'm not favoring it. Just trying to make it clear I'm also against changing the framework itself. – Gustavo Straube Jun 4 '18 at 13:28
2

You must create a SomeDatabaseBuilder extending the original Illuminate\Database\Query\Builder, and a SomeEloquentBuilder extending the Illuminate\Database\Eloquent\Builder and, finally, a BaseModel extending Illuminate\Database\Eloquent\Model and overwrite these methods:

/**
 * @return SomeDatabaseBuilder
 */
protected function newBaseQueryBuilder()
{
    $connection = $this->getConnection();

    return new SomeDatabaseBuilder(
        $connection, $connection->getQueryGrammar(), $connection->getPostProcessor()
    );
}

/**
 * @param \Illuminate\Database\Query\Builder $query
 * @return SameEloquentBulder
 */
public function newEloquentBuilder($query)
{
    return new SameEloquentBulder($query);
}

Then, on SomeDatabaseBuilder and SameEloquentBulder, change the methods to qualify columns by default (or make it optional).

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.