676

I am writing a very simple script that calls another script, and I need to propagate the parameters from my current script to the script I am executing.

For instance, my script name is foo.sh and calls bar.sh

foo.sh:

bar $1 $2 $3 $4

How can I do this without explicitly specifying each parameter?

1128

Use "$@" instead of plain $@ if you actually wish your parameters to be passed the same.

Observe:

$ cat foo.sh
#!/bin/bash
baz.sh $@

$ cat bar.sh
#!/bin/bash
baz.sh "$@"

$ cat baz.sh
#!/bin/bash
echo Received: $1
echo Received: $2
echo Received: $3
echo Received: $4

$ ./foo.sh first second
Received: first
Received: second
Received:
Received:

$ ./foo.sh "one quoted arg"
Received: one
Received: quoted
Received: arg
Received:

$ ./bar.sh first second
Received: first
Received: second
Received:
Received:

$ ./bar.sh "one quoted arg"
Received: one quoted arg
Received:
Received:
Received:
  • 4
    This does this work for pure pass through of quoted/escaped strings: Observe: cat rsync_foo.sh #!/bin/bash echo "$@" rsync "$@" ./rsync_foo.sh -n "bar me" bar2 bar me bar2skipping directory bar me Is it possible to have shell script that can see the true original command line complete with quotes or escaped strings? – Mark Edington Nov 24 '13 at 1:33
  • 2
    What about passing flags? Eg, './bar.sh --with-stuff' – Nathan Long Jan 31 '14 at 15:10
  • 4
    I suggest anyone who wants to understand the subject of Word Splitting better, to read more about it here. – Rany Albeg Wein Jan 21 '16 at 4:07
  • 3
    I suggest you show what happens when including an 'arg with spaces' for the three examples, too. I was surprised by the results; hopefully you can explain them. – Michael Scheper Jun 8 '17 at 22:54
  • @MichaelScheper, what's surprising? Quote parsing happens before parameter expansion, which happens before string splitting. Thus, literal quotes in the results of parameter expansions aren't honored as syntax. Whereas in the case of "$@" you're not performing string-splitting after expansion at all. Anyhow, we've already got Q&A entries explaining all of this in detail; BashFAQ #50 is a good related read. – Charles Duffy Sep 13 '17 at 19:40
457

For bash and other Bourne-like shells:

java com.myserver.Program "$@"
  • 12
    @Amir: No, not for csh. For everyone’s sanity: do not script csh. But I think maybe $argv:q will work in some csh variants. – Chris Johnsen Jul 6 '10 at 23:27
  • 2
    Thanks! As desired, this passes the same set of arguments received by the script -- not one big argument. The double-quotes are necessary. Works even if with quoted arguments that include spaces. – Andy Thomas Jan 11 '12 at 16:09
  • 21
    Related: if your shell script is just acting as a wrapper to run java, consider making the last line exec java com.myserver.Program "$@" This causes bash to exec into java, rather than wait around for it to complete. So, you are using one less process slot. Also, if the parent process (which ran your script) is watching it via the pid, and expecting it to be the 'java' process, some unusual things could break if you don't do an exec; the exec causes java to inherit the same pid. – greggo Nov 7 '14 at 23:19
  • 5
    @dragonxlwang: You could use an array variable, if your shell supports them (e.g. bash, zsh, others, but not plain Bourne- or POSIX-shell): save to args with args=("$@") and expand each element as a separate shell “word” (akin to "$@") with "${args[@]}". – Chris Johnsen Nov 18 '15 at 7:39
  • 1
    Are there any "gotchas" to keep in mind when using "$@", like will it fail if you have escaped spaces in an argument, or null characters, or other special characters? – IQAndreas Apr 3 '16 at 8:06
78

Use "$@" (works for all POSIX compatibles).

[...] , bash features the "$@" variable, which expands to all command-line parameters separated by spaces.

From Bash by example.

  • 4
    So is "$@" not just quotes around $@ but in effect a different built in variable? – ben Feb 4 '15 at 14:33
  • 3
    @ben It is a single variable but it requires the double quotes around it to have a useful value distinct from the (broken) $*. I believe there is historical progression here; $* did not work as designed, so $@ was invented to replace it; but the quoting rules being what they are, the double quotes around it are still required (or it will revert to the broken $* semantics). – tripleee Dec 15 '15 at 9:00
  • 2
    "So is "$@" not just quotes around $@ but in effect a different built in variable?" -- For all intents and purposes, yes: stackoverflow.com/a/28099707/162094 – Stuart Berg Jan 12 '16 at 19:32
  • If you call a script containing echo "$@" as ./script.sh a "b c" d then you just get a b c d instead of a "b c" d, which is very much different. – isarandi May 16 '18 at 9:25
  • 4
    @isarandi While it's true that the output no longer contains the quotes, that's what you would expect... but rest assured that within the script, echo receives three arguments: "a" "b c" "d" (then the shell joins them together as part of its string expansion). But if you'd used for i in "$@"; do echo $i; done You'd have gotten a⏎b c⏎d. – FeRD Jul 12 '18 at 7:29
29
#!/usr/bin/env bash
while [ "$1" != "" ]; do
  echo "Received: ${1}" && shift;
done;

Just thought this may be a bit more useful when trying to test how args come into your script

  • 4
    this definitely did not help answer his question but this is indeed useful. upvoted! – Dario Russo Mar 5 '15 at 17:28
  • 1
    It breaks when an empty parameter is passed. You should check for $# – Sebi Mar 6 '17 at 16:04
  • 1
    This doesn't solve OP's question. – codeforester Jun 5 '18 at 17:53
26

I realize this has been well answered but here's a comparison between "$@" $@ "$*" and $*

Contents of test script:

# cat ./test.sh
#!/usr/bin/env bash
echo "================================="

echo "Quoted DOLLAR-AT"
for ARG in "$@"; do
    echo $ARG
done

echo "================================="

echo "NOT Quoted DOLLAR-AT"
for ARG in $@; do
    echo $ARG
done

echo "================================="

echo "Quoted DOLLAR-STAR"
for ARG in "$*"; do
    echo $ARG
done

echo "================================="

echo "NOT Quoted DOLLAR-STAR"
for ARG in $*; do
    echo $ARG
done

echo "================================="

Now, run the test script with various arguments:

# ./test.sh  "arg with space one" "arg2" arg3
=================================
Quoted DOLLAR-AT
arg with space one
arg2
arg3
=================================
NOT Quoted DOLLAR-AT
arg
with
space
one
arg2
arg3
=================================
Quoted DOLLAR-STAR
arg with space one arg2 arg3
=================================
NOT Quoted DOLLAR-STAR
arg
with
space
one
arg2
arg3
=================================
7

My SUN Unix has a lot of limitations, even "$@" was not interpreted as desired. My workaround is ${@}. For example,

#!/bin/ksh
find ./ -type f | xargs grep "${@}"

By the way, I had to have this particular script because my Unix also does not support grep -r

2

Works fine, except if you have spaces or escaped characters. I don't find the way to capture arguments in this case and send to a ssh inside of script.

This could be useful but is so ugly

_command_opts=$( echo "$@" | awk -F\- 'BEGIN { OFS=" -" } { for (i=2;i<=NF;i++) { gsub(/^[a-z] /,"&@",$i) ; gsub(/ $/,"",$i );gsub (/$/,"@",$i) }; print $0 }' | tr '@' \' )
2

If you include $@ in a quoted string with other characters the behavior is very odd when there are multiple arguments, only the first argument is included inside the quotes.

Example:

#!/bin/bash
set -x
bash -c "true foo $@"

Yields:

$ bash test.sh bar baz
+ bash -c 'true foo bar' baz

But assigning to a different variable first:

#!/bin/bash
set -x
args="$@"
bash -c "true foo $args"

Yields:

$ bash test.sh bar baz
+ args='bar baz'
+ bash -c 'true foo bar baz'
  • 1
    I won't deny that's disconcerting, but it actually makes sense within the semantics of "$@" in bash. It also helps illustrate the key difference between $@ and $*, and why they're both useful. From the bash(1) man page Special Parameters section: "* — When the expansion occurs within double quotes, it expands to a single word with the value of each parameter […] That is, "$*" is equivalent to "$1c$2c...", where c is [$IFS]." And indeed, using $* instead of $@ in your first example would've netted output identical to the second version. – FeRD Jul 4 '18 at 11:23
  • Now, compare that to "$@". Again from the man page: "@ — When the expansion occurs within double quotes, each parameter expands to a separate word. That is, "$@" is equivalent to "$1" "$2" … If the double-quoted expansion occurs within a word, the expansion of the first parameter is joined with the beginning part of the original word, and the expansion of the last parameter is joined with the last part of the original word." ...And indeed, if your code had been bash -c "true foo $@ bar baz", then running it as test.sh one two would net bash -c 'true foo one' 'two bar baz'. – FeRD Jul 4 '18 at 11:25
  • 1
    Thanks for the docs citation and info about $*, I seem to forget that it exists.. – ColinM Jul 11 '18 at 23:09
  • Heh. I'm the opposite, $@ was just gaining traction when I first started shell scripting, I still have to remind myself it's there. It was common to see "$*" used in scripts... then the author would realize it was smashing all of their arguments together, so they'd try all manner of complex nonsense with word-splitting "$*", or [re]assembling an arg list by looping over shift to pull them down one by one... just using $@ solves it. (Helps that bash uses the same mnemonic to access array members, too: ${var[*]} for them all as a word, ${var[@]} for a list of words.) – FeRD Jul 12 '18 at 7:17

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