I'm testing a function that presents a UIAlertController, but the test keeps failing. This is what the function looks like:

func presentBuyingErrorDiaologue() {
    let alert = UIAlertController(title: "Warning", message: "Error purchasing item, please retry this action. If that doesn't help, try restarting or reinstalling the app.", preferredStyle: .alert)
    let okButton = UIAlertAction(title: "OK", style: .default)
    alert.addAction(okButton)
    self.present(alert, animated: true, completion: nil)
}

Since this function is in a class called ShopViewController, I'm assuming that the correct way to test this would be to call the function shopViewController.presentBuyingErrorDiaologue() then use XCTAssertTrue(shopViewController.presentedViewController is UIAlertController). However, the assert statement fails when I run the test. What would be the correct way to test that the UIAlertController is the presented view?

  • inside your test, try to print(UIApplication.shared.keyWindow?.rootViewController), what does it say? – Andrea Mugnaini Jan 14 at 5:29
  • This is what I get when I print: Optional(<UINavigationController: 0x7f866985c400>) – Erika Jan 14 at 5:54
  • does my answer below help you out ? – Andrea Mugnaini Jan 14 at 5:56
  • Yes thank you so much for your help so far! But I had to change self.present to UIApplication.shared.keyWindow?.rootViewController?.present, is there a way that I can test the UIController without changing self.present? – Erika Jan 14 at 5:58
  • Yes sure, since I don't have your code, I included presentBuyingErrorDialogue directly inside the test. In your test case you should make sure your ShopViewController is visible and then, from the unit test (eg testPresentBuyingErrorDialogue) call the proper presentBuyingErrorDialogue with the XCTestExpectation mechanism. – Andrea Mugnaini Jan 14 at 6:01

You should wait that UIAlertController is fully presented before testing its visibility, so you might try to change your test following this way:

import XCTest

class UIAlertControllerTests: XCTestCase {

    func presentBuyingErrorDialogue() {
      let alert = UIAlertController(title: "Warning", message: "Error purchasing item, please retry this action. If that doesn't help, try restarting or reinstalling the app.", preferredStyle: .alert)
      let okButton = UIAlertAction(title: "OK", style: .default)
      alert.addAction(okButton)
      UIApplication.shared.keyWindow?.rootViewController?.present(alert, animated: true, completion: nil)
    }

    func testPresentBuyingErrorDialogue() {
      self.presentBuyingErrorDialogue()
      let expectation = XCTestExpectation(description: "testExample")
      DispatchQueue.main.asyncAfter(deadline: .now() + 1.0, execute: {
        XCTAssertTrue(UIApplication.shared.keyWindow?.rootViewController?.presentedViewController is UIAlertController)
        expectation.fulfill()
      })
      wait(for: [expectation], timeout: 1.5)
   }
}

You may change UIApplication.shared.keyWindow?.rootViewController with your ShopViewController.

You can use the completion parameter of the present method to get a callback when the alert is presented, and thus find out whether the alert is shown. (Note that this approach is more about asserting the correct action was performed, not the correct view controller type was shown).

For this to work, you'll have to add a completion parameter to your presentBuyingErrorDialogue method, but you can give it a default value of nil so that it won't bother you in your non-test code. (Of course you can also use it in you app code when it makes sense, e.g. to start a background animation when the alert appears).

Here's the modified code for the view controller:

class ShopViewController: UIViewController {
  func presentBuyingErrorDialogue(completion: (() -> ())? = nil) {
    let alert = UIAlertController(title: "Warning", message: "...", preferredStyle: .alert)
    let okButton = UIAlertAction(title: "OK", style: .default)
    alert.addAction(okButton)
    self.present(alert, animated: true, completion: completion)
  }
}

This is what a simple test might look like (disregarding any cleanup of the rootViewController):

class ShopViewControllerTests: XCTestCase {
  func testErrorAlert() {
    let vc = ShopViewController()
    UIApplication.shared.keyWindow?.rootViewController = vc
    let exp = expectation(description: "shows alert")
    vc.presentBuyingErrorDialogue {
      exp.fulfill()
    }
    waitForExpectations(timeout: 1)
  }
}

In the app code, you still can use the method as before, without having to provide that callback block:

let vc = ShopViewController()
vc.presentBuyingErrorDialogue()
  1. Add MockUIAlertController to your test target
  2. Set up a bridging header for your test target
  3. Add #import <MockUIAlertController/QCOMockAlertVerifier.h> to that bridging header
  4. Instantiate a QCOMockAlertVerifier before your test calls shopViewController.presentBuyingErrorDiaologue()
  5. Verify various values captured by the QCOMockAlertVerifier

In addition to capturing values, QCOMockAlertVerifier lets you easily execute the action for an alert button with a given title.

The tests don't require any waiting for expectations, so they are super-fast.

Learn more at How to Test UIAlertControllers (and Control Swizzling).

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