0

since I don't feel super comfortable with protected, private inheritance in C++ I googled it up and came up with this stackoverflow answer: Difference between private, public, and protected inheritance . Nice! I thought, let us try this out. So I wrote a small example program to test this and wrote the exptected output as comment.

 class Person{
   public: virtual void publicInterface() {}
   protected: virtual void protectedInterface() {}
   private: virtual void privateInterface() {}
    };

    class Professor : public Person  {};
    class Teacher : protected Person { 
    public: void teachPublic(){publicInterface();}
    public: void teachProtected(){protectedInterface();}
    public: void teachPrivate(){privateInterface();}        // not compiling
    };
    class Student : private Person {
    public: void learnPublic(){publicInterface();}
    public: void learnProtected(){protectedInterface();} 
    public: void learnPrivate(){privateInterface();}        // not compiling
    };
    int main()
    {
        Person* p = new Person();       // ok is-a
    Person* pro = new Professor();  // ok    is-a
        Person* t = new Teacher();      // not compiling! No is-a relat.
        Person* s = new Student();      // not compiling! No is-a
        Teacher* t2 = new Teacher();        // ok
        Student* s2 = new Student();    // ok
        pro->publicInterface();     // ok
    t2->publicInterface();      // not compiling
    s2->publicInterface();      // not compiling
    t2->teachPublic();          // ok
    t2->teachProtected();           // ok
    t2->teachPrivate();         // not compiling
    s2->learnPublic();          // ok
    s2->learnProtected();       // not compiling   <-- compiles, but why?
    s2->learnPrivate();         // not compiling
    }

Running this it does mostly exactly what I would expect. However, the second last line seem to compile - which is kind of not exptected from the described behaviour of private inheritance.

Has someone an idea why this is compiling?

  • This is not java, you don't need public: on the each line. – HolyBlackCat Jan 14 '18 at 15:34
  • 1
    It compiles because learnProtected is a public member function of Student, it's irrevelant what it does or doesn't call. – HolyBlackCat Jan 14 '18 at 15:35
  • @HolyBlackCat Is correct. Remember that typically (with non-inliine functions) the compiler cannot access the function implementation at all at the point of call. What it can see is the declaration in the class declaration. – Peter - Reinstate Monica Jan 14 '18 at 15:36
  • @HolyBlackCat, right that is correct. However, than the call inside learn protected should not compile public: void learnProtected(){protectedInterface();} – Simon Jan 14 '18 at 15:39
  • 1
    Private inheritance: The class itself knows what it inherits from and can use all non-private functions from the base, but outside code doesn't know that the class inherits from the base. Protected inheritanace: Same, but classes derived from this class know that it's derived from the base. – HolyBlackCat Jan 14 '18 at 16:06
0

The method learnProtected is public. Therefore it is callable "from outside" (i.e. via s2).

The method protectedInterface is protected, which means it is only accessible by the members and friends of Person or by the members of any class derived from Person. Student class is derived from Person and therefore learnProtected can call protectedInterface.

The fact that it privately inherits from Person does only affect the external visibility of the Base class and members. Student itself can access any public or protected member of Person no matter which inheritance (private, protected, public) is used.

0

yes, thank you HolyBlackCat!

I have now an example that explains for me the behaviour of private inheritance:

    class Person{
    public: virtual void publicInterface() {}
    protected: virtual void protectedInterface() {}
    private: virtual void privateInterface() {}
};
class Professor : public Person  {};
class Teacher : protected Person { 
public: void teachPublic(){publicInterface();}
void teachProtected(){protectedInterface();}    // ok!
    void teachPrivate(){privateInterface();}        // not compiling
};
class Student : private Person {
public: void learnPublic(){publicInterface();}
void learnProtected(){protectedInterface();}    // ok!
void learnPrivate(){privateInterface();}        // not compiling
};
class TA : public Teacher {
public: void correctExercises(){publicInterface();}
};
class Child : public Student {
public: void play(){publicInterface();}  //NOT working, since we priva
};
int main()
{
    Person* p = new Person();       // ok is-a
Person* pro = new Professor();  // ok    is-a
    Person* t = new Teacher();      // not compiling! No is-a relat.
    Person* s = new Student();      // not compiling! No is-a
    Teacher* t2 = new Teacher();        // ok
    Student* s2 = new Student();    // ok
    pro->publicInterface();     // ok
t2->publicInterface();      // not compiling
s2->publicInterface();      // not compiling
t2->teachPublic();          // ok
t2->teachProtected();           // ok
t2->teachPrivate();         // not compiling
s2->learnPublic();          // ok
s2->learnProtected();           // ok! learnProteted is public
s2->learnPrivate();         // not compiling
TA* ta = new TA();          // ok 
Child* c = new Child();     // ok
ta->correctExercises(); // ok
c->play();              // ok however call inside play not ok!
}

But I still think this is quite obscure .. no one would really come up with such a design in real world, right?

-2

The function Person::learnProtected() is not visible in the class Student, so when you declare Student::learnProtected(), the compiler understands it as not override declaration.

You could ensure this adding the constrain "override" to Student::learnProtected(), the compiler will show an error when the function is not overriding a parent virtual function:

public: void learnProtected() override { protectedInterface(); }

This causes the compiler error:

C3668 'Student::learnProtected': method with override specifier 'override' did not override any base class methods ConsoleApplication3

  • the OP's example use no override at all. – apple apple Jan 14 '18 at 15:47

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.