4

I have a list of unnamed lists that I need to convert into a usable data.frame. For the most part, each list inside the list have the same element names but some will have some elements that others will not. So each list should be a Row in my data.frame, each variable name should be a column and in cases where a list doesn't have a particular variable the data.frame should contain an NA element.

In my example this_list is what I'm working with and this_df is what I would like to have. I've tried various ways to unlist and convert to data.frame, but my column names just become repeated and I get only 1 observation. Thank you.

this_list <- list(list(
  Name = "One",
  A = 2,
  B = 3,
  C = 4,
  D = 5
),
list(
  Name = "Two",
  A = 5,
  B = 2,
  C = 1
))


this_df <- data.frame(Name=c("One","Two"),
                      A=c(2,5),
                      B=c(3,2),
                      C=c(4,1),
                      D=c(5,NA))
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3

Solution using base R only. Sequentially does a full join on each list element. (edited based on comment from @RichScriven)

 this_df <- Reduce(function(x, y) merge(x, y, all = TRUE), this_list)
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  • 2
    The merge function has as.data.frame built in to its arguments, so you could do this all with just the second line Reduce(function(x, y) merge(x, y, all=TRUE), this_list). – Rich Scriven Jan 14 '18 at 19:10
  • Additionally, to cover lists longer than length 2, function(...) merge(..., all=TRUE) would be more appropriate – Rich Scriven Jan 14 '18 at 19:16
  • The original method should work for lists of length >2. merge() in base R can only take two arguments, which is why Reduce() is needed. – qdread Jan 14 '18 at 19:20
  • 1
    This isn't a robust solution, as it will merge duplicates, e.g. c(this_list, this_list) and combine non-overlapping observations, e.g. list(list(a = 1), list(b = 2)) or similarly-keyed ones, e.g. list(list(a = 1), list(a = 1, b = 2)) – alistaire Jan 14 '18 at 19:32
4

This is a task for which people frequently reach for dplyr::bind_rows or data.table::rbindlist. However, in base R, if the list elements are consistent, a quick base R solution is do.call(rbind, ...):

do.call(rbind, list(this_list[[1]][1:4], this_list[[2]]))
#>      Name  A B C
#> [1,] "One" 2 3 4
#> [2,] "Two" 5 2 1

It returns a matrix, but can be cleaned up fairly easily.

However, if the list elements are not consistent, it recycles in an annoying way (with a warning, thankfully):

do.call(rbind, this_list)
#> Warning in (function (..., deparse.level = 1) : number of columns of result
#> is not a multiple of vector length (arg 2)
#>      Name  A B C D    
#> [1,] "One" 2 3 4 5    
#> [2,] "Two" 5 2 1 "Two"

Thus the need for a more robust solution, e.g.

rbind_list <- function(list, ...){
    # generate a vector of all variable names
    vars <- Reduce(function(x, y){union(x, names(y))}, list, init = c()); 

    filled_list <- lapply(list, function(x){
        x <- x[vars]    # add missing elements, reordering if necessary
        names(x) <- vars    # fix missing names
        x <- lapply(x, function(y){
            if (is.null(y)) {    # replace NULL with NA
                NA
            } else if (is.list(y)) {
                if (length(y) != 1) y <- list(y)    # handle non-length-1 list columns
                I(y)    # add as-is class to list columns so they don't fail
            } else {
                y
            }
        }) 
        as.data.frame(x, ...)    # coerce to data frame
    })

    do.call(rbind, filled_list)    # rbind resulting list of data frames
}

It does decidedly better than do.call(rbind, ...):

rbind_list(this_list, stringsAsFactors = FALSE)
#>   Name A B C  D
#> 1  One 2 3 4  5
#> 2  Two 5 2 1 NA

rbind_list(c(this_list, this_list))
#>   Name A B C  D
#> 1  One 2 3 4  5
#> 2  Two 5 2 1 NA
#> 3  One 2 3 4  5
#> 4  Two 5 2 1 NA

rbind_list(list(list(a = 1), list(b = 2)))
#>    a  b
#> 1  1 NA
#> 2 NA  2

rbind_list(list(list(a = 1), list(a = 1, b = 2)))
#>   a  b
#> 1 1 NA
#> 2 1  2

rbind_list(list(list(a = 1, b = 2), list(b = 2, a = 1)))
#>   a b
#> 1 1 2
#> 2 1 2

...though list column handling is still inconsistent:

# correct; is a list column
rbind_list(list(list(a = 1, c = list('foo')), list(a = 1, c = list('baz'))))
#>   a   c
#> 1 1 foo
#> 2 1 baz

# also correct
rbind_list(list(list(a = 1, c = list(c('foo', 'bar'))), list(a = 1, c = list('baz'))))
#>   a        c
#> 1 1 foo, bar
#> 2 1      baz

# can handle non-encapsulated nested lists
rbind_list(list(list(a = 1, c = list('foo', 'bar')), list(a = 1, c = list('baz'))))
#>   a        c
#> 1 1 foo, bar
#> 2 1      baz

# ...which confuses dplyr
dplyr::bind_rows(list(list(a = 1, c = list('foo', 'bar')), list(a = 1, c = list('baz'))))
#> Error in bind_rows_(x, .id): Argument 2 must be length 1, not 2

# ...but fills missing list elements with NA because it doesn't track classes across observations
rbind_list(list(list(a = 1), list(c = list('baz'))))
#>    a   c
#> 1  1  NA
#> 2 NA baz

# ...which dplyr handles better
dplyr::bind_rows(list(list(a = 1), list(c = list('baz'))))
#> # A tibble: 2 x 2
#>       a c        
#>   <dbl> <list>   
#> 1  1.00 <NULL>   
#> 2 NA    <chr [1]>

While certainly more robust than do.call(rbind, ...), at scale this approach is likely to be considerably slower than package implementations written in C or C++.

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  • Agreed, this is more robust especially since @Nickerbocker mentioned it is destined to go into a package and needs to be flexible – qdread Jan 15 '18 at 0:27
4

You can use rbindlist from data.table:

library(data.table)
that_df <- as.data.frame(rbindlist(this_list, fill = TRUE))

# the result
   Name A B C  D
1:  One 2 3 4  5
2:  Two 5 2 1 NA
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  • For users new to data.table, it's worth noting that this returns a data.table, which behaves a little differently than a data.frame. – alistaire Jan 14 '18 at 19:28
3

Just another alternative using the dplyr package:

bind_rows(this_list)
# A tibble: 2 x 5
   Name     A     B     C     D
  <chr> <dbl> <dbl> <dbl> <dbl>
1   One     2     3     4     5
2   Two     5     2     1    NA

EDIT:

While we are at it. Here is another fast alternative from rlist:

list.stack(this_list, fill = TRUE)
  Name A B C  D
1  One 2 3 4  5
2  Two 5 2 1 NA
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  • There it is! That is the one I had used before. Thanks -- this is actually for a package so I'm going to go with non-dplyr solution as I've done pretty well about not having any dependencies thus far. – Nickerbocker Jan 14 '18 at 19:20

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