-3

I have tried to get this q but without any success... The task is to build a function by this conditions:

// b('m') -> 'bm'
// b()()('m') -> 'boom'
// b()()()()('m') -> 'boooom'

That is my try:

var b = (a) => {
    var counter = 0;
    var times = counter += 1;
    var d = (a, o, times) => {
        var o = 'o'.repeat(times);
        return ('b' + o + a);
    };
    return d();
};

console.log(b('m'));
  • Y h n a a q.... – zerkms Jan 14 '18 at 20:05
  • Can you think of how you’d make an object where o.value() === 0, o.add().value() === 1, o.add().add().value() === 2, and so on? – Ry- Jan 14 '18 at 20:08
  • I didnt get your question – user9078062 Jan 14 '18 at 20:10
  • @Ofirshukrun I mentioned that "you have not asked a question". I though you were so in rush saving to type a question word so that I shortened all words in a phrase to save even more time! – zerkms Jan 14 '18 at 20:23
3

As another variant of what naomik and NinaScholz proposed, you could avoid the extra optional argument, and use the this context (in ES6) to store a number primitive value that tracks how many 'o' characters to produce:

function b(a) {
    return a ? 'b' + 'o'.repeat(+this) + a : b.bind((+this||0)+1);
}

console.log(b('m'));
console.log(b()('m'));
console.log(b()()('m'));
console.log(b()()()('m'));

The string is only composed when b is called with a (truthy) argument: that string is a "b" followed by a number of "o" characters (determined by this) and finally the argument (i.e. "m" in the actual calls). If this is not defined (or is the global object, in non-strict mode), the count of "o" is considered to be 0. This happens when b is called immediately with an argument (no chaining).

When b is called without argument, the function itself is returned, but with a this bound to it that has been increased with 1. NB: so it is not actually the function itself, but a bound variant of it.

  • Yes that would work -- a bit dirty, but concise! – trincot Jan 14 '18 at 20:52
5

You need to return a function when the input is not 'm' – returning d () is not returning a function, it's returning the result of a call to d

Here's a way you can do it using an optional parameter with a default value

const b = (a, acc = 'b') =>
  a === 'm'
    ? acc + a
    : a => b (a, acc + 'o')

console.log (b ('m'))
console.log (b () ('m'))
console.log (b () () ('m'))
console.log (b () () () ('m'))

And another way using continuation-passing style

const b = (a, k = m => 'b' + m) =>
  a === 'm'
    ? k (a)
    : a => b (a, m =>
        k ('o' + m))

console.log (b ('m'))
console.log (b () ('m'))
console.log (b () () ('m'))
console.log (b () () () ('m'))

Some people complain about things they don't understand - here's the same function using imperative style

function b (a, acc = 'b')
{
  if (a === 'm')
    return a
  else
    return a => b (a, acc + 'o')
}
0

You could return use Function#bind and use a temporary this.

function  b() {
    return arguments.length
        ? (this.value || 'b') + arguments[0]
        : b.bind({ value: (this.value || 'b') + 'o' });
}

console.log(b('m'));
console.log(b()('m'));
console.log(b()()('m'));
console.log(b()()()('m'));

0

function b must return itself binded to number + 1 if it was called with no params. and return a string bo.(n times).om. b is initially binded to 0.

let b = (function boom(number, value) {
    if (value === 'm') {
        return 'b' + 'o'.repeat(number) + 'm';
    }
    else {
        return boom.bind(null, number + 1);
    }
}).bind(null, 0); // number value is initialized to 0

console.log(b()()('m')); // boom

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy